Three Rules to Get Biking Again

One sunny day in early April, I decided it was time to pump up the tires on my bike and take it out for a test run. Truth be told, it was just as much of a test run for me, too.

Every year I wonder how I’m going to fare with many of my sportier endeavors. Will I still be able to hike? Can I bike? Am I slower? How far can I go? What kind of energy level will I have? Will I be able to maintain it? Lots of questions bombard my mind, and I can’t answer any of them until I get out there and see what happens. I visualize doing all my physical goals effortlessly and flawlessly. Visualizing success is a healthy practice. It can frustrate me when I don’t visualize the small steps to reach my goal, but I’m getting better, slowly.

Last summer biking was tougher for me. Little changes in incline bothered me and I fatigued too quickly from the extra exertion. If I rode too far, the final stretch was interrupted with lots of rest stops. It always happened in the second half of the ride. I ended rides thoroughly exhausted feeling like an old crump. The strength and cardio work I had done in other activities didn’t transfer over to biking. Last summer was hard.

Each year it feels like I’m starting over.

I held one rule heading into this spring’s inaugural ride: Easy Does It.

I biked close to home and biked around the neighborhood. Any hills were neither steep nor long. I was ready for home after only fifteen minutes. My goal was thirty minutes, so I kept pedaling, thinking of flat routes that wouldn’t challenge me. I kept talking to myself, repeating my rule to take it easy. There was no need to push. I’ve had a tendency to push myself hard. Pushing too hard is what caused some of the hardness and disappointments last summer in the biking and hiking departments. On the other hand, sometimes I’ve had to push hard to be heard, to assert myself at school, or to travel places. No one else was going to do the work for me, nor should they.

Here on my bike, I didn’t have to go fast. Easy does it. Take my time. Remember to breathe. Coasting offered welcomed breaks to reset and normalize my breathing.

A couple other rules took shape on my test ride.

Rule #2: Enjoy It.

On that particular day, I was just out to get my bearings. I needed to do some self-assessment. I enjoy a good pace if I can handle it, but I bike more for recreation. I am not interested in doing a Tour de France. If the ride became too hard and I wasn’t having any fun, I was less likely to do it again. I do hobbies I enjoy, not those I despise.

There are plenty of parts of my life (medical parts) that I do not enjoy. I am very intentional about my choices with the rest of it. Having fun is part of my well-being.

I love biking on Wisconsin’s bike trails. There are some beautiful routes that pass alongside farms, woods, and prairies. My favorite provides a perfect mixture of sun and shade.

Rule #3: Practice Makes Perfect.

The more I practice, the better I get. It was a small sign of encouragement that stayed up as a permanent poster in my classroom for years. I will build on each small success and every ride. Greatness takes time. Professional athletes train for years to make hard work look effortless and flawless. I forget this often when so many of my attempts are filled with concerted effort and countless flaws. Failing is tough. Failing teaches us how to be better and stronger. Failing is valued practice, and practice makes perfect.

Here’s the thing – I don’t need perfection. For my purposes, I’ll define perfect as being fit enough to do the long bike rides I want with confidence and strength. It means I will enjoy the ride and relish in greatness when I get it. Repetition and practice bring me what I need for happiness, not perfection.

Maybe the saying about practice needs to shift from making something perfect to bringing happiness.

These three rules got me biking again. They will work for me when I go out on my next several rides. I hope they can help anyone who is ready to embark on a new physical activity. Maybe it doesn’t even need to be anything physical. Any new activity would work. Easy does it. Slow down and don’t go too fast or push too hard. You’ll get where you’re going. Things have a way of working out. It’s okay to take your time and get something right.

Life is meant to be enjoyed. I don’t believe we are here to be unhappy or to suffer. I want to take every opportunity for happiness that comes my way. I will seek out happiness. Some parts of life come easily. Hopefully, many things are easy. There undoubtedly will be a few flops ranging from tiny to colossal, but mine have taught me needed lessons. I keep practicing. Life is a mixture of enjoyment and practice.

