Merchandising Cancer

I am pretty sure I’ll offend people today.

I offend myself. I have reservations if I should even post what I’ve written. It looks like I have despite my doubts.

I know my thoughts surrounding merchandising cancer have an angry tone. I am not sorry for it and won’t apologize. I get to feel angry that people make money off a disease that kills. I get to feel angry that people buy t-shirts and mugs rather than donate directly to research. I get to feel angry that I put myself through agony in an effort to change even one person’s attitude about breast cancer merchandise.

Offensive Section

Are you someone who feels okay with pink ribbon shirts? Somehow these are big business whereas merchandising other demographics would be abominations.

Think about these scenarios:

Alcoholism and drug addiction merchandise. Those who conquer these demons work hard every single day. It just isn’t necessary to wear their sobriety on their sleeve. Chips are awarded as small recognition for major achievements. The first chip is earned after 24 hours. It’s not a market for profit. April is designated as Alcohol Awareness Month but it doesn’t garner the same kind of attention that cold beer at sporting events attracts.

Where are the COVID shirts? It’s current and global. Or would those be in poor taste?

Yes, they would be in horrible taste. Sadly, there probably will be some that eventually surface. Maybe they already have. The 200,000+ who have died won’t be given a second thought. The global death toll has topped over a million.

Where are the shirts featuring funeral homes, coffins, or grave markers? We all will use these in some form or another at some point. Why not celebrate it with cute shirts? People wouldn’t have to worry about what to wear to funerals. This captive audience isn’t being targeted.

Because it’s wrong, offensive, sick, and unthinkable.

Pinkwashing

Pinkwashing is when a company uses breast cancer to promote itself and its products or services. Often there is no support of breast cancer charities at all.

None of what I suggested should be merchandised. Somehow though, it’s allowable to profit off cancer.

You may see pink. I see death. I see the coffins and the funerals. I see visits to cemeteries. I don’t understand why someone needs a shirt to celebrate every day in October. I have read such stories from people who own a pink shirt to wear each day in the name of awareness.

A t-shirt typically is priced around $25. It totals $775 if you have a different one for each day in October. Ask for a donation to cancer research and it sounds like a bizarre idea to some because nothing tangible is gained from donating.

Facebook Comments

I see too many ads on Facebook that have around 2 thousand comments. Merchandising cancer is a business, pure and simple.

 If two thousand people put $25 each toward metastatic breast cancer research, it would total $50,000.

The following are actual comments from Facebook with names removed. They all push my buttons in some form. My takeaway is there are an awful lot of people who easily fall prey to a pretty pink product and pink messaging and all the pinkwashing that Pinktober brings.

Sending prayers to all my tired 6 years ago but I won …hang in there lady’s you can beat it to

(We all make an occasional typo, but lack of punctuation and correct grammar makes this hard to decipher. This is how the comment was written word for word.)

Be strong you! You can order this shirt here:

Omg love this….. it’s so true!!9 years and counting.

Love this shirt! I need this!!!!!

I need this for October which is breast cancer awareness month

My daughter is fighting right now she has her last chemo treatment on the 17th this is what she would say. I just pray we can say it’s gone and she can ring that bell… god bless you all ❤️❤️

OMG I NEED THIS SHIRT!!!!

So cute!

Beautiful

Fight!Fight!Fight!!!!

ABSOLUTELY love this, I’m a 35plus year Survivor, I’m getting this 

I am in that fight myself, but I have God on my side.

Quite a few just type words like blessings, prayers, hugs, or use several prayer and heart emojis.

There are a couple emojis I have in mind that I am tempted to use. Yes, those.

I’ve ranted on a few of these sites out of frustration and anger. I don’t think it does much. Direct replies to others’ comments are my new strategy. By focusing on individuals, I hope to make a difference one by one. Information presented without my angry tone may be more effective. I don’t mind if anyone reading wants to join me and use my comments.

Here are a few of my attempts:

I can understand if wearing a shirt helps you feel strong right now. None of the proceeds from these shirts go to breast cancer research. I feel strong when I advocate and donate for more research.

Have you considered donating to breast cancer research? Thank you if you already have.

Nothing from sales goes towards research. Nothing! If two thousand people put $25 each toward metastatic breast cancer research that would total $50,000. Is wearing a “cute” shirt that “you have to have” really the way you want to go? There’s nothing cute about cancer. Having this shirt does nothing for research. Many thanks if you’ve donated to research. Always check where your contributions go and how they are used.

A more recent trend has been for people to comment on their breast cancer status and their diagnosis. There is no mention of their interest or thoughts on the advertised shirt. The comment is entirely focused on their personal experience. These folks are looking for a support group. I fail to see the connection to an ad campaign where their experience has not been solicited. These comments usually get a comment from the company as a reply with a link to order the shirt. That is really inappropriate. It’s especially low when someone has commented someone died from cancer and it’s clear they are in pain.

Businesses profit off cancer. They don’t care.

A charity or fundraiser makes money to benefit cancer care or research. They do care.

Is there a place for pink?

Are all shirts and other pink merchandise inherently bad? No. I will admit there are a few I like that convey hope. I still won’t order one based on principle and my goal to support research. I understand there are people who buy them in the name of advocacy and believe they are promoting awareness by wearing them. Maybe they have. I have yet to read a valuable comment that connects wearing the shirt to advocacy plans.

I am not against awareness. Walks and runs are important. They give hope and a sense of agency. They raise money. Fundraiser dinners and events do the same thing. Awareness must be tied to action that directly supports the cause and purpose at hand.

I am also not against pink. There are several women I know who have used it for the right reasons and recognize the metastatic community is part of their work. I am grateful for them.

If t-shirts were the answer, I would have been handed one upon diagnosis and sent on my merry way. Pinkwashing makes me blue. Mostly red with anger. Merchandise isn’t lifesaving. Merchandise lines the pockets of the business executives. Merchandise follows demand. I dream of the day when there is no demand because there are cures for all cancers.

Research can save lives.

Not pink.