To Be An Untamed Cheetah

Glennon Doyle thinks about life differently from the mainstream population. I think I understand one or two basic ideas about life. Then I read her book Untamed, and she turned them upside down. 

Recent books I’ve read have been a topic of posts lately. This book reminded me that being untamed, even a little untamed, is the way we are supposed to be all along. The chapters are often short segments of storytelling where she makes her point through metaphor. Her style speaks to me as I often use narrative and metaphors to craft my writing. She gently encourages and inspires as she writes, sharing her story and thoughts with readers. There is a lot that resonated with me in Untamed.

One of those ideas is how we become adults and take our chosen place in society. It’s a chosen place we’ve dreamed of, worked hard for, and understand what our role is to be. Glennon draws a parallel between this life and a cheetah at a zoo who has been trained and tamed to mimic a dog rather than act like the cheetah it is.

She defines being tamed as meaning you have made yourself fit. We have been conditioned by the people and life around us. We have learned how we are supposed to act and feel rather than be act like our cheetah selves.

I took my place as a teacher and understood that I was seen as a teacher outside of the classroom as well as in it. Not being wild and crazy, I fit the persona well. Nurturing, well-liked, respected, and all the other positive qualities you would want to assign to a teacher. Underneath all that, there was also an expectation that you would not openly challenge authority too much. It contradicted teaching children to question and think critically. I didn’t challenge anything too much until I was diagnosed with metastatic cancer. It became clearer over time that I didn’t need to (and couldn’t) make myself fit. I do believe age and growing older also causes changes in our confidence and how we see life. I was able to behave more like a cheetah.

Women behave more like cheetahs as we age. Society wants to call us cougars. That label portrays women only one way. No, not sorry – we’re cheetahs. Get out of the way.

Women especially have been tamed to fulfill certain norms that are outdated and antiquated. We take care of others first. We may not reach high enough. We accept put downs from one another. About a month ago I listened quietly as women commented on young women who would never marry or have children because of metastatic cancer. Well, I’m no spring chicken, but there I was with no hubby and no children. The comment wasn’t meant to be hurtful or even apply to me, but that tamed part of me silently took it in rather than roaring. I’m tamed.

She goes even farther with a personal story to emphasize how unhealthy it is deny yourself permission to live how you want. Glennon described the time when she had neurological Lyme disease and was sick for two years. She couldn’t function and spent the majority of those two years in bed or swallowing pills. She felt better when she visited a friend living in Florida and it was then she understood she needed to stay there. Not only did she need to stay there, she wanted to stay there because she always had loved the beach.

We shouldn’t need a brush with death to learn how to live.

We always should honor our true selves.

In many ways, living with metastatic breast cancer has given me that permission to live more truthfully. I won’t say it’s allowed me to live as I want because I don’t want to live with all the suffering and uncertainty that accompanies cancer. I wake when I’m rested most mornings rather than rolling out in the dark to an alarm that sounds way too early. I don’t put in extra hours at a job I love just to feel like I’m barely keeping up. I don’t put myself last. Instead, I have time for me. I can take chances to do things that before cancer I would never have dared. When it comes down to it – no one cares and no one stops me.

We all need to live how we want.

Glennon Doyle wants us to shake things up a bit. Maybe a lot. She writes a lot about learning to be brave and become true to yourself. Our purpose is to live authentically and fully.

Here are a few ways I’ve seen myself becoming untamed:

• I’m an active and vocal participant in my medical care.

• I say NO more often.

• I have control over my own show and I like it. I can get a lot done when I can envision a goal and fully pursue it.

• I ask a lot more questions.

• I express my opinions more often.

I haven’t been to a zoo in a few years. The closest zoo to me doesn’t have a cheetah exhibit. Of course, all the animals are confined. They are there so humans can see wild animals. None of them behave as they should. They are tamed in the Glennon Doyle sense of the word.

Cheetahs are symbols of patience and intensity. As a spirit animal, they remind us to prioritize and set goals. I want to let my inner cheetah run wild. I want to move stealthily and quietly to get what I want.

Ah, to be a cheetah is to live more untamed. I will be more unleashed, uncaged, and even more wonderful than I already am.

