Baby Robin Rescue

“There was a baby bird in your tree we took down,” explained the tree man, pointing to the ground at the side of my house. “It’s there in its nest.”

Tucked under the downspout and against the bricks was a nest that held a rather large, fluffy, baby bird.  Its home had vanished into the tree chipper, its mother wouldn’t know where to find it, and night was falling. Thunder grumbled softly and the sky flashed Morse code that a storm was near. Humidity hung in the air, thick and uncomfortably sticky.

“What should I do with it?” I felt I should know but I didn’t.

It was clear the baby was a robin. It’s grayish-brown feathers filled the nest entirely, but it still looked too young to fly. Its little beak opened and closed expecting food.

“You can just leave it there for the night,” said the man. I sensed the attitude was to leave it in nature as close to its original home as possible.

I knew instantly I was not leaving this motherless, little baby robin alone on the ground where it was completely helpless and unprotected. It wouldn’t survive the night. Should I take it inside with me? Was there someplace else I could leave it outside? Even though I hadn’t held the chainsaw, I still had destroyed its home. Mama robin wouldn’t find it.

Ilene is my neighbor who also very conveniently is a vet. She was outside trying to get her lawn mowed before it stormed. Lightning flickered more regularly in the sky. I couldn’t wait much longer. It was getting dark and the baby bird still had nowhere to spend the night.

“Ilene! Do you have a second?” I shouted above the motor and motioned in my direction. She stopped the mower. “I have a baby bird here.”

We talked over the options. No, she could not take it. They didn’t work with rescue animals at her clinic. There was a vet clinic off the beltline on Rimrock Road that was open twenty-four hours and took wild animals. That was a possibility. Finally, we decided it was best to put the bird and its nest cradled on top of an abandoned nest in a bush to the side of my house.  It had a better chance there than on the ground. With flashlight in hand, we safely nestled it in.

My next job was to dig up a couple of worms for it and try to feed it. Sweat rolled down my face and back. I couldn’t see where I was digging.  Multiple holes were appearing in my garden and there was not a worm to be seen. Why was it so hard to find a dang worm? This was crazy. I was crazy.

After about ten minutes I abandoned the worm quest. Plan D was now in motion. I would take the bird to the vet clinic.

Flashlight in hand, I retrieved the baby robin, put it in a box, and placed it on the floor on the passenger side of the car. Tired and sweaty, off I went, hoping the thunderstorm wouldn’t hit until I returned home. My mother’s voice spoke quietly in my head, “Don’t go. Stay in for the night. You’ll get wet.” But my mother wasn’t around anymore. It was just shy of a month since she died, but she was still there chattering away at me.

I didn’t mind.

Keep in mind, I also didn’t listen.

I knew my actions were some type of response to feeling alone and a deep need to fix the unfixable.

Baby bird made some sounds. “Tweet, tweet.” What was it saying? I didn’t speak bird but decided to tweet back anyway. “Tweet, tweet, tweet,” I said.

The sky let loose torrents of water which made it tough to see the road. It was one of those downpours where you feel like you’re continuously under a waterfall and the windshield wipers can’t keep up. All this felt so insane on several levels. Tweeting back to the little bird was somehow comforting.  We tweeted back and forth for the rest of the trip until I found the clinic.

I covered my little bird with my coat and ran the box into the clinic. I suspiciously eyed an orange cat that was sitting on a bench just inside the door licking its paw. A woman at the front desk smiled and took the bird to the back room. That was it, I was done. I headed back out into the stormy night.

When I got back and buckled up in my car, I realized I hadn’t said good-bye to my bird.

Yep, I heard it.

My bird.

Somehow that little animal had become mine in a time span of less than an hour. Maybe it was mine the moment I saw it on the ground . . . I don’t know.  But I did know I had to dash back through the rain into the clinic so I could say good-bye.

I’ve been this way for a long time. I’ve learned to be okay with it.

“I’m back,” I announced as I dripped in front of the receptionist.

Foolishly I added, “I didn’t get to say good-bye to my bird.”

She stared at me for a long moment before disappearing into the back room and returning with the robin.

“Bye, bye,” I said. “Be a good little bird.”

I felt I needed to add a few tweets in there to make sure it understood.  I already felt foolish, so there was no point stopping. “Tweet, tweet . . . tweet, tweet.”

I think it understood.

Somehow, I think my mother did, too.

Committing to the Hat

One thing that drives me crazy lately is wearing a hat. It is winter and hat wearing weather. On the pro side, it keeps me toasty warm. I am a fan of toasty warm. On the con side, taking off the hat usually shifts my wig. It has to be done carefully. One hand has to glide up past my forehead and underneath said hat. It rests between the hat and my hair, anchoring it in place. It doesn’t always work. It has become one of many extra processes in my life. It makes me feel self-conscious. I am not a fan of self-conscious.

When I put on a hat, I have to really commit to the hat. You see, I may have it on for a while. Even if I get hot, I don’t feel like I can easily take it off without possibly drawing attention to myself. The reality is probably no one is looking at me. But there’s still the self-conscious thing.

