RAIN and Self-Compassion

Life is crazy these days.

Crazy.

That is the word I keep coming back to over the course of the last month, weeks, and days. It’s even applicable to hours and minutes. It is difficult to escape because our lives have transformed to the confines of our own homes. The top story on local and national news now is the entire broadcast. Attempts to escape real life and watch a show on TV is interrupted with advertisements about how life has changed. I fill my time fairly successfully. The day still can feel long when I’m isolating alone. It’s almost too much.

I am tired of feeling stressed, overwhelmed, worn out, or numb by life these days.

Tara Brach is a well-known psychologist and author. Her work blends together Western psychology and Eastern spiritual practices. She is huge in the world of meditation and mindfulness. One of her main tools is rooted in the acronym RAIN and is a way to connect with self-compassion when experiencing emotional difficulty.

These crazy times have their share of emotional difficulty. My plan today is to share more about RAIN and how it works.

R – Recognize what is happening.

A – Allow the experience to be there, just as it is.

I  – Investigate with interest and care.

N – Nurture with self-compassion.

R – Recognize what is happening.

What are the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors affecting me right now?

Me: I am PISSED OFF about all my plans falling apart. A Triple F would fit nicely here. Travel, birthday, entertainment, and fundraising plans have been canceled. My birthday isn’t canceled but I’m starting from scratch. Whatever alternate plans I make may also get scrapped in the end. Workouts and book clubs are all experienced remotely. It’s depressing.

I feel like I’m not living and there was a successful effort to live each day fully before life shifted to being safer at home. I feel like a blob. I ate quite nutritiously for the first few weeks and now I’m seeing behaviors where I’m eating out of boredom or stress. I’m grabbing sugar over healthy nutrients. I moved around tons for the first few weeks and now that behavior has taken a bad turn as well. I feel sickish a lot of the time due to these behaviors.

A – Allow the experience to be there, just as it is.

Nothing is being fixed or avoided. Emotions and sensations are allowed to just be. Fear shows up here often.

Me: Yep, I’ve had the fear, I’ve had the tears. Mostly anger. A lot of disappointment. There’s worry and anxiety. Allowing is a good term for this part of the process because I can’t fix any of it if I tried. I am in a frozen state of numbness where I’m allowing and waiting.

I – Investigate with interest and care.

This may show up as what you are experiencing in your body or beliefs. Is my stomach in knots? Does my heart feel heavy? Has my breathing changed? What thoughts or beliefs match where my body gives its attention?

Me: I feel exhausted with all the nothing. There are times I let out the heaviest and longest sigh I have. My legs feel heavy. I wonder if I have weights attached to them as I climb the stairs. The mad, sad, bad feeling is over my heart. My stomach feels icky.

N – Nurture with self-compassion.

What do I need? How can I give myself the space to show myself understanding, comfort, and self-compassion?

Me: Based on what I’ve written, it appears that my heart, solar plexus, and root chakras are out of whack. These areas have corresponding body parts that are causing me grief and crying out for help. I can do some targeted yoga to support those areas and myself. I feel much better on days I can get for a walk outside and have some time in nature. Exercise nurtures me a lot. Sometimes physically putting up my hand and verbally saying “stop” is useful when negative self-talks takes hold. To me, nurturing is the most important part because nothing changes if I do nothing with what I’ve recognized, allowed, and investigated.

The first three really identify what’s going on. The last part makes sure I nurture, tend to, and take care of myself. I’ve heard the nurturing step is often not completed because people don’t know what to do. Someone I know suggested that if you don’t know how to do the last step, think about how someone else you know would do it. Choose someone you view as wise and compassionate. Visualize what they would do and then apply it to your situation.

Other ideas that work for me are one or more of the following:

  • Drink some water. Hydration is a good way to reset.
  • Walk around a bit. Keep blood and oxygen moving. Stretch. Kettlebell work usually does the trick, but kettlebells aren’t always handy.
  • Oxygen flow is again the focus. Take full, long, slow inhales and exhales. Breathwork is the simplest fix to support physical and emotional changes. It can improve mood and is thought to boost immunity.

As you know, I’m all about finding a way. Walking myself through the four parts of RAIN is one way to support myself, guide myself, and work with my feelings so I can lessen the crazy and emphasize something more grounded. Crazy is too hard to maintain. Grounding offers something calmer and more stable. I don’t know about you, but I could use calmness and stability during times where there are no solid reference points and prolonged times of uncertainty and unknowns.

