My Most Protective Option

Choosing my most protective option has lately become a repeated refrain for me. I find myself comparing choices as I deal with a smaller world for myself and what I am able to do with limited options available to me.

In a school setting, teachers always followed the principle of providing the least restrictive environment for students with special needs. I came back to that idea time after time in work with special education teachers and instruction for students. I want the same type of tried and true standard for the circumstances I now find myself in as I shelter at home. The least restrictive environment would do nothing for me. Heck, the least restrictive environment would place me out and about without a mask in large crowds with strangers. What I needed was the exact opposite of the least restrictive environment. The most protective option fit perfectly. It fits every decision I’ve needed to make so far.

Medical

Being in the same room with my oncologist is preferred. I have been open to visits over the phone and video style because it mainly seems I have little choice. I could hopefully see her if I needed some type of physical interaction. If I’m choosing the most protective option, I must go with a remote visit. I may feel differently after a few months. Telephone and video have limitations. Eventually, the most protective option may be to see her in person as it may yield results that you can’t get without contact. Meeting face to face could eventually be more protective as circumstances vary.

My treatments have continued as scheduled. An army of gatekeepers and temperature takers await me at the uncrowded hospital entrance. Hallways are unnaturally empty. No one waits in waiting rooms and people are sent to their treatment bays immediately. I wait there alone. The nursing staff is cheerful even though they wear masks and protective face shields. I was not happy with the answers I received about how many days (yes, days) they were asked to wear the same surgical mask before getting a new one. That is most definitely not the most protective option for them even with a face shield. Protecting myself involves that those I have contact with are also protected. I do not want to be overly critical. I do want everyone to stay safe. I’ll follow up with a few more questions at my next visit.

Groceries

Getting groceries has evolved into quite a process. March 13th is the date I started social distancing and staying at home. Wisconsin’s Safer at Home order took effect on March 25th.  I could still shop during the first hour of business assigned as a courtesy time for the elderly and those with underlying conditions if that was my only option. It would still put me in a public setting. My other options are delivery or curbside pickup. I haven’t been able to nab a delivery time. Instead, I focus on getting a curbside pickup timeslot every two weeks. Slots open up online one week in advance at midnight. They are gone within minutes. I am sleeping and hopefully lost to my dreams at midnight, except when I need to reserve a grocery time. One night after I reserved a spot, I noticed all the available times were gone within ten minutes. It has gotten even more competitive since then. Last week they vanished within three minutes. Three! I am not sure exactly how many are offered each day, but the demand is much higher than the supply. I am thankful I got one and that for now I have figured out what I need to do in order to get what I need. Things change quickly. I just learned the window opens up at 1 PM rather than midnight. Time will tell if that switch makes ordering even more competitive.

I admit it also makes me sad that grocery shopping strikes me as a cut-throat world. My oncologist advised me to take this route as a way to keep myself and others I may come in contact with (like her) healthy. This is something I can do for me and for her. I feel some guilt in taking a spot that is in such high demand. I can stretch items and plan menus so I am more than comfortable shopping every two weeks rather than shop every week. At the same time, I need this service as much as someone else, so I must do what keeps me safest. It’s my most protective option. I will choose it every time.

Reserving a time involves multiple steps. Getting the groceries into my home adds several more. Items come out of boxes (cereal, protein bars, yogurt) so I don’t need to bring boxes into my home. Plastic items get wiped down with Clorox. Blueberries, blackberries, and other small fruit are taken out of their plastic containers and put into glass containers. I dunk foods in soapy water and rinse them. There is a sanitized and not sanitized half of my counter as I unload items. My groceries have never been cleaner. It’s exhausting and insane. Right now, it’s what I do thanks to a viral YouTube video.

Hair

When my hair grew back in 2013, I was done with coloring it. It could be natural. I was firm about it. I had to staunchly defend my choice to one or two who couldn’t understand it even though it had nothing to do with them. There’s always a critic. My hair was beautiful. A silver curl framed my face in a striking spiral. When it grew back in 2019, it was a lot grayer than before. I felt so old and felt I looked washed out. My wig was a much younger look and I liked what it did for me. I chose to get on board with coloring again and that was that. I certainly never thought a situation would unfold that would prevent me from getting my hair done. I have hair. I have quite a lot of hair. It is ironic that I can’t get it done or go anywhere. Who knows where I’ll be on the cancer road when stay at home lifestyles finally are no longer necessary.

I took matters into my own hands and colored my hair on my own. I ordered some that was free of parabens, sulfates, phthalates, and ammonia. It didn’t sound like it was too hard. The directions were straight forward enough. The company had videos to watch. What could go wrong? The only places I go are to my oncology appointments and to pick up my grocery order. No one sees me so now was as good of a time as ever to try something new. Chalk it up to a massive need to feel in control, but there is a bit more to it. I wanted to feel good about my appearance. Perhaps that sounds vain. Having hair that looks decent goes a long way for this metastatic breast cancer patient who wore a wig for three years. I want to keep my hair and I want it to look good, even if no one sees me. I see me.

Inconveniences vs. Problems

Rabbi Steve Leder appeared on TODAY with Hoda & Jenna earlier in April. He offered excellent advice on perspective and encouraged people to distinguish between inconveniences and problems. Not being able to go to a restaurant is an inconvenience. Having bad hair truly is an inconvenience. It sucks but it doesn’t make it less true. Not being able to breathe and needing a ventilator is a problem. Not having any food or a means of getting food is a problem. I need to remind myself that what I am experiencing personally through this so far have been inconveniences. I may shed a few tears as a way to deal with my feelings, but my issues remain identified as inconveniences, not problems. You can listen to the brief interview here.

Choosing my most protective options will continue to guide me in the days ahead. It offers a solid way for me to evaluate choices and make consistent decisions. It removes my feelings and provides me an objective format. Hopefully, it will make tougher decisions much easier because the safe choice is usually an obvious choice.

It won’t help me figure out if I should bake chocolate chip cookies or brownies. This isn’t an inconvenience or problem. Neither option is more protective than the other. Perhaps my litmus test doesn’t hold up in this situation.

Luckily, I know what I must do.

The Choices We Make

“It is our choices that show us what we truly are, far more than our abilities.”  ~ J.K. Rowling

It’s been years since I’ve read a Harry Potter novel. Oh, how I loved them! J.K. Rowling created a fantasy world so real. The lasting relationships she developed through her characters based on trust and truth still set examples today for relationships I seek. The themes she wrote about through fiction resonate as powerful truths.

J.K. Rowling has fallen off the Forbes Billionaire list due to charitable giving. It’s a clear choice that reflects her beliefs and core values.

I’ve thought a lot about the choices I’ve made and how those choices have shown me what/who I truly am. I make many choices. Some surely have been mistakes. My culinary fiasco of brownies with spinach puree did not work. What was I thinking? Fortunately, I’ve made health related choices that have gone better for me.

I choose to exercise daily.

I choose to be positive.

I choose to surround myself with people who focus on joy.

I choose to focus on self-care.

I choose to see myself as healthy.

I choose to live with a Stage V mindset focused on unrelenting wellness.

Read more about Stage V in an earlier post if you missed it or need a refresher.

These choices have shown me that I am responsible for my reactions and decisions. We all always have a choice in terms of how we react whether those choices are based on health, comments or the behaviors of others, or whatever unexpected twists and turns