Election 2020 Reflection

Spoiler Alert: I voted for Joe Biden.

November 7, 2020 was an amazingly-wonderful-super-awesome-good-day for America. Yes, that’s how it’s written. I only added the hyphens to make it more readable.

I write this more for myself as a way to preserve my thoughts. It’s a mixture of facts and feelings. I want to remember what I’m feeling and thinking. My opinions are pretty clear. Stop reading now if you are disappointed in the election results. I hope you will read on because a Biden presidency can have positive effects for the cancer community.

Joe Biden will be the 46th president of the United States. Kamala Harris will be the first woman vice president. The race was finally called on Saturday around 10:30 AM (CT) from the national election that was held on Tuesday, November 3rd

The election this year was extremely difficult. No one was sure how long it would take to get results and what would happen after those results became final. Millions voted by mail due to concerns about going to polling places during the COVID-19 pandemic. There were some concerns of violence. There were many attempts of voter suppression in cities that were likely to have a high turnout for Biden. The number of polling sites was reduced out of concerns of virus transmission but interestingly largely in areas that were likely to vote for Biden. I believe that is the real reason. U.S. mailboxes were removed. Votes did not get delivered in time because of illegal activities (in my opinion) by the Trump appointed U.S. postmaster general, Louis DeJoy.

Trump won’t concede. He’s filed lawsuits claiming election fraud. He claims the election was stolen from him. His claims are baseless. There is absolutely no evidence of fraud. Many GOP dominated legislatures wouldn’t let the massive number of mail-in ballots be counted early. Wisconsin was one such state that couldn’t get a head start on counting the number of returned mail-in ballots. There always have been allowances for mail-in ballots to be counted after the election. A high percentage of these ballots were rightly predicted to have been cast for Biden. Trump didn’t want them counted because he said they were late and illegal. Au contraire – they’re legal and cast very early. It is insane that people protested in some states to stop counting votes. Voting is literally what defines a democracy. Pennsylvania pushed Biden over the 270 electoral college threshold he needed to be declared the winner.

Thankfully, Wisconsin voted blue. Ten electoral votes for the Biden column. Truthfully, I struggle to understand how anyone voted for Trump. He wasn’t honest. He ruled like a dictator-child. Presidents aren’t meant to rule like a king or dictator. I heard Senator Mitt Romney (R-Utah) comment on a news program that the election was a referendum of a person and not of conservative principles. His point was conservative principles still exist and that is why republican candidates still did well in states that rejected Trump. He makes a good point. I don’t agree with the examples he cited on the environment, energy, and taxes, but I do see his point. I know I have a friend or two, plus some family members, who likely didn’t vote for Biden. Romney’s comment helps me understand them a bit better, not a lot, but a bit. I find it too hard to overlook Trump’s lack of human decency.

Biden won. Trump lost. The election is over. Finally. We must move forward.

Votes are still being tallied because every vote must be counted. Here are the election results from The Associated Press as of the night of November 8th:

Joe Biden with 75,253,350 votes.  50.7%

Donald Trump with 70,831,493 votes. 47.7%

The people have spoken.

Biden has received the most votes of any presidential candidate in U.S. history. He tried to be president twice before but didn’t receive the democratic nomination. He got it the third time and has won. Maybe he lost those other two times because this is when we need him the most in our country. Our country needs unity and many believe he can bring people together.

Kamala Harris will be the first woman vice president. It’s about time. Little girls are allowed to dream big. Big girls, too. What an incredibly strong role model. She is Black, Indian-American, and has made so many historic firsts in her life. It’s been a hundred years since women won the right to vote. Kamala Harris chose to wear white to recognize that work of suffragists in her acceptance speech. “While I may be the first woman in this office, I won’t be the last,” is one of many shining lines from her speech. America is changing for the better.

What does this mean for cancer? Both Biden and Harris are passionate about cancer research. The soon to be Madam VP’s mother, Dr. Shyamala Gopalan Harris, was a cancer research scientist. President elect Biden’s eldest son Beau died from an aggressive brain tumor known as a glioblastoma multiforme. Cancer doesn’t care who you are or your political affiliation. But it does matter who holds office and it could be transformative to cancer research. A Biden administration is good for the cancer community. Biden and Harris have the potential to prioritize funding and support for cancer research. Both of them will be hearing from me.

The country is still deeply divided. There is racism. There is hate. There are science deniers. There is a lot of entitlement and privilege. People won’t wear masks. Many say they aren’t willing to get a vaccine when available. A lot needs to change.

And yet, I’m hopeful.

I went to one of my favorite places, the UW Arboretum to celebrate the election outcome. There was a middle-aged white man standing on the corner of Mineral Point Road and Segoe Road holding a cardboard Dump Trump sign above his head. I wondered why he’d chosen that message and not one that was more pro Biden or democracy oriented, but I honked gleefully and gave a thumbs up as I waited at the traffic light. The car next to me then honked, too. I’m sure I could find revelers around the Capitol Square if I went there, but I wasn’t looking for large parties or protests.

Across the nation, people celebrated. It resembled a nation-wide block party. Thousands gathered in front of the White House singing and partying. They wore masks, as they should, but it was still a serious risk. They weighed the risk and decided the reward outweighed the risk. They belted out YMCA (so funny this has emerged as a victory song) and Sweet Caroline. Celebrations erupted from coast to coast. Many flooded the streets spontaneously. I saw one video where a crowd danced at a gas station. People looked so unapologetically joyful. New Yorkers banged pots and pans from their windows. Supporters danced and sang in the streets of Philly. I held my own dance party in my family room. I haven’t seen my country this happy for over four years. I am overjoyed.

The world rejoiced. Cathedral bells rang in Paris, France. There were fireworks in London. It says a lot if other countries are excited. I was happy when Angela Merkel and Jacinda Arden were elected to lead Germany and New Zealand, but there were no fireworks or street parties in the U.S. that I know of when that happened. No mass euphoria.

Inauguration Day is January 20, 2021. When Trump was inaugurated, I dubbed January 20, 2017, as a Day of Integrity. It was the one-year anniversary that marked the passing of a friend’s father. I suggested not watching TV coverage that day and watching videos of both of our fathers instead to celebrate our dads. They were good men – men who were loved, men with integrity, and men who are still missed. Our Day of Integrity was a good day. Loving memories replaced some of the sadness. Integrity in the nation will be restored on January 20, 2021. I will watch with pride.