I finished my ride and reached my thirty-minute goal. My body felt more than ready to be done. I worked hard, but I could still walk, talk, and otherwise function normally. All good signs I didn’t overdo. I have learned (through failure) that it’s good to stop physical activity before it stops me. My energy level was so good I even tackled a couple of tasks outdoors before heading inside.

My test run was very successful. My bike worked fine and so did I. Going on that ride made me feel empowered. There was a strong sense of accomplishment that left me feeling refreshed and energized. I had control of something in my life. I had forgotten how good I (eventually) feel after a bike ride. My heart felt stronger and each breath was fuller and deeper. I felt more confident to handle other challenges.

I still need to figure out how to handle some fatigue issues. My anxiety button gets pushed too quickly when pedaling becomes hard. Then anxiety pushes my panic button. Hopefully, my “Easy Does It” reminder will kick in at these times and keep panic far away.

Time has passed and now it’s June. I can bike from home to do a couple short bike trails. My next step is to put the rack on my car so I can do rides that gradually lengthen. As long as they remain relatively flat my enjoyment level will stay high. I plan to enjoy many beautiful rides that make me feel fit and healthy throughout the long summer.

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Here I am taking a break on my favorite trail in 2017.

Consider responding:

  • How do you apply Easy Does It?
  • What are some guiding rules for your life?

 

Invisible Crutches and Hiking

Summer arrived right on time. Last weekend brought a picture perfect day. Little clouds scattered themselves across the blue sky. Green leaves danced on tree branches, delighted with the sunshine. Green grass swayed in the warm breeze. Frogs on the ground sang to one another but still went unseen. Birds called out to each other from branches with their song. Everything was fully alive again.

I went for a hike in Pheasant Branch Conservancy.

I enjoy hiking there for many reasons. Sometimes I enjoy the shade and protection of the trees in woodland areas. When phlox blooms, it can almost completely cover some places in shades of purple and white glory. Other parts are wide-open prairie. The watershed is of particular interest to people and wildlife alike. The area even has geothermal springs.

I love the hill the most. It offers unparalleled views of the watershed as well as of the Capitol building in the distance. It’s never crowded. After the climb and I’m on top looking out at the conservancy wetlands, I take a well-deserved rest for a few moments. I’ve even done warrior pose on the lookout platform to remind myself of my strength and celebrate my accomplishment.

The path leading to the top had been closed earlier in spring because it was too wet to have people hiking it. My understanding was there was a mix of safety concerns for walkers and also concerns to protect the trail from damage caused by people stomping all over it before it had hardened from the spring thaw.

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Part of Pheasant Branch Conservancy

My hike last weekend held challenges for me. I didn’t know if the hill path was going to be accessible or not, so I parked my car farther away so I could do a long quality walk if it wasn’t open. My hike wound up being a little longer than I wanted and I got hotter than I hoped. I don’t function well when I overheat. I was warm from the start but I refused to wimp out on the first truly warm day when there would be months of summer heat ahead of me. I enthusiastically convinced myself this was conditioning and I could do it.

I could do it, albeit not very enthusiastically or convincingly.

I discovered the hill path was open and thought I could manage it. I wanted to make it to the top. It’s never been terribly steep or long. However, my walk was plenty long already not including the hill. The ground was still muddy from recent rain in a few spots. There always are uneven parts and I need to watch my footing. I had about five minutes or less left to reach the top when I decided I should turn around and make sure I had ample energy to get back to my car. A tinge of disappointment tugged at my heart, but I know my body well. It was time to head back. I knew I would come back soon.

On my trek down, I met a man going up. He was about my age, give or take a few years. He hiked on crutches. He wore a boot on his left foot like you’d see on someone who had had surgery or had injured his foot. A smile on his face exuded cheer.

I didn’t need to see this man. Or maybe I did.

