The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

Plot Summary

Imagine that you were a young woman living some three hundred years ago in France. You had your whole life in front of you when you learned you had to marry a widower with children for the good of the community. You didn’t know this man, nor did you want to marry him. You prayed fervently to the favored gods who answered in the daylight, but you never got a response. All you wanted was more time. Time to discover life. Time to fall in love. Time to explore. The night of the wedding arrives, and you run away into the woods to escape. The dark of night and the trees conceal you.

It’s there that you pray to the gods who answer after dark.

The devil appears and makes a deal with you. Your soul for as much time as you want until you are tired of living. Then he gets your soul.

Addie accepts the deal.

This is the plot of The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V. E. Schwab.

Addie discovers she has plenty of time. Time isn’t her problem. People remember her only for the present moment. If she pays for something and the seller turns his back, she is a stranger and accused of stealing. Portraits can’t be painted of her; photos show a blurred face. No one can know her; no one can love her. One night stands are the best she can have because her gentlemen friends have no idea who she is when they wake up next to her in the morning.

Addie is unable to leave a lasting legacy and she cannot have her image captured.

Interesting concept for a book. I found it original and philosophically engaging. The ending surprised me. I confess I didn’t care for the ending. In my opinion, Addie’s confidence in herself is flawed. The devil character is also flawed, but these flaws are necessary for the book to end where and how the author intended.

Legacies

In real life, we all want to leave some positive mark in the world, just like Addie. Each of us needs to know our life mattered.

This is especially true for those of us living with metastatic breast cancer.

A personal legacy is more than money or property passed on to others. How a person is remembered is also based on their words, actions, and how they lived while alive. I want to be remembered as someone who was kind and giving, who enjoyed life and tried to both live fully and do some good. Hopefully, I’ll be thought of favorably. I’ve said before that I try to lead by example. May those examples be positive. I’d love for hearts to smile when a memory passes their way or something I have left behind is used.

What else is my personal legacy?

Over two decades of my official life as a teacher is how I believe I’ve made the biggest difference. A lot of children passed through my life and were a true gift to me in countless ways. Some parents have let me know that I’m the one who excited their child about writing or books. Others have let me know I really took the time to get to know and understand their child. I hope I imparted a love for learning, asking questions, and to think carefully to solve a problem. Every morning my class would hear me greet them, “Good morning my most wonderful students.” I would nickname every class the class of awesomeness. I personally emphasized kindness as part of the unofficial curriculum because our world needs more empathy.

Those are the things I hope I’ve done through teaching.

I’ve lived with cancer tried to do it with grace and strength and now with more authenticity. I have not just sat down waiting for the worst. At times, I haven’t accepted everything that accompanies cancer. I’ve tried to teach here, too. People see how I’m living. Sometimes they see it’s hard. There are also those who see what they want to see.

Fundraising for more research at UW Carbone was a big accomplishment for me. It was an accomplishment for cancer research, too. A lot of people helped make it happen. Awareness was raised that was connected to action. I take pride in what I did. I am honored that I pulled some new people into the fold so they could learn and become part of something bigger.

Of course, there will be monetary, property, and other assets left behind. My plan is for there to be enough money to continue the small scholarship I give to a graduating high school senior who plans to major in education for many years. There are a few other charitable contributions planned, along with meaningful keepsake items that I consider legacy worthy.

My writing is another part of my legacy. I’ve printed out each post so there is a hard copy. I hope they are preserved. It’s an impressive stack if I must say so. Other than the writing itself are the ideas I’ve written. Some have been very cancer driven pieces where I’ve written about my life with cancer. I’ve written about cancer issues I’ve experienced and how my perceptions have evolved. In a lot of my posts, I’ve worn my feelings on my sleeve. 

Intangible things are also part of my legacy. We can never really know the effect we have on others. Our attitudes and outlook on life has invisible ripples to others.

Invisibility

And then there are the times I’ve felt invisible like Addie LaRue. Times when I’ve felt not seen or heard. Moments where I feel forgotten. I often feel inconsequential. How can I possibly contribute to society? I’m sick, right? The losses I’ve experienced take away my visibility (career, friendships, health, failed treatments, loss of mobility, loss of favorite activities). Each loss adds a layer of invisibility.

But I am not Addie LaRue.

I am Kristie Konsoer.

I have made contributions to society. I have good family and friends and enjoy time with them. I am not invisible. I am seen.