B Positive

B Positive is a CBS sit-com about a therapist who needs a kidney donor and is looking for a match. He can’t find one within his family to match his B-positive blood type. A woman he once knew offers him one of hers and is a match. The series gives a glimpse into the life of someone waiting for a transplant while still portraying someone living a normal and crazy life. The show brings visibility to hard things through humor.

Could a similar comedy work with metastatic breast cancer as the sometimes background/sometimes foreground subject matter? I’ve learned things about transplants that I didn’t know before I started watching B Positive. It’s been an educational tool like I imagine a breast cancer “comedy” being. Comedy isn’t the right word because there’s nothing funny about any cancer. I don’t know what the right words would be.

A serious comedy?

I know I’ve had my moments where I’ve come home from an oncology appointment with some doubt that it was me in the exam room. Once I asked an oncologist to look harder at one of my nipples. Honestly, who does that? A closer look was taken. All was fine. Another time I had an enlightening conversation about discomfort “down there,” my vagina, and vaginal dryness. I assured him I didn’t want him to check it out. He thought for a moment and shot back about how estrogen deprived I was. Suddenly, it all made perfect sense. We moved back to discussing the upper half of my body. I daresay these visits are comedy gold packed with meaningful content.

Uncomfortable humor is always hilarious to people not experiencing it.

What other meaningful content could be balanced with comedy? Here are a few ideas:

• Diagnosis

• Hope

• Fear

•  Pinkwashing

• October (We Are Aware) Awareness Month

• Identity

• Comments

• Clinical Trials

• Research

• Chemotherapy

• Hair

• Side Effects

• Battling, Fighting, Losing the Battle/Fight

• Scanxiety

• Life

• Success

• Family and Friend Issues

• Loss

• Day-to-Day Life

• Working and Treatment

• Relationships

• Positivity

• Early and Late Stage Perspectives

• Kale

Death of course would need to be addressed. I don’t think death is funny so I’m not including it in the list to balance with comedy.

I don’t know how any of this would work.

I don’t know if it could work.

Viewers could get a glimpse into MBC. Would it be hard? Yes. Would it be done correctly? I have no idea. It bothers me enough now when commercials for medication intended for thrivers are shown and no one is wearing a bandana or having any difficulty at all. Other characters on TV or in books don’t meet my expectations either. They either die such a painful death that another character is affected more, or they are portrayed as achieving goals that are pretty unreasonable.

What would this amazing show be called? Comments about breasts that are off the cuff or meant to be cute, funny, or sexy are instead incredibly offensive. Breasts and boobs should be removed from the title. Nor should the title be scary. It is a comedy even if it contains serious subject matter. One of my friends calls herself Meta Martha. A title like this would be short, sweet, and to the point. I’m already using it as a working title. Or perhaps just Mets. It could be mistaken as a sports show and pull in more male viewers.

B Positive is a title that carries two meanings. There is the reference to the main character Drew’s blood type of B+ that he needs to match for a successful kidney transplant. The other meaning is to be positive with whatever life throws at you. I’m on board with positivity (usually). Positivity is a feel good energy. Positive people attract like-minded individuals with similar energy. I feel better when I am positive. I am often described as positive. All good.

And yet, it takes more than “being positive” to “beat” metastatic breast cancer. Someone I hadn’t seen in years told me of someone she knew who had Stage IV cancer and now didn’t have it anymore. She was treated at Carbone as I am and had chosen western medicine to treat the cancer. Skeptical, I asked for her to share a bit more about this woman’s story. Positivity was the instant answer. Positivity cured her. It certainly could have helped, however, it isn’t measurable. It is better than negativity. I figured there was more to this story but didn’t ask. I changed the subject. Later, this friend also shared her daughter (whom I taught) cried when she heard I got sick years ago. She asked about my support network and offered help with meals, driving, or whatever. Both were unexpected comments that touched me. Empathy and kindness may need to replace the be positive slogan.

Hospitals promote programs and research while treating cancer. Reputable foundations and charities don’t get the exposure they deserve. News stories are often missing important information. Celebrity deaths bring temporary attention. Celebrity survivors don’t help much. They beat it after all. All of these combined haven’t brought information and a sense of urgency to people who aren’t affected personally. If you haven’t been personally affected, the cause isn’t as urgent.

TV shows have nationwide exposure and massive audiences.

Metastatic breast cancer needs that kind of exposure.

Maybe I need to write a pilot.

Martha, what do you think?