Cancer Hospital Stay

Sometimes relatively simple surgeries have complexities. One test can turn into two tests. A bright spot in my hospital getaway was I got results from surgeries and tests immediately or the same day.

Removing my leaking port would be categorized as a simple surgery. Ports are removed using conscious sedation or local anesthesia. The plan for me was to have a bedside removal in my room on my second day in the hospital. I would be awake. The area would be numbed. My surgeon would make a small incision at the port site, remove the port, and guide the catheter that was threaded into a vein out through the same incision by pulling it out. It would only take around ten minutes from making the cut to finishing. Prep would put everything closer to an hour.

Simple.

My surgeon, an assistant, and my assigned nurse at the time arrived in the morning for the bedside removal. I silently thanked my port for serving me well and was ready for action. My right shoulder and right chest area were exposed, cleansed, and then I was fully draped accordingly so that only the port area was visible. What I wasn’t expecting was that my face would be draped as well. I had on my mask, I couldn’t see, and was definitely not thinking about my slight claustrophobic tendencies. My breathing was remarkably even and calm.

Lidocaine injections were given to numb the port area. I felt nothing.

I was kept abreast (not sorry) of what was going on at my request. The cutting began. There was bleeding. I heard the word hyperemic several times with the implication that I was extremely hyperemic. I didn’t know what that meant. Afterwards, I looked it up and learned hyperemia is an excess of blood in the vessels to an organ or other body part.

At this point, I inserted a joke I had come across earlier in the day into the discussion. I don’t know what compelled me. I think I had a need to remind them I was there. “Do you know why ants don’t get sick? Give up? They have antibodies.” The assistant and nurse laughed. I have no excuse for my sense of humor because I wasn’t sedated. I found it fit a hospital setting well.

I thought it was funny.

It seemed that my being extremely hyperemic meant it was harder to get to my port. I heard more cutting and snipping sounds. Then my surgeon announced he was cauterizing the area. An electric tool began to buzz. I felt heat. I was being burned.

Seconds later came the smell of burning meat. Holy something, that was me being barbequed. My senses weren’t expecting that. Fascinating and also unsettling. I later learned that the cauterizing sealed cut vessels together so that I didn’t bleed all over. Sounded good to me. This was perhaps the weirdest thing that happened to me from my 5-night hospital stay.

After that came a period of more tugging and snipping, and a lot of tugging and pulling to free my port. I felt it and it hurt. I alerted them that I could feel it but was told it was normal. This felt like a lot longer than ten minutes. So, I began muttering to myself that I was fine and focused again on my breath. I was asked what I was saying. My voice boomed from under the drape coverings.

“I’M FINE. EVERYTHING’S FINE.”

This caused laughter.

I didn’t mean to be funny.

Finally, the port was free and out of my body. The next part of the plan was to just pull on the attached catheter that ran into one of my veins and have it slide out, freeing myself of it forever. Well, it was either stuck or thought likely scarred into my vein. I would need a step up of from this minor surgery to different minor surgery that was a little more involved and an OR would be needed. So, the port went BACK into my chest where it was covered with a gauze dressing and a large piece of Tegaderm. I was left with an open wound until an operating room could be booked.

Ummmm . . .  okay? Please insert your own reaction. I just can’t.

A time was reserved for noon that day. I’d be heavily sedated like a person is for a colonoscopy. My surgeon wanted me able to communicate in case the catheter had grown into a vein. I’d be put all the way under if needed. I am extremely interested in my health and wanted to be an observer in what was happening much like the foiled bedside removal attempt. I remember being wheeled into the OR. My glasses were off and everything was really blurry, but I remember looking up at the OR lights and trying to figure out why it looked like there were smaller blue looking lights inside the big ones. They reminded me of blue flowers. I heard voices. Nothing interesting was happening yet. Then someone shook my arm and I was awake back in the prepping/recovery room. Apparently, I moved around too much and needed anesthesia and missed the whole thing. It went well. My port was removed. The catheter part was only stuck and not scarred into a vein.

Renewed scars and a few stitches where my port used to be.

The next day a nurse practitioner from Infectious Disease visited. She let me know my blood infection was staphylococcus epidermis. This is a bacterial infection that is usually on top of the skin and shouldn’t be in the body. It’s not that uncommon. Echocardiograms would indicate if there was vegetation, or bacteria growing on the heart valves. The presence or absence of vegetation would determine how long I’d need antibiotics. It would either be a week or six-week course.

As an aside, she wore a stylish bandana wrapped around her head and was without eyebrows. She had cancer. I was amazed that she was working with patients in a hospital setting and expertly performing her job. We both even have the same oncologist. Meghann is in charge of making recommendations after my echocardiograms about how long I need to stay on antibiotics, when a new port can be placed, and ultimately when I can resume chemo. All my doctors and nurses here have been great and have had excellent communication with one another and with me. We locked eyes as I told her I knew she understood how important receiving chemo was and that I needed her to help be a voice for me in getting that as soon as it’s safely possible. I will take all the help I can get in getting support for my best care.

The transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) is your regular no stress ultrasound echocardiogram where you simply lie there and the technician takes images of your heart with gel on a wand tool called a transducer. The image quality was poor and they couldn’t see much. I needed a transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE). A TEE required conscious sedation and a camera tube placed down a person’s throat to get clearer images of the heart. It sees structures that are hard to see with the TTE. Once again, I expected to at least be aware of dosing off, but all of the sudden I was out. I was awake again before I knew it. Good news with the TEE is that there was no vegetation (or bacterial growth) on my heart valves. This was the first piece of news that had gone my way during my stay. I needed one final dose of an antibiotic (dalbavancin) as an outpatient once home. That was a welcomed second piece of good news.

There are degrees of complexities and levels of annoying when living with cancer. Nothing with cancer is ever as simple as it appears. If my immune system was not compromised, would any of these things have happened? I may have been able to dodge the blood infection. Maybe not. My port probably would have still leaked. My new on will be placed this week before my chemo treatment. I hope for simpler days ahead where I sleep in my own bed and not one in the hospital.