A Day Off

Waking up to sunshine

feels good.

My soul is warm

from sleep.

I am rested.

I was away from cancer

if only in my dreams.

 

What would a day,

an honest to goodness

waking day,

be like away from cancer?

 

No lab numbers to think about.

No office visits

or treatments.

No waiting rooms

with the

disquieting

discomfort

that there are so many others

quietly waiting

and doing what I do

regularly.

 

No appointments

to schedule.

No scans or tests.

 

No pharmacies.

No new scripts.

No refills.

No hassles.

 

I wouldn’t have to take any

medications or

supplements

that may or

may not

help.

 

No side effects

to manage

for just one day.

 

No MyChart.

No waiting for answers

to questions that only

raise more

questions

or cause

more

angst.

 

I would be absent from

Twitter,

Facebook,

Instagram,

and WordPress.

 

The TV would be off all day.

I wouldn’t be subjected to

commercials for

Ibrance,

Piqray,

Verzenio,

Kisqali,

or the latest

metastatic breast cancer

drug.

 

I wouldn’t have to see a character

portrayed with cancer

with misinformation or

one who doesn’t match

my reality.

 

There is

always

something

to remind me.

 

A day off

would mean

ZERO

reminders

that I

live

with

metastatic breast cancer.

 

My mind

would need to be

wiped clean of my

knowledge and

memories

of having it

and of its existence.

 

Because I remember.

 

Because I am never away.

 

My only

break is

in my dreams

that aren’t real

and that are quickly

forgotten.

 

I don’t get a day off.

 

I get day

after day

after day . . .

 

And I’m still

here.

 

And I’m still

grateful.

Strong and Stronger with Kettlebells

A kettlebell is a cast iron ball with a handle at the top to hold onto while lifting. They come in a variety of sizes, fit all skill levels, and there are many different ways to use them.

Doorstops.

Paperweights.

Perhaps an impromptu anchor.

Or as a solid part of strength training.

I didn’t like kettlebell work when I first started using them. Allow me to state the obvious that they were heavy and I wasn’t very strong. Slowly that changed and over time I increased my lifting amount bit by bit. I could do more reps and I was taught different ways to use them in my workouts. I began to LOVE the kettlebell part of my training sessions. The main reason was I could see improvements and knew I was gaining physical strength as I moved from one kettlebell weight up to the next. It felt good in a world where I was accustomed to loss.

I ordered them as I needed them to use in my home. I asked for them for my birthday. I watched the UPS man lug small boxes to my doorstep and tell me whatever was in there was heavy. A few of the boxes came battered but the contents were in awesome condition. Kettlebells don’t dent.

Another reason why I love working with kettlebells is what they do for my emotional strength. I got stronger on the inside knowing what I was capable of on the outside. I felt more confident and determined. I stood taller. I felt better.

I cannot find who said the following but I have come back to it a lot lately –

“Just because you carry something well, doesn’t mean it isn’t heavy.”

I carry a lot. I carry metastatic breast cancer with me and it is always there whether it is in the foreground or background of an activity or conversation. It’s there.

It’s heavy.

We all have heavy things to carry that are not visible to others. Health. Emotions. Finances. Work. Relationships. Trauma. We carry a lot. Many of us carry these burdens well. We are used to the extra weight. We have figured out how to live with whatever we carry. Saying we are strong is an understatement. Just because we can carry it doesn’t mean that “it” isn’t heavy.

It sounds ironic but lifting kettlebells lightens the load.

Kettlebells help me work on some of my emotional weight along with something physical in this sense. I can release some of it for a few minutes. Somehow I feel more solid. I feel strong and in control of my decisions and outcomes for a bit. I feel in control.

Control is a pretty foreign feeling and I’ll take it when I can get it.

Working with kettlebells offers an amazing opportunity to combine cardio and strength training. Different muscle groups can be targeted. Deadlifts are a little different from squats. Arm presses work different muscles than curls. A traditional kettlebell swing is a quite fun and empowering feeling. I never get bored.

I get tired and I get sore, but I’m never bored.

Pavel Tsatsouline is the founder of the kettlebell school StrongFirst (written as one word). One quote of his that I love is, “We do not tolerate weakness at StrongFirst. You do not have a weak arm and a strong arm – but a strong and a stronger one.”

