When Your Oncologist Leaves

Two weeks ago my oncologist told me some devastating news – he was leaving. It’s honestly one of the hardest things I’ve heard at an office visit over the years, and trust me, there have been some tough conversations.

He is leaving the UW health system.

He is moving to Florida.

He said he had to go.

What does that even mean?

I know I have been unhappy with some of the management decisions that have trickled down and affected my care. There have been changes I don’t think serve patients’ best interests. There have been facility needs that have gone unmet or approached with band-aids rather than true solutions. There very well could be demands put upon him that I know nothing about and he feels he can’t work in an environment that doesn’t match his philosophy anymore. I don’t know anything for sure other than he is leaving.

He is a GOOD DOCTOR. The best.

I understand he has to do what he needs to do. I can’t be mad at him for doing what is best for him. However, if he’s leaving because of some bureaucratic crap coming down from people who have lost their connection to treating, caring, and curing people with cancer, then I am outraged. My gut tells me to be outraged.

Whatever the reason, I am losing my oncologist.

I feel such sadness and an immense sense of loss. I have that feeling of a small child who suddenly discovers she has lost sight of her parent in a grocery store and stands frozen and scared as she begins to cry. I feel broken like a mirror that has shattered into many shards of sharp glass. The image looking back at me is now jagged and distorted. I feel like a kicker who missed placing the final kick through the uprights by inches in a championship game. Everything feels wrong. I am all out of sorts.

My oncologist has been a constant in my life for more than seven years. I’ve seen him every three weeks for the last three years. I’ve known him for about fifteen years because he was also my mother’s oncologist. I have held him to a very high standard. I’ve depended on him to be there for me. This is someone whom I’ve trusted, respected, and knew was one hundred percent on my side. He is a good blend of medical expertise and hope that every oncology patient needs. He understands I have many questions, I worry, and I’ve always wanted (and will continue to want) aggressively appropriate treatment options. I will choose option A with challenging side effects over option B with lesser effects if A can potentially do better work than B. Every. Single. Time.

He’s gone to bat for me on more than one occasion.

He knew how badly I wanted to keep teaching and helped me keep doing what I loved doing for years. He also told me when he thought it was becoming too tough and unrealistic.

He suggested supplements that have helped me feel healthy and strong.

He encouraged more testing that opened doors to current protocols. Protocols that have been good for me.

My oncologist understood me. He viewed me as a person and not just as a patient. I have grown very attached to him. I will miss him.

Where do I go from here?

I am fortunate for a few reasons. The UW Carbone Cancer Center where I receive care is one of the top cancer centers in the country and the only comprehensive cancer center in Wisconsin. I know I will continue to receive quality care. I am also lucky that if my oncologist is leaving, he is leaving at a time when I am doing really well. I can only imagine how much harder this would be for me to handle if I were struggling physically. Lastly, my oncologist has taught me well. I’ve learned a lot from him about my health. He has really shaped my thinking since we embarked on our doctor-patient relationship. I daresay I may have rubbed off on him, too. At least I hope I have.

I am not always an easy-going patient. I’ve edited consent forms before signing them. Someone there once compared metastatic breast cancer to a cow that had been let out of a barn. It’s Wisconsin. I added on to that analogy and told him, “Just because the cow’s been let out of the barn, it doesn’t mean it can crap all over the pasture.” I’ve questioned, I’ve pushed back, I’ve disagreed, and I’ve complained. Mind you, I’ve also agreed, supported, amazed, and sparkled because that’s the kind of gem I am. And I am a gem. I like to think my spirit has never been diminished there because of my health status.

Oncologists come and go. I understand this is true, perhaps I have been fortunate that it took this long to happen to me. People move on in the professional world all the time. Yet an oncologist is very different. In my eyes, an accountant, dentist, plumber, chef, lawyer, teacher, or other professionals all have very different relationships with the people they serve. The relationship with a doctor is different, more intense, and more personal. I feel lost, abandoned, and alone. This person just isn’t going to be around and that makes it similar to a death in some aspects. A good friend of mine has had two oncologists leave her, and a third tell her she couldn’t see her again because she has passed enough benchmarks in time and is there is no evidence of disease.