Crutch Man was obviously fit and strong. I was amazed by how steady he appeared. The nearest parking lot was already a good distance away to have traveled on crutches. Here he was taking on a climb. I marveled at his confidence. I wanted the kind of will power he possessed. It appeared like this hill was no big deal to him. It was too big of a deal for me to push myself with two strong legs and on two feet. The image of him accomplishing something that I wasn’t doing stuck with me for the rest of my walk. It stuck around for the rest of the day.

I felt I had invisible crutches.

How did he manage? What kind of mindset did he have? How could I get it? What was the lesson for me to learn?

Crutch Man, if you’re by chance reading this, I’d love to talk and ask you these questions directly.

What’s easy for one person is challenging for another and vice versa. I imagine I do (or have done) things that others can’t fathom. Teaching a room full of second graders could fall into that category. Living well with cancer could be another. I deal with a lot of medical stuff. I travel on my own. I support myself. We all have something.

Crutches are there to support you while you need help, not keep you less mobile indefinitely. Someone wouldn’t use physical crutches longer than what was needed. Invisible crutches are often used longer than necessary. They are comfortable and safe. They can’t be seen so the owner may not fully realize they are even using them. They are that little voice that nags we better not do “x” for any number of excuses but most of all because then there would be no use for the crutches anymore.

What are other names for invisible crutches people have that are harmful rather than helpful?

Fear

There is fear of being hurt, physically or emotionally. There is fear of rejection. Fear of failure is a big one. Failures only keep us from success if we don’t try again. Fear of change is another possibility.

Getting rid of this invisible crutch lets you live more boldly. What if you don’t meet a goal on the first try? So what? I see two possibilities. You try again or move on. What if everything does go as hoped? Wonderful! Do not fear success. Abandon worries and enjoy your moment in the sun.

Comparison

Comparison is an invisible crutch if you compare yourself unfavorably to a colleague at work, another’s diagnosis, progress, another relationship, or some type of success that you haven’t experienced. There seldom is enough information to make a valid comparison. Why do we do this? I know I’m not the only one. Getting to the top of the hill may have been a goal of Crutch Man’s for some time. Perhaps he had been chunking together small successes for months. Maybe he is part bionic. I have no idea. I don’t know his story. The story I initially told myself was he was better than me and I must be a loser. He very well could have been more capable than me at that moment, but I am definitely NOT a loser.

I know I can hike the hill. I just can’t hike the hill, include a long walk, and do a little gardening all on one hot day (which is what I tried). People are always comparing themselves to others with results that usually find they don’t measure up. I need to stop. Who’s with me? The only thing I need to compare myself to is my own progress. Even then it’s silly because comparing myself to the “me” of my past doesn’t help with the “me” of my present.

Live in the now and forget about comparing.

Limiting Beliefs

Limiting beliefs and negative self-talk get you nowhere. They may cause regression. If you think you can’t do something, you probably can’t. If you think small, you may be successful but you might not fulfill your potential.

If you think you can, you may very well succeed. If not, you will learn something that will help you move toward your goal. A positive mindset propels you toward success. An “I can” attitude goes a long way, even if you aren’t entirely sure. How I see myself as a success or failure is part of my identity. I choose to see myself as a winner.

Others

A few of those limiting beliefs may be opinions others have thrust upon you. I have gotten a lot better at not listening to these, but one creeps in every once in a while. Then it’s harder to give it the boot. I was told earlier this week I couldn’t do something. I did it.

Focus on those around you who are supportive. These helpers are not crutches. They are the ones who teach you to fish rather than give you fish. They teach you how to do something rather than do it for you. They encourage instead of criticize. They pick you up, dust you off after you fall, and tell you to keep trying.

Status Quo

Sometimes an invisible crutch is that everything is just fine. Nothing needs to change. Why push to hike a hill when flatlands are much easier? Why make life harder? Life is plenty hard already.