We are strong and stronger. Weak moments are not failures but learning opportunities. We are learning and learning some more. We are living in a growth mindset instead of a fixed mindset. I want to remember I am strong even on my suckiest days. I am stronger on better days but always coming from a place of strength. Hope equals strength.

The past week presented some glorious strong moments and a couple where strength was almost nonexistent. I’m still not sure there was any strength present at all. I had undeniably hard moments. Hard stuff doesn’t mean I’m weak. It means I have hard stuff and hard stuff sucks. Living in a world of strong and stronger is work.

“Keep calm and carry on.” The famous Winston Churchill quote from 1939 was meant to reassure the British public when major cities were threatened with air attacks during WWII. Air attacks strike me as an awful lot to carry, not to say anything about keeping calm.

To carry on means to stay the course. We all have heavy things to carry. But we carry on.

I can carry what is mine and I can stay the course. I am strong and stronger.

DSCF3702

 

Waiting Rooms

Time passes excruciatingly slowly in waiting rooms. It’s exhausting. The bulk of my oncology visits are spent waiting. At my last visit, I looked around at all the others waiting. Observing who was around me made the minutes pass more quickly.

There was one patient near me wearing a bandana on her head with a mask on. She was on her phone planning a vacation for October because she “should be able to go then” as she told her husband.

Her husband and another woman were working on a jigsaw puzzle. I gathered they already knew one another by the warm hug they shared as a greeting.

Next to me, there was an older man wearing a mask who was there with his wife. Both were reading books.

Another older couple waited. The woman was engrossed in a book and the man had his eyes glued to his phone.

There was another older man there by himself in a rocking chair on his phone. He was called back soon after I began taking stock of the waiting room.

A woman who walked with a cane perhaps in her sixties and her daughter were the next to head back to the treatment area.

There was a man across the room who came in single digit degree weather wearing shorts and donning a camouflaged hat. I think he was the patient.

A woman fidgeted her leg while she flipped through the pages of a magazine. Another older man near her read a book. My assessment was they were waiting for someone but I didn’t have anything solid to form my opinion.

A woman maybe in her late thirties wore a black headwrap with a top knot bun tied in front. Her husband was with her. He looked tired. She looked healthier than he did and my guess was she was the patient.

A senior lady slowly moved about on her own, wisps of gray hair sticking out of a coral crocheted cancer cap. She settled into one of the rockers.

Me.

Alone.

Not everyone came with a caregiver or companion. That observation surprised me because it seems I read or hear so much about caregiver support. I prefer being on my own because my days when I have a full schedule of appointments at the hospital get long and there is no reason for someone else to be with me. I am grateful to be able to manage well by myself when I make trips there on average three weeks out of every month, more during testing windows.

The TV blared an action movie that no one watched. It’s usually news or something claiming to be news on other days.

Sixteen waited by my count. Most were senior citizens. I was not the youngest one. Five were probably in their 30s or 40s. There were ten women and six men. My guess six of the ten women present were likely patients, compared to four of the six men. Three were black. The rest were white. No other groups were visibly represented by my observations.

All of us were waiting.

Waiting for treatment.

We’re waiting for many “nexts” in our lives.

Waiting for good news.

Waiting for the treatment part of the day to be done so we can go home.

Waiting for chemo fog to lift.

Waiting to not feel depressed.

Waiting to not have anxiety.

Waiting for favorite foods to taste good again.

Waiting for our immune systems to be strong once more.

Waiting for tests to be scheduled and completed.

Waiting for test results.

Waiting for more targeted treatments.

Waiting for research that addresses individual mutations for cancer subtypes.

Waiting for the other shoe to drop.

Waiting for phone calls.

Some may be waiting for a final treatment. Not me. Not having an end in sight is the preferred option for my life.

We all are waiting.

Some of us are waiting for the same things and some for different things.

Waiting rooms are spaces where you stay until things change. I have waited and waited and waited in personal waiting rooms of my own making. I have spent time waiting for others to do their part or pull their crap together. Waiting for others is inevitable when you need them in order to move forward with your part of the whole. It’s effective if you’re working as part of a strong team. Not so much if you’re wishing or hoping that someone maybe does something if they remember or have time. Waiting is hard for me because I am a doer.

I don’t like waiting and sometimes that’s the only thing left to do.

I am tired of waiting.

My wait was surprisingly short for this specific treatment visit. The waiting room looked different when it was time for me to leave about an hour later. More seats were filled. It looked like men outnumbered women.

The one factor that remained the same . . .

Everyone was still waiting.

We wait.