The process has started to find a new oncologist so I have one in place when he leaves in a couple months. If you know me, you won’t be surprised that I’ve compiled a list of requirements my next oncologist must have.

My oncologist needs to be:

  • Accessible
  • Hopeful
  • Positive
  • Empathetic
  • Personable yet professional
  • Up to date on current research and new treatments
  • A lot like my current oncologist 🙂

My oncologist must:

  • Have a breast cancer specialty
  • Keep a very close eye on me
  • Advocate for me
  • Remember I am a person and not just a patient
  • Accept and even enjoy my personality (I’m anxious, I’m smart, I research a lot on my own, I advocate for myself, I can be intense and insistent, I’m thorough, I’m hopeful, I’m fun, I cry, I’m sensitive, and I’m tough).

Sure, I have high standards and I am not going to settle for someone who doesn’t meet them. A good fit is essential for my best care.

I am confident I will find the right fit.

Unfortunately, I feel the time has come for me to move away from the smaller clinic setting I love so dearly and transfer to the center at the giant hospital. I need to put more weight behind a preferred oncologist than my preferred location. Truthfully, I’ve heard whispers that the smaller clinic may not stay open. I wouldn’t be surprised if it closed. It would be consistent with the kind of nonsense decisions that have been made regarding that smaller setting. Then, once again, I’d have to make a move with either a new doctor, a new location, or both. More importantly, I don’t know if I can continue to go to my current clinic once my oncologist leaves. Maybe I need a fresh start. It could be the best choice I can make.

It would be tough for me to leave and make this change. I’ve also grown very attached to my nurses, NP, and even the schedulers and people at reception. Everyone is so friendly and it’s one of the reasons I prefer the smaller setting. I get attached far too easily. Still, I must put myself first and make the decision that serves me the best.

I will be fine. I have time to accept this change, make a plan, and transition positively whatever I decide. As for my oncologist, I will thank him, say goodbye, and be forever grateful that I have been in his care for so many years. He’ll always be my oncologist. I’ll just have two now.

Consider responding:

  • What helps you when you need to make a difficult transition?
  • What qualities or characteristics do you look for in your doctor?

The Choices We Make

“It is our choices that show us what we truly are, far more than our abilities.”  ~ J.K. Rowling

It’s been years since I’ve read a Harry Potter novel. Oh, how I loved them! J.K. Rowling created a fantasy world so real. The lasting relationships she developed through her characters based on trust and truth still set examples today for relationships I seek. The themes she wrote about through fiction resonate as powerful truths.

J.K. Rowling has fallen off the Forbes Billionaire list due to charitable giving. It’s a clear choice that reflects her beliefs and core values.

I’ve thought a lot about the choices I’ve made and how those choices have shown me what/who I truly am. I make many choices. Some surely have been mistakes. My culinary fiasco of brownies with spinach puree did not work. What was I thinking? Fortunately, I’ve made health related choices that have gone better for me.

I choose to exercise daily.

I choose to be positive.

I choose to surround myself with people who focus on joy.

I choose to focus on self-care.

I choose to see myself as healthy.

I choose to live with a Stage V mindset focused on unrelenting wellness.

Read more about Stage V in an earlier post if you missed it or need a refresher.

These choices have shown me that I am responsible for my reactions and decisions. We all always have a choice in terms of how we react whether those choices are based on health, comments or the behaviors of others, or whatever unexpected twists and turns life takes. We all have our stuff. We get to choose how we walk with that stuff. We each need to be intentional with the choices we make.

My choices have taught me how to live more fully and to focus on what I feel is important. The person I truly am is a person who is still a learner, discovering new truths about myself, and doing my best each day to be healthy and live with joy. I also have perfected making dark chocolate brownies straight from Betty Crocker. If brownies somehow define what I am, I cannot argue.

So be it.

Please comment: What choices have you made that really make a difference in your life?