Love Letter to My Future Self

A writing prompt is often given to write about what you would tell your younger self. I think the idea is an older and wiser person could reflect on the insecurities that never came to fruition. Maybe it’s an opportunity to focus on all the positives that have come to pass. As we age, we learn about what matters in life, where we find joy, and experience a stumble or two we’d like to avoid if given the chance. We don’t get to go back in time for do-overs. My younger self would feel doomed if I told her she wound up with metastatic breast cancer at 41. Wouldn’t she have the opportunity to change it? She sure tried. She/ we/ I had diagnostic mammograms for years in our 30s due to my mother’s breast cancer. It wasn’t enough. Cancer was missed. I know when I think this happened. I was dismissed and told not to worry when I was sweating profusely. Major sweat blobs. I think my lymph nodes were blocked, but I’m not a doctor. Iffy mammograms were followed up by ultrasound and I was always given an all clear. I can’t go back. Telling my younger self to be proactive wouldn’t help.

I was proactive.

Looking back at what could have been “if only” doesn’t provide comfort. The past is unchangeable. I think all of us feel a certain invincible quality when younger and that bad things can’t touch us until we are much older. Quite simply, it’s unbelievable. Our lives stretch out indefinitely in front of us when we are in our twenties and even our thirties. Our lives are finally just beginning.

So instead, how about standing where you are now and advising your future self? Now there’s an interesting prompt. It creates an opportunity where you can pause and dream about goals. I find myself looking back and forward. There are some logistic factors that don’t jive well. My future self would already know what happened in present time. Well, the metastatic breast cancer is out of the bag. I am wiser, know what matters to me now, and what brings me joy. For a few moments, I set my modesty aside as I think about my future. Here is what would I like to say to the me ten years in the future.

Dearest Kristie,

How did you make it to your 60s? I’m not sure, but know intention is something you carried with yourself day by day and projected into the future. Hope and sheer belief are part of it. Somehow you kept going.

You’ve been through a lot over ten years, but you’ve come out better for it.

Life is good.

As you know, you’re still awesome. People appreciate your perspective and wisdom. You are still a trusted ear where others share their private thoughts. Your sense of humor still makes many smile and laugh.

I’m proud of you. You never gave up belief that you could go into long term remission. You continued to give back to Carbone Cancer Center. They listen to you, sort of. You’ve supported their research. You’ve spoken publicly at various functions. I am glad you are working for others in hope they have the same outcome as you. You are a driving force.

I know you’ve worked hard. You’ve had hundreds of treatments and endured even more side effects. You’ve submitted to so many tests and scans so you would have information to plan what’s next. You’ve swallowed supplements and medications that have improved how you feel.  You rejected norms, medians, and negativity from Day 1. You’ve embraced exercise, therapy, affirmations, and surrounded yourself with those who are supportive. You’ve even tried a few crazy things. You’ve worked on having fun and staying hopeful. You made plans. You worked hard.

You look outstanding!

Seriously girl, how do you do it? Cancer ages a person and it did on the inside. Lots of physical things happened on the inside that made you an old lady. And there was a good year during the COVID pandemic where your hair and outward appearance took some punches from tough chemo. Oh, how you loved your yoga pants! You still can’t decide if you’re more gorgeous with white shimmery hair or the more youthful brownish red from the magic bottle. Keep up the good work. You are beautiful.

You still help others. You have found a way to connect with children again and share the love of learning and thinking. Besides being happy and healthy with a few people that love you, it’s really all you ever needed. Hold on to it tightly.

Keep holding on to belief and hope. Never abandon these. They will always serve you well.

I know there are readers who are thinking I’m delusional in writing about my life ten years from now. Researchers can’t put their finger on why some survive for decades with metastatic cancer. What if it’s pure denial? What if it’s the delusion and the denial that got me here? Denial has its merits. I’ll do me.

You are loved by many, including yourself. You’ve tried to return that love to others.

Much love,

Kristie xxx

A favorite photo from spring

This is very similar to another writing activity where the writer sits down, envisions the future, and writes about life ten or twenty years from now envisioning it as well as it possibly can go. There are connections to taking an active role in your life rather than a passive one, setting goals and planning, and daring to dream. I completed this activity about five years ago. It is filled with some very concrete ideas. Retiring with a full retirement package came true much earlier than planned. I was on medical leave, so the writing was on the wall. Writing was mentioned, blogging was not. I’m now well into my third year blogging.

