Hiking and Healing in Sedona

Sedona is a place of wonder and striking beauty. I took my first vacation in almost two years there at the beginning of summer. My intentions were to hike and experience the vortex healing that has made the area famous.

The Sedona vortexes are described as swirling centers of energy where the earth seems more alive with energy. Juniper trees grow with twisting trunks as a result of said energy. These vortexes are believed by many to support healing and cleanse negative energies from the body. People go there for mediation, self-reflection, and of course – healing.

Some just enjoy the hikes. There reportedly are around 135 different hikes one can take. I did four; two will be shared here.

Hike #1: Boynton Canyon

I walk and hike at home but found myself thinking my first “easy” Sedona hike as pretty darn hard. Most of it was manageable until the path began to climb upward toward the red rocks of Boynton Canyon. The step-ups were high, comparable to two or three steps on a staircase. The rocks themselves were uneven. My eyes were constantly scanning for an easier path. I used my hands on the rocks to help steady myself as I climbed. I sat on my butt a few times to boost myself up. My balance was alarming. I swayed when standing still. My knees were wobblier than a broken wheel on a bicycle. As I hiked, I oddly felt a strong pull to my right. A quick way down was to my right. Could this be the vortex? Elevation? Just poor balance on my part?

I called my hike done when I made my usual grunts of groans of exasperation. These are one of my signs that I need to stop doing what I’m doing. My friend finished climbing to where we decided we’d stop to meditate. I perched upon a giant rock and drank some water. I quickly switched to my Gatorade for something stronger. It usually perks me up and it did its job. After a brief rest, I too finished the climb.

I found another rock for a good rest. I looked out over the canyon and then to my right where the rocks tried to touch the sky. After a bit, I closed my eyes. Focused on my breath. Waited for something. Guidance. A sense of that universal energy. Nothing happened. I chose to focus on words that struck me as significant in that moment – balance and healing. Over and over, my mind slowly repeated these words. Something happened. My heart felt a slow warmth taking over inside. I felt a smile spread across my face and just basked in the feeling. Connection to something bigger than myself is an extraordinary feeling.

The return route was easier even though I still lowered myself down a few of those big steps on my butt.

Hike #2: Oak Creek

Oak Creek was the next day’s hike. It is mainly flat (yay) and shaded (double yay). The creek burbles along the base of Cathedral Rock. Cathedral rock has a portion that is described as a near vertical climb. We agreed we didn’t need this experience. The vortex was supposedly strongest at the end of the trail.

The sound of the creek refreshed me. Never would I have guessed Arizona could remind me of home. I felt like I was walking in parts of Pheasant Branch. The water was deeper here and flowed faster. After a good walk, we each settled into our own areas to meditate. It was deeply peaceful, but I didn’t experience any sense of a strong energy.

This trail required we retrace our steps to get back to our starting point. Halfway back, I began to experience a sharp pain on my right side where my liver is located. Hello cancer. Or hello energy? Somewhere I had read that you might feel discomfort of old injuries as healing worked. The pain vanished in a couple of minutes.

Then there was the snake. A beautiful nonvenomous snake stretched its full length (4 feet or so) as it crossed in front of us. If I see snakes back home in Pheasant Branch, they are small little things that you could easily step on before seeing them. Not this snake. I could have wrapped it around my waist and tied it like a belt. I was cautiously mesmerized by this friend. I learned snakes are symbols of transformation and healing. There’s a snake curled around a rod often seen in medical settings. It is associated with Asklepios, known as the ancient mythical god of medicine.

Was it a coincidence that I felt pain on this hike?

Was it a coincidence that shortly thereafter I saw a snake?

Was it healing?

I don’t believe in coincidences.

Time will tell. Time won’t tell if healing is attributed to the energy of the vortexes, my current cancer drug, or both.

Do I feel healed?

Yes. I felt GOOD in Sedona! Remarkably and unbelievably well. Many factors contribute to healing. I feel healed. And I’m going to hold tightly to that feeling.

Always.