Patient and Family Advocacy

Patient and Family Advisory Councils connect patients and family members with employees in the healthcare system. Members provide input on how to improve the patient and family experience in a specific area. PFAC is the shortened name for these groups. Patients and family members who have been caregivers for patients are called PFAs.

PFACs are a way for providers to gain viewpoints from the perspectives of those on the receiving end of care. Participating in patient and family advisory committees gives patients and family members the opportunity to become advocates for their own health care and that of others. It is also an opportunity to give back and stay involved in the health community.

I joined a PFAC oncological group in the spring of 2015. It focuses on any aspect of oncology and welcomes participants who have been affected by any kind of cancer as a patient or family member who has received care in the UW Health system. My understanding of what happens on more of a business level of health care has been deepened. Surveys are often used to gather and then aggregate information from PFAC members ahead of scheduled meetings. I have completed many. There usually is a guest presenter on a topic.

Truthfully, I often feel as though final decisions have already been made and the purpose of patient/family input is simply to agree with what is being presented. As a result, I often feel somewhat disagreeable when I say something different from what I think they want to hear. Yet, I’m not there to make them feel good and/or validate their work. I’m there to offer my honest feedback and to advocate for the best patient-centered care possible. I’ve also gleaned a few insights into possible options from which I could benefit. Those are added benefits to my participation.

I am one of two members in my group who receives care at a building outside of the hospital that offers cancer treatment in a smaller setting. I find smaller is much more personalized and this is the right choice for me. I am also the only member of the ENTIRE group who is under current treatment. It strikes me as odd. I would think there would be a higher need to recruit current patients for input when it’s THEIR CARE being discussed. My status gives me a unique perspective where I can lend my voice to what I currently experience and my observations.

I thought some readers might be interested in some of the topics we’ve discussed over the past four years. I do not feel I am violating any privacy policies by sharing in general terms. I will not refer to anyone by name. My purpose is to provide a glimpse into the world of Patient and Family Advisory Councils. Sure, I have some opinions and they are mine to share. I am confident you’ll know those when you read them.

The following are a few of the PFAC topics that have been discussed:

Clinical Trials

  • A speaker was brought in to present information with an accompanying PowerPoint. The presentation on clinical trials was largely informative. Time was spent providing feedback on the cancer center’s website dedicated to trials. Feedback was solicited on how to raise awareness of and participation in clinical trials, and discuss reasons why patients may not choose to be involved in them.
  • I perceived the hospital perspective was that patients often do not want to be involved in trials. I believe there are reasons that validate that perception. Personally, I would not choose to be involved in one if I may be in a group that is not receiving the strongest medicine available as compared to another group. It’s too big of a risk for me. Many trials are changing so all patients in a trial receive the drug being tested. If patients understand that, then participation may rise.
  • Trials have also become very specific because of targeted treatments. Often times, it’s the trial sponsors who have restrictions that exclude interested patients because patients do not fit a sponsor’s requirements for the ideal sick patient. Patients are too sick, not sick enough, or something else. Patients would like the opportunity to participate (and potentially greatly benefit), but they are told they cannot. In the end, it’s the sponsor rejecting the patient, not the other way around.

Chemotherapy Preparation

  • One evening, oncological pharmacists presented information on why patients wait so long for their chemotherapy drugs. There have been days I’ve waited three hours from the time after an office visit until my drug drips into my body. It takes considerable time to make chemotherapy for an infusion. Pharmacists can’t make it until the oncologist has released the order for it. This is dependent on the patient’s office visit and dictated by results from labs looking at blood counts and metabolic functions. Kidney function, white cell counts, liver enzymes, and other numbers or functions out of kilter could delay or cancel a treatment. Each drug is made specifically for a patient. Dosing is specific to a patient’s needs and once made it can’t be used on another patient if the intended patient is unable to use it. It expires after about twenty-four hours. Money is lost if it goes unused. My blood boils a bit at this economic consequence because in my world patient care outranks profit every single time. Hiring more pharmacists would lessen the time a patient has to wait. Patients would get what they need more quickly. An on-site facility to make the chemo would be helpful, but apparently this isn’t deemed essential. Again, financial factors are at the root of these decisions. My blood pressure can only climb because of them. Don’t mind me, I’m just a patient.