I hope you make the time to write yourself a letter and tuck it away for a decade or so. Time flies. Don’t wait. Happy writing.

Always.

Write What You Know

To write what you know is one of the biggest nuggets of writing advice that comes from authors. It doesn’t matter if the writer is published or unpublished, well-known or obscure, or a beginner or someone highly established. Writing what you know allows the writer to draw upon personal events where details can appear more naturally and make the writing feel more authentic. This advice applies to so much more than just events. We feel a wide spectrum of emotions ranging from euphoric to gut wrenching as we live through these events. Writers know emotions and must write those emotions. I believe this is why we get hooked with a story we feel has nothing to do with our lives. It isn’t the mob lifestyle or unspeakable events from Nazi Germany during WWII that pulls readers into a story. We identify with characters who feel what we feel.

As a teacher teaching second graders, this often meant I read lots of informative pieces on playing with pets, narratives of a summer trip where a flight was as exciting as the destination, and realistic fiction stories about camping, sports, or school. Most kids have fairly similar experiences coming from the same geographic area and being so young. The joy of writing, experiencing success, and becoming more independent writers were always wide-ranging goals in any piece. I wanted kids to write what they knew. Writing about what they didn’t know was a blank page.

It’s the same with me.

As a reader, I look to sources who are experts. Mitch Albom. Sue Monk Kidd. Brené Brown. I go back to favorite authors as well as whomever I’m reading at the moment to reread passages and examine what made them effective. I read like a writer. I love words and storytelling. Even when reading fiction, I understand authors research their topics to make stories credible and realistic. Many factors make writing come alive.

I ask myself, as a writer, what do I know?

Cancer

Unfortunately, I know too much.

My mother had uterine cancer that was successfully removed through surgery. It gave me an early example that disease would always be caught early and without much inconvenience. I recall a couple of years later telling friends she had been diagnosed with breast cancer and that it was going to be harder but that she’d be okay. It was harder. Mom had a partial mastectomy followed by chemotherapy and radiation. I became an expert on her health and breast cancer knowledge. Information was power and I wanted to understand all of it. All was good for years. Golden years.

And then it wasn’t. She wasn’t.

Looking back, I’m not sure if she cared for all my pearls of wisdom that I’d learned. I likely was annoying. It’s very different when the shoe is on the other foot and you have been diagnosed rather than a family member. I want my information but have a bit of an inner attitude when someone who isn’t an authority drops false information at my feet.

My metastatic breast cancer diagnosis came about a month or two later on the heels of hers.

There is a lot I could write about from my experiences with cancer with my mom and from my own. I haven’t mined memories of it with my mom because of the pain. I don’t feel as much pain with my own. I’ve found it to be cathartic and a home to give voice to the pain and whatever other truths need speaking.

Others write from a very factual perspective of their experience. Expert background experience support their writing. They write from legal, medical, patient experience, and personal experience perspectives. Others share raw emotions and reactions to what’s happening in their lives through poems and deeply personal reflections. I tend to write about cancer from the lens of what happens to me and my thoughts about it. Factual information gets sprinkled here and there as it impacts my chosen subject or theme. We’re all invited to sit a while with these perspectives and stories of shared experiences.

Write what you know. I know cancer.

Feelings

Emotions were mentioned at the top of the piece. We all experience universal feelings. Fear. Despair. Loneliness. Humor. Love. Hope. Spirit. A small event of forgetting music at a piano recital can pack some huge emotions of not feeling supported, being humiliated, and hearing your parents lie to you about your achievement. It’s still a tough memory for me. This story can be more powerful than a story that retells a death in the family that is void of emotions. Emotions and feelings spill over in writing because the goal is for someone else to understand and connect with what was written. When I think of a common quality that’s at the core of favorite books, or dare I say even things I write, is the desire to be understood. We crave that as writers and readers.

Feelings are our emotional truths.