True, but without the hill, I don’t get the panoramic view. I don’t get to be where Native Americans chose as a location for burial grounds long ago. I don’t get the feeling of satisfaction I get from many things when I don’t do the work. Being at the top is worth the effort.  The view is worth the work.

Crutch Man wasn’t there to show me up and make me feel sad about turning back early. I may not have encountered him at all had I kept going and looped around the top of the hill before heading back down.

I was supposed to see him.

He reminded me I am stronger than I think I am.

Sometimes I forget.

He was there to show me if he could do it, so could I.

Thanks, Crutch Man, whoever you are.

You keep being you.

I’ll be me.

Walk on.

 

Exercise and Nutrition

A quote from the 2014 documentary Fed Up concisely sums up how diet and exercise must be thought of as partners in health: “You can’t diet your way out of a sedentary lifestyle. You can’t exercise your way out of a bad diet.”

It seems likely that someone who watches what they eat probably also has an active lifestyle. Eating right and moving around just helps you feel better and fuels your fun. Raw or steamed broccoli is better than a bag of chemical chips. Taking a walk around the pond is better than sitting on my duff watching TV or even, ahem, blogging.

Exercise

I am not athletic. Attempts at running were always short-lived and caused me minor injury in the past. But I love to walk outdoors. Going to the UW-Arboretum or Pheasant Branch Conservancy takes care of my heart, lets me decompress, and promotes creativity. Once I build up a little endurance, I also enjoy biking. Gardening, yard work, mowing the lawn, shoveling snow, and anything functional in the line of caring for my home all count and provide that undeniable feeling of self-satisfaction.

Moving needs to become second nature. My Fitbit has helped me monitor how much I move (or don’t move) on a daily basis. Before that, I wrote down how many miles I walked in a journal. It’s important to find a way to be accountable. A while back I read that making goals wasn’t enough, but a person needed to take goals a step further and make plans. Wanting to walk more is all very nice. Scheduling to walk in the arboretum helps turn the very nice into a reality. Saying I’m going to bike more means nothing if I don’t make sure my bike is ready to go and I make the effort to do it.

Hiking is one of my favorite activities. Hiking gets me out in nature with fresh air, blue sky, and lots of trees. Getting lost in my thoughts and really giving myself time to think away from other distractions always provides me with new insight. There is something amazing that happens in my brain when I pair physical and mental work together. My brain works better and thoughts are clearer. Physically, hiking has a long list of health benefits including improved cardio and muscular fitness, lowering risks of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and triglycerides, and also lowering risks of cancers like colon and breast cancer. It’s a great aerobic workout. Hiking also can provide better sleep quality, reduce depression, and lower your risk of an early death. Being active in general tends to lower the risk of death. Honestly. How not surprising. Psychologically, hiking can provide feelings of relaxation and well-being. Sunshine, fresh air, trees, and feelings of accomplishment all feed into better mental health.

Exercise is important for everyone, but keeping it as part of a daily routine is one of my priorities as someone trying to live well with cancer. There definitely are times I would rather sit through a dental cleaning or a foreign film without subtitles than exercise. When I’m already feeling fatigued as a side effect from treatment, it seems crazy to purposely choose to do something that will make me feel more tired. Strangely though, this is not the case. Exercise combats fatigue. I feel tired after exercising, but it’s a different kind of tired than fatigue. I have more energy after I recover from however I’ve chosen to exercise. The energy sticks around a while. Regular exercise has also been connected to increasing survival rates for women with breast cancer. I want to stay alive, hence I exercise every day.

What about when fatigue isn’t the problem? What if it’s physical pain that’s preventing movement? I experienced this the other weekend with aggravated inflammation and muscle soreness from an injection that caused deep hurt with every step. I fought through most of that day trying to find a way to keep fun plans I had that night to go to a concert. I missed my daily workout because I couldn’t exercise through the pain. I could barely walk. I don’t think exercising when you hurt is a safe idea. Pain is a solid stop sign. The up side to my story is I was prescribed some strong medication to help make my evening of fun possible. I still hurt but there were moments I forgot. The down side is the meds made me puke profusely by the next evening. It took days before I moved well again. I’m not pushing activity and I’m definitely not taking any more of those pills. My body will let me know what I can do.