Committing to the hat is just one more thing I have to do. It’s one of the behind the scene consequences of living with cancer. Others include my independent pharmacy of mostly supplements that I ingest several times a day that I believe help me, neupogen injections every weekend to boost white cell counts, feeling anxious about many social situations, not knowing how I’ll feel when I wake up, and juggling an ever-changing schedule of appointments and such.

Committing in general has been up in the air over the past several years. Everything is more uncertain. Maybe that’s why the hat is harder to wear.

Ironically, I need to commit to uncertainty.

A hat seems like such a small thing. But it’s a small thing over which I would rather exercise some control. Control is a big thing for a lot of people. Some try to control other people through a position where they do not know how to be a successful leader. We can’t control how others respond. Ineffective leaders are met with lack of respect and people who undermine them in order to do what is needed. People who seek to manipulate in relationships are still alone inside. Others try to control themselves through self-destructive acts. Yes, we are responsible for our choices. A decision to inflict hurt on yourself is not within your control or a choice. It is the polar opposite of self-love. I have come across a few people in my life who have struggled with self-love. I can’t control them. I can show up for them with love, friendship, and support.

The hat is also about control– my need for control over something where I don’t have it. I’ve really not had much control since diagnosis.

Anyone have a hat for that?

Uncertainty and lack of control go together like chocolate and peanut butter.

Chocolate and peanut butter are better.

I’d love to pal around in a vintage hat of the 1920s, go back in time, and meet my grandma when she was younger. It would have to be a special time traveling hat. We’d be friends. I imagine meeting at what was known back in the day as Stevens Point Normal School where she went for teaching certification. I’d love to see her passion of one of our shared interests and how her youth and experiences shaped the years when I knew her.

I don’t care for the cancer hats, the kinds that are knitted or ordered through cancer magazines and online. This includes bandanas and scarves. They all are just so obvious. When I wore those years ago, I was fine with them, both physically and emotionally comfortable. It was too bad if others had a problem seeing me that way. Now, they are more of a reminder of loss. I am very aware of my losses and don’t need visual reminders. I am not some sort of public service announcement either. The cancer hat I wear is invisible, but it is part of that uncertainty and lack of control.

In fact, I still don’t know how to refer to myself. You think I would after nearly seven years. Am I a survivor? A thriver? The survivor label is used for someone who has been treated for cancer and thought to be cancer free. The thriver label is used to distinguish those who will never be thought of as survivors . . . yet. I’m not sure where this began. Perhaps it was well-intentioned. Perhaps it was designed out of need to give some of that sought after control back to people’s lives. However, there is even some discomfort within the cancer community itself with the term. As a result of that discomfort, sometimes thrivers are not included in discussions or are isolated into their own group because there is worry they will scare others, not have any similar needs in common with survivors, and be of no help. Abigail Johnston explains it better in her blog post Early Stagers vs. Metastatic Patients. Take a moment to read it!

Right now, I think I can wear both those hats. I’m surviving and thriving. Maybe I’m a driver (for change), a striver (for health), a troublemaking conniver (just because). I’m definitely feeling a Lin-Manuel vibe. At the same time, I really don’t like being labeled. Just let me be me.

And there it is . . . the reason I don’t know how to refer to myself.

Just let me be me.

Don’t call me anything. What bothers me is others who want to tell me what I am. Some are very firm about it. We’re all different. The survivor hat may not work for one person, but work really well for someone else.

If I could choose a hat, I would choose a sun hat. I can pull off a wide-brimmed sun hat and wear it well. I like that because with proper sunshades I can people watch (stare at people) and no one knows that’s what I’m doing (until now). Keeping cool in the hot sun is a priority, too. My fair complexion freckles and I burn easily. I must do what I can to remain youthful looking. Medications also require avoiding time in direct sun.

My favorite hat is a cream wool winter hat I used to wear with the brim flipped up. I guess it’s called a bucket hat (think Paddington Bear). I wore it during a golden time when all was well in my life. It looked cute on me. I had no problems committing to that hat. It was functional, attractive, and easy to wear. Stylistically, it was very simple and matched with many of my coats. My life was also much simpler when I wore it, but I’m sure I didn’t realize it because I didn’t know what I know now.

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Are there any positives to committing to the hat?

People who have let go of control seem to be happier. You can love and accept things as they are without a need to fix something. Surrendering control may present opportunities to relax. You may find you get what you need. Controlling less and doing less may give you more. Committing to the hat, committing to uncertainty, can help a person commit to more freedom. Spontaneity can take pressure off from a lot of choices. Do you want to know something? When I started this paragraph, I really didn’t think I was going to find a way to reframe this hat thing in a positive way. Anything is possible.

Committing to freedom, to relaxing, to ultimately receiving more of what I need all sound a lot better than wearing uncertainty day after day after day.

I know for everyone else wearing a hat doesn’t cause a second thought. It shouldn’t. Well, maybe it should cause pause for some folks because there are people who adorn some very questionable hat choices in my book. Remember though, it isn’t really about the hat. One last thing the hat is about is recognizing that there are things people do that aren’t visible on the surface. Everyone has these. Everyone has uncertainty. Everyone just wants to have the comfort of a hat that fits really well. My favorite cream hat calls.