Stories of good times on Grandma’s farm help me preserve memories that I want to remember. Her home is a strong example of how emotions create the writing. I took a photo of her farm from out in the field one winter. My grandma, dad, and mom were all warm inside visiting after our Sunday meal. I wrote about how the people I loved were in the photo even though I couldn’t see them as part of an assignment in college. Later, I wrote a poem about it. Years later, this house is in disarray. Raccoons have taken over and hauntingly walk on keys of the damaged piano in the night. A cousin’s son and his wife moved onto the property into the more modern home across the drive when they married. They see the old house as dilapidated and scary (I do too) but more of my emotions are grounded in Sunday visits, time with Grandma, and playing with the farm cats. I sent my cousin’s son a copy of the poem so he could see the abandoned house as a home for a few brief moments.

Write what you know. I know my feelings.

Experiences

Small experiences can have big impacts. I remember winning a cake at a cake walk when I was about six and it was the first thing I ever won. It was a carrot cake with nuts. I was allergic and unable to eat it, but I had won something and felt special. Memories playing at the playground across the street fill many childhood memories. Camping in Girl Scouts. Family vacations. Being bullied. Never knowing if you really fit in. I remember holding my dad’s hand in the ICU and watching it shake trying to find mine after one of his heart surgeries. I have entertaining experiences throwing dinner parties, both fun and disastrous. News of a good scan. Not so good news. There are arguments and celebrations. Little events make a life. Although short, this brief list weaves together experiences with emotions. Most are waiting to be written.

Hope isn’t an experience as much as it is a belief. This belief has been a driving force in some of my experiences and many of my thoughts. Links are provided if you’d like to go back and read past posts. Hope is what I know.

Hope, Belief, and a Monthly Planner

Doom Dibbling or Hope Harvesting

Write what you know. I know my experiences.

Teaching

I know a few things about teaching after twenty-three years in the classroom. Best practices in curriculum and child development have come and gone. Co-workers and students have provided so many stories that you can’t make up. Classic one liners that still make me laugh. One year each child reminded me of a different breed of dog. I loved that class. One year there was a child who had some obvious unidentified emotional issues but who could work quite successfully under his desk. I loved that child as challenging as he was. Another year there was another child who inched her way closer and closer to the door and thought she was hiding. She was a character. I remember mistakes I’ve made like working with glitter as part of projects. I could write about lockdown drills. There is endless material. I can remember where I stood when I learned my dad had died. I know where I was when I got the call that my mom had taken a turn and the end was near. I can bring up the moment where a friend told me she was pregnant. The day I shared with my students I had cancer and couldn’t be with them is still fresh. So many nonteaching things happen within the walls of a school. The things we’d hear if those walls could talk.

I was happy teaching. At times I was frustrated. I felt successful, secure, and safe. Teaching was home.

Write what you know. I know teaching.

I’m not the only one who knows these things.

What do you know?

Cancer Haiku

Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry that usually is about nature themes. It’s written in three lines of five, seven, and five syllables. I find it a beautiful way to create images and stir feelings. Writing it has made me a stronger writer because I must be concise with a finite set of syllables. I often find myself walking around thinking in syllables. I have broadened the scope of my themes when I write haiku to take on personal experiences as I live with metastatic cancer. I offer glimpses into my heart with a bit of that imagery and feeling I’m hoping comes across in seventeen syllables. The more I write, I better I get. I hope you connect with them in your own way.

I answered the phone

the voice said you have cancer

and everything changed

but you look just fine

you can’t be metastatic

you do not act sick

tears on my pillow

tears and sobs in the shower

tears behind a smile

chemo in my veins

chasing after cancer cells

killing good and bad

you’ve stolen my hair

my eyes have a lifeless look

I’m pale, weak, and scared

scars on the outside

reflect little of being

scarred and scared inside

we can land on Mars

and urgently make vaccines

we can’t cure cancer

who is this person

who stares back in the mirror

she looks familiar

the dreaded scanner

I lie inside motionless

hoping for good news

nervous in a gown

waiting for fate to unfold

in the next minutes

we need more research

and more effective treatments

to save those we love

cancer spread elsewhere

is known as metastatic

and cannot be cured

wicked cancer cells

how did this happen to me

how is this my life

cancer side effects

suck everything out quickly

that helps us feel well

sleepless once again

I lie awake unable

to dream something else

positive thinking

balances hope and science

when you have cancer

spring turns to summer

my next season is unknown

I live in the now

petals on a rose

lovely and soft and alive

how long will you stay

bad thoughts creep inside

my heart about when and how

that I push away

dying is rebirth

to where our souls remember

and feel love and light