Genetics Clinics

  • On another evening, a presenter gave an overview of genetic counseling and progress in identifying genetic markers that increase a person’s cancer risk.
  • The benefits of DNA banking were shared. I was somewhat unimpressed as it seemed the biggest benefit would be to the company providing this service. DNA banking is an option available outside of genetic counseling. Many questions float around in my head concerning how my DNA would be used.

Appointment Scheduling

  • At first, this didn’t seem like a terribly pressing topic, certainly not one to take an entire PFAC meeting to discuss. But it did.
  • The chemotherapy managers and oncology directors were gathering input on which patients needed to be seen by oncologists and which patients could be seen more routinely by nurse practitioners. Who was considered urgent? I get good information and a slightly different perspective when I see my nurse practitioner, however, I will always prefer to see my oncologist over her. He has more expertise.
  • Other members in the group nodded their heads and quickly agreed that this was a great idea to see a nurse practitioner more frequently. It isn’t from my perspective. This is where my situation as a current patient is so important. Doesn’t every cancer patient think his or her care is urgent? I am just as urgent and as important as another patient. It seemed to me like some patients were being labeled as more valued than others. The thought was perhaps patients who were further out post-treatment could be seen by a nurse practitioner if they only came in once a year. Well, no, these patients need to be seen by an oncologist, too. Recurrence happens even when patients have passed a five-year cancer-free benchmark. I’ll say it again: the oncologist has more expertise. A nurse practitioner may miss something that an oncologist may notice.

New Clinic Design Planning

  • A new campus is being designed on the far-east side of Madison. An interior designer presented current design plans that were extremely comprehensive and detailed. I was impressed with what is being planned. The plans are patient-centered and inclusive to coordinate many aspects of care in one setting.
  • Input was sought after for any aspect of this clinic. I felt the designer presenting genuinely considered all comments were important whether they were about parking lot locations to what kind of treatment room options would be enjoyed or needed (open, semi-private, or private). I seemed like the lone voice expressing how important private treatment rooms were for patients. As a patient, I have intensely private discussions about my health with my treatment nurse while receiving treatment. I don’t want to share that information with others, nor do I want to hear their confidential conversations. HIPAA laws exist to protect patient health information. I expressed very strongly that privacy must be ensured in treatment areas. I was thankful someone agreed with me who had called in for the meeting. Even if privacy were not a concern, cancer patients have compromised immune systems and should not be sharing space with others or others’ family members who are sick and may or may not be showing symptoms of a virus.

The recommendation in my group is to serve in a PFAC group for five years and then make room for someone else. I don’t know how closely that guideline is followed; some members in the group have been there more than five years already. I do enjoy the other members who have been former patients or caregivers for family members. Everyone brings something different to the table. We volunteer our time because we feel we can make a difference. We all advocate for the same thing – the best care for patients.

Consider responding:

  • Have you ever advocated for change in your health care or that of a family member? How? What happened?

 

Patient Rights and Raising the Bar

An oncologist, radiologist, and surgeon all walk into a bar. Each was feeling frustrated because each felt he was more responsible than the other in successfully eradicating a patient’s cancer. In the midst of their heated discussion, a nearby bar stool swiveled to reveal the very patient they were debating (it was a juice bar). “You all have been a vital part in my healing, but I AM the most important factor in healing my cancer.” Each doctor was struck speechless, whereupon the patient treated each to a nutrient and antioxidant rich green smoothie.

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Image credit: pixabay.com

I’m feeling fired up today about many, many things related to health care.

Do you realize how empowered you are? YOU are the common factor that ties your specialists together. Good communication is key. Sure, they discuss your care without you, but you get to integrate that information together. It needs to make sense to you. It affects you the most. YOU are the one who has sought out complementary treatments and again the person fitting all these pieces of your health puzzle together. YOU have done the research and made informed decisions. They all work for you and your interests. YOU are the CEO of your team. That’s powerful.

A lot is being done TO you. You may feel out of control. You have rights. Knowing your rights is empowering.

  • Having complete and accurate information from your doctor about your diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis tops the list.
  • As a patient, you are entitled to privacy regarding your medical care and records.
  • You have the right to quality care and treatment consistent with available resources and standards of treatment.
  • You have a right to refuse treatment and be informed about the consequences of that decision.
  • You have the right to care and treatment in a safe environment.
  • Another big right is that you have the right to considerate and respectful care.

I want to add two additional patient rights.

