What I Did Last Summer

Spring was lost.

Summer was lost.

Uneventful days passed.

Life inched by like a snail going nowhere.

COVID has consumed six months now.

Six months gone.

Mostly alone.

Gone forever.

And yet I look at the good.

I can’t help it.

Good is always around.

Also forever.

One place I found it was in flowers.

Repetitive days of solitude

And safeness

Drew me to nature.

My camera my paintbrush.

Flowers my canvas.

So many patterns and colors

From 6 inches away.

Wonder

Beauty

Life

Joy

Summer was not lost after all.

A world covered in flowers is not only beautiful but a reassuring constant.

These thoughts formed as I thought about what I did over summer. There were a couple momentous events that I celebrated because birthdays and related plans still happen in pandemics. Most days were quiet. There was a lot of sameness and not much to shout about. I viewed medical appointments as chances to socialize a bit. My trips to the grocery store twice a month held high excitement.

My photos visually reflect what I did last summer whether I puttered about my back yard, paused to take a photo while walking in the neighborhood, or found myself in a favorite nature setting.

Patterns and colors in flowers captivated me this summer.
Everything about this makes me feel happy. The bright vibrant color. The layered petals. The petals slowly unfurling and still emerging from the center. It is a world in itself.
Floating flower art feels very zen.
Blues and purples are a soothing combination.
These colors remind me of a sunset. I marveled at several of these and found all were slightly different, just like every sunset.
This succulent reminded me of glazed pottery. I’m pretty sure it follows a Fibonacci sequence.
Bee balm attracts so much life. Watching its visitors has brought many happy moments to my summer.
Every flower has a story. I am one flower sharing mine.

Ice Cream Memories

Good memories are sweet like ice cream.

My ice cream specific memories from past vacations are vivid enough to eat.

Dippy’s is a small ice cream shop in Fish Creek, Wisconsin, offering about 20 flavors daily. It’s a simple whitewashed building for to go service. There is a small porch outside with patio seating for relaxing and looking at the flowers and passersby. An old-fashioned red popcorn machine is positioned just outside the door for those preferring kettle corn reminiscent of movie theater popcorn drenched in butter flavoring with lots of yellow food coloring.

Dippy’s was a place to take a break from all the other relaxing being done on vacation. It was a good mid-afternoon or early evening treat. The fact that it was a few mere steps from the corner hotel where I stayed didn’t hurt.

There is something about an ice cream store that makes me feel like a kid again. I thought this was as true for my mom as it was for me. She would sit in front of the store in one of the wrought iron chairs wearing her shorts that came to her knees with a smile from ear to ear. She possessed something childlike even though she was into her seventies.

She always apologized that she couldn’t share her butter pecan or turtle ice cream because of my tree nut allergy. It didn’t bother me for the same reason I never offered to share my ice cream with her. All free sampling was done inside at the counter.

Rules are rules.

My grandma enjoyed ice cream into her nineties. Grandma would have a bowl of ice cream often during the evening on the farm. One thing I’m completely convinced about is the existence of an ice cream gene and that I got it.

Both my maternal grandmother and mother died from metastatic cancer. My grandma was diagnosed with liver cancer. She didn’t go through gads of scans to see if it spread and chose not to do treatment. She was 96 years old and only lasted a few months after the news, so I don’t think it’s unreasonable to believe she had metastatic disease. Anyway, genetic testing has revealed zilch in terms of the metastatic breast cancer in my body being inherited. I wonder if research hasn’t yet discovered the link.

Back to happy memories of ice cream because those memories make me feel happy. They take me back to a simpler time that was relaxed and unrushed. A bit of that feeling is captured whenever I enjoy a scoop or two. Sometimes those memories take me back to as recent as last week and other times much further.

Some memories take me back to summer nights in early childhood. People sat outside after supper just to relax. My sister and I would sit on the front step of the house in the humidity enjoying a bowl of ice cream before our bedtime stories.

In my childhood, I was a chocolate or vanilla person. Discovering mint chocolate chip made me feel pretty sophisticated. I still love mint chocolate chip, but favorite flavors also include cookie dough, coffee, and chocolate peanut butter.

Chocolate peanut butter was recently enjoyed on a lovely summer day.

I love moments of simplicity. I’ll take every single one I can get living with metastatic breast cancer. Memories that make me smile are delicious. That’s true whether I’m sitting on the front stoop as a child, outside at Dippy’s, or sitting along the waterfront outside Wilson’s Restaurant  in Door County slowly working on a double scoop while watching the sun dip below the water. It holds true if I’m home enjoying a dish.