How much exercise does a person need daily? The current guidelines from the Department of Health and Human Services recommend that healthy adults get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic exercise (activity that produces a sweat). That’s a mere twenty-two minutes a day when broken down daily. Strength training is suggested at least two times a week. Click here for a short article provided by Mayo Clinic on these recommendations.

Nutrition

After getting through six months of initial chemotherapy in 2012, I needed to make changes in my diet. It’s still hard because of my love affair with sugar. Ideally, I should probably also be a vegetarian, but I love cheeseburgers too much. I try to keep these in check and enjoy them when I eat them. For me, a healthy diet consists of less meat, less processed foods, no alcohol, less sugar, more plant-based proteins, and more fish. More of a plant-based diet in general is a healthy winner. I order a steak about once a year on vacation, but even that is waning because of how I feel after eating it. I eat a lot of fish. My breakfast used to be a fairly tasty blend of five fruits and vegetables in my Nutri-bullet. What I thought was extremely healthy was also providing far too many natural sugars and unknowingly raising my A1C. Now I’ve switched to breakfasts that usually consist of eggs, half an avocado, and one fruit. The avocado cuts the natural sugar from the fruit.

One area in nutrition I’ve been more successful in is eliminating dairy. I miss milk. I love milk. However, it contains casein, a protein that promotes cancer growth in any stage. I know some who have read widely on this and disagree on whether that is true or not. My current feeling is I really don’t have much wiggle room to disagree. It is potentially more beneficial to me to avoid milk than to drink it. There is no dietary reason to consume milk produced by another animal. Calcium can come from plant-based proteins such as quinoa, brown rice, oatmeal, white beans, kale, and collard greens. With all that said, I still will enjoy ice cream now and again, maybe a little more than I should. I like string cheese. I slip every so often and have cereal with milk. It tastes awesome, but it can’t become regular diet. I grew up and live in Wisconsin, also known as The Dairy State. Clearly, there is room for improvement in cutting out more foods made with milk. Did I mention I really love ice cream?

I have also added an Omega low-speed, masticating juicer to extract all the vitamins, enzymes, and minerals in their purest and rawest form to provide the highest juice yield. Kale, spinach, celery, cucumber, and green apples make the most gorgeous green juice I’ve ever seen, and it’s also very refreshing. The color green is both a healing and energizing color. Green juice is a great way to send oxygen and needed nutrition to unhealthy cells. Unhealthy cells don’t like oxygen. Too bad, I’m very fond of oxygen. I get to choose, not the other way around.

Both exercise and nutrition need to work in tandem together to get the best results. I am a firm believer that everyone can do something. One person’s exercise or nutritional needs are different from what someone else needs. For example, most people are supposed to get what vitamins and minerals they need from eating a healthy diet and not need these in supplement form. I take a lot of supplements because treatments make it harder for my body to absorb some things. I also still feel a bit down when I look at people hitting the pavement or trails on their bike who look like they are practically flying. I have to work hard to achieve even a slow speed. It takes time for me to build any true endurance. I do the best I can.

Click here to read the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines provided by Mayo Clinic. I don’t agree with all the recommendations, but it does force me to justify my choices. As I mentioned in an earlier post, sometimes I feel like there is so much conflicting information on what healthy nutrition means that it’s hard not to drive myself nuts. I look for overlapping ideas from multiple sources.

I try to make the right choices for me in how I move and what I put into my body. I can’t just do one or the other to be healthy. I can’t compare my needs to anyone else’s either. Everyone has individual preferences, routines, and needs. I do learn a lot from others who share what they know when I ask for their wisdom.

My hope is that we all find a way to eat well and move well.

Consider responding:

  • What are some of your favorite healthy foods?
  • How do you enjoy moving?