One: The right to demand more research and more effective treatments for advance stage cancer.

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Image credit: pixabay.com

It seems to be an idea I keep repeating over and over. Tell your oncologist, radiologist, and surgeon. Make phone calls and write letters to administrators of treatment centers and hospitals. Find a researcher who would love to give you a tour of their lab and share what is being worked on.

I think this is a great way to create a direct line to the front line.

It also provides a face to the work the researchers do, even though I think many researchers went into their chosen profession because of loved ones who’ve been lost to illness. Every new face can continue to motivate researchers.

Touring a research lab certainly will better my understanding of work being done. It’s on my list of things to do. Spread the word to non-medical people (family, friends, coworkers, followers, etc.) so they can spread the word on the urgent need for more research for advance cancer. When more people speak up and demand more, and keep demanding more, there is a better chance that people will get more. I ask for more all the time.

Two: The right to have more equality and power with pharmaceutical and drug companies.

I feel this is an uphill battle but one worth having because those needing drugs are humans with feelings and deserve whatever can help them feel better. This one relates a lot to the aforementioned right to CONSIDERATE and RESPECTFUL CARE. It is neither when you are treated like you don’t matter or are insignificant. THEY are there for ME, not the other way around. Too often the latter is the norm. I could easily throw insurance companies to the mix.

I am tired of feeling exhausted with efforts to make a positive difference, but I will keep working to do so for myself and for others. I am so sick of arguing and jumping through hoops for what I deserve in order to be well. I have mentioned this point in earlier posts: I’m well enough to argue for myself and hoop jump, but what about the patients who are physically too tired or weak to do so? Those who are sick are vulnerable just like any other powerless or marginalized segment of society. Take your pick – there are plenty of “others” in society. They are discounted. Laws and policies do not work in their favor.

Here’s more depressing news – the cancer the specialists argued about eradicating in the beginning of the post may not have been eradicated. It should be part of the complete and accurate information you get from a doctor about a cancer diagnosis and prognosis. 30% of cases recur or may metastasize. Unfortunately, it could still be lurking, biding its time. A new cancer can also grow. You, being extremely empowered, need to know this is a possibility. You, being extremely empowered, need to stay vigilant in understanding your risks and the red flags that may suggest secondary cancer. I apologize in advance if the following freaks people out. It freaks me out, too, but I feel it needs to be shared. Jo Taylor is the founder of After Breast Cancer Diagnosis and a patient advocate living with secondary breast cancer. She can be found on Twitter @abcdiagnosis and her website is abcdiagnosis.co.uk.  The graphic below (used with permission) illustrates warning signs that should be on everyone’s radar.

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Years ago, I felt a little tired but just chalked it up to the demands of my job. A lot was going on personally for me as well. These things could very well have been why I felt tired. Many people are fatigued who do not have cancer. Cancer was the farthest thought from my mind. I have no idea of knowing for sure.

Although the above symptoms pointing to a reality (or possible reality) for some is depressing or upsetting, knowledge is power.

Let’s talk about the term healing. Semantics can be tricky. Healed cancer, treatable cancer, cured cancer. Can you be healed without being cured? I think the answer is yes. Healed is more of an element of mind and spirit. Healed and cured are probably the most synonymous. You can be healed and still have treatable cancer. You can be healed and have curable cancer. You can be cured, but not healed. And you can not be healed while having treatable cancer. I still hold fast to the idea that you are the most important factor in your healing as you have to decide what you are going to allow and how it works for you.

It’s time to get back to the doctors who walk into the bar. They may continue to argue. They may nod politely at your declaration. Perhaps they believe you. When you assert that you are the most important factor in your healing, you raise the bar of expectation in doctor-patient relationships. You change how you are perceived. You may even change the treatments offered to you. Maybe you find something that is a possibility for you that your doctor hadn’t considered. You are important. You matter. Your voice matters. The bar is important.

A patient, researcher, and leader all walk into a bar. Here’s the punch line: They are all the same person . . . you. Being an active member on your cancer care team ensures that no aspect of your care is taken for granted. Your team is accountable to you, as it should be. And here’s even more good news: The oncologist, radiologist, and surgeon have been waiting for you. They wave and welcome you to your seat at the table.

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Image credit: pixabay.com

Consider responding:

  • How do you feel you are a part of your team for your health?
  • Are there any other rights you’d like to add to your personal list of patient rights?