Even Snoop Dogg knows ice cream is a good thing. Only Snoop knows his plans for the future, but maybe he was serious when he said, “When I’m no longer rapping, I want to open up an ice cream parlor and call myself Scoop Dogg.”

He would get no complaints from me.

Is all this just about ice cream? Yes and no. Sometimes ice cream is just ice cream. Ice cream is surely one of the better things in this world. You’re never too young or too old for it. There is a flavor for everyone. It’s a simple pleasure.

It also can be a metaphor for life.

Ice cream melts quickly.

Enjoy it before it’s gone.

During, Now, and Next

I often read about someone’s cancer experience in terms of before and after cancer. I also often read that there is no after for those living with metastatic breast cancer because we will always be in treatment. Extreme outliers push what is possible. They keep living with cancer year after year. People living with metastatic disease need words that aren’t in terms of before or after.

I prefer during, now, and next.

A Brief Look at Before Cancer

Before cancer was a golden time of no worries. People lived with no physical limitations. They had job security and careers stretching out ahead of them. Dreams were plentiful and ranged from travel, starting families, professional accomplishments, and personal goals. Normal life expectancies were part of the plan. Life was busy with many friends. Five-year plans were achievable and plans were made for the future without doubting the future.

I felt as others did.

Life was good then. I knew it, but I didn’t realize how good I had it.

I didn’t know the meaning of a bad hair day.

I liked October.

Thoughts About After Cancer

For many, after cancer means getting back to normal, returning to work, growing hair, and putting cancer forever in the past. Survivors post side-by-side photos of their cancer days when they were bald next to photos of a year post treatment when they feel they are once and for all done with cancer where it no longer looks like they ever had cancer.

Life after cancer may mean changes in diet and exercise. Maybe there are new considerations for returning to work or career changes. Life may bring changes in income, changes in health insurance, and changes with how bodies look. There are some who reclaim their past and work to make their life after cancer as much like their before cancer life as possible. For some it means continued support groups, giving back to cancer organizations, and participating in other ways to make a difference in the cancer community.

October becomes a month to celebrate the wonderful and misleading world of awareness. A few reminisce about their cancer days almost as if they were remembering summer camp or a crazy story from high school. I figure it’s easy to reminisce when you are on the other side and treatment is done. There are plenty who see cancer far in their past and it doesn’t affect day-to-day life one bit.

Before cancer is only a memory. After cancer is in the present. After cancer is the future.

It’s a strong possibility I would feel the same if I were in their shoes, but I’m not. I don’t know what it’s like to be “cancer free” as they say. I think it’s the same as how someone without cancer doesn’t know what it’s like for someone with cancer. Those of us with cancer don’t even completely understand what it’s like for another person with cancer. We come close. We can identify and empathize with emotional and physical pain. I have been fortunate to connect with many who write exactly what I feel. I think of these people as my friends even though I haven’t met them.

After cancer means returning to normal or the so called new normal.  In my opinion there is no normal or new normal. I describe my life as a new abnormal and wrote about it in an earlier post you can read here.

Long Ago

It’s hard for me to remember my before cancer days. It feels like another lifetime. I have grieved those days as I would a person. Grief resurfaces with some memories of the past. My eyes water lately when looking at old photos. Who was that person that used to be me? It was someone with dreams that have been shattered.

Even photos from childhood cause some sadness.

Teaching was a huge part of my adult life. I am so far away from those days now that it’s hard to remember elements that were driving forces. So many faces have changed where I taught.

Even some memories of my mom, dad, and grandma have drifted almost too far away. I hate that and I miss them.

What was it like to have boundless energy? What was it like to see my future?

I can’t remember.

The world of before is out of reach.

During, Now, and Next

Good words I use to mark time are during, now, and next.

During is like an umbrella held over now and next. It’s all the time from diagnosis onward. It includes a lot of enduring cancer related life like scans, labs, other tests, office visits, treatments, and waiting. Too much time is filled with enduring cancer when treatment days, side effects, and large chunks of time filled with anxieties or sadness take hold. Instead of after cancer I have an undefined during.

During cancer isn’t all bad. I still taught for four years during cancer. Many are able to keep working. I still live independently. I am still active. I still take vacations (just not presently). Many do all these things, too. Many retire and tell others they finally get to do whatever they want because there is no schedule to keep or boss in charge. I don’t do whatever I want because my health can get in the way, but I try. Living well while living with cancer is possible.

During cancer is a time where nothing ever lasts. I’ve lived in this time labeled during so long that I feel like my life before cancer was lived by an entirely different person.

At my core I still have the same values and main personality traits. Cancer has exaggerated some of them. I have more anxieties and more sensitivities. I am quick to cry. Heck, I’ve cried writing this post. I am more intense and more driven which I possibly could attribute to aging and becoming more confident. I put more emphasis on hope and kindness. I can still crack a joke in the midst of personal misery.

Now is an excellent word. Living in the now enables me to focus on the present moment. I appreciate my wildflowers. I listen to the rumble of thunder. I walk barefoot in the grass. I drink refreshing pink lemonade. Now is where I find joy, hope, and positivity. I work hard not to let anything crush my sense of now. I try to enjoy each day. There is always something. Waking up to greet a new day and gratefully closing my eyes to dream at night are bookends for every day.

Now is the present. Savoring the moment when moments are good stretch out my enjoyment. I savor my breakfast. I savor walks in nature when I’m surrounded by trees and see the sun shining though the leaves. I savor gentle breezes on my skin. I savor laughing and feeling loved. None of these moments can be bottled. They can be replicated as often as possible. Many moments living in the now make up a day. It’s where I live when days are good. Those days add up. I am very lucky for the now I have carved out and the now where I live. Now is all I really have. It’s all any of us truly have.

Living my life involves multiple treatment plans. The word next comes into play when I switch to the next treatment. It also applies to my next cycle of whatever current drug I’m receiving. My treatment visits number into the hundreds. Life is filled with more worries and anxieties. I worry I’ll never again have hair when I’m without it. I worry I’ll soon lose it when I have it. It’s one of my big current worries.

Next is my future. I think about next week or next month. I think about my next piece of writing. I think about what I want to work on next with my trainer and my next physical goal. I have goals for next year. I cautiously make plans knowing they may change. I make them with the intention they will happen. I even think long term because that is energy I want the universe to have. I envision a positive and healthy future because I’m not willing to give up dreaming of my future. It may not be the future I planned before cancer, but it is mine now.

I apologize if this all sounds a bit disjointed. These markers in time are fluid and won’t hold still. Referring to words as nouns that usually function as other parts of speech may not come across in the way I hope they do. Living during metastatic breast cancer means living in an ongoing state of flux. I need sets of words to help mark different spots in the spaces where I live. During, now, and next are working well for me.

I AM

I feel like the last few weeks of my life have been incredibly full and jammed packed. Too much is happening all at the same time. It always happens that way, doesn’t it? I haven’t been able to write a new post for today. Instead, I’m posting a poem I wrote about two months after I was diagnosed in 2012. It still rings true for me. It’s still my voice, my heart, and who I am.

In the original version, the font gradually gets larger and larger as the poem continues. I can’t do that the way I want on WordPress.  If read aloud, my voice gets louder and louder in a slow crescendo. That doesn’t work in this format either. Just sayin’.

If I had to add anything new my writing, I would include that I am a badass.

         I AM

I am not cancer.

I am not my hair.

I am not chemo, surgery, or radiation.

I am not my breasts.

I am not a project.

I am not defeatable.

I am not stoppable.

 

I am AMAZING.

I am NURTURING.

I am SUPPORTIVE.

I am SMART.

I am CLEVER.

I am DETERMINED.

I am POWERFUL.

I am a WINNER.

I am BEAUTIFUL.

I am LOVELY.

I am SEXY.

I am FUNNY.  (Just not at the same time as being sexy. 🤪)

I am FAITHFUL.

I am SPIRITUAL.

I am THOUGHTFUL.

I am UNIQUE.

I am CREATIVE.

I am ORIGINAL.

I am WISE.

I am FUN.

I am SWEET.

I am POSITIVE.

I am UPBEAT.

I am a DAUGHTER.

I am a SISTER.

I am a FRIEND.

I am a TEACHER.

I am a LEARNER.

 

I AM TOUGH.

I AM STRONG.

I AM A FORCE.

I AM A SURVIVOR.

I AM JOY.

I AM LIGHT.

I AM PEACE.

I AM KIND.

I AM LOVED.

I AM GRATEFUL.

I AM BLESSED.

I AM IN LOVE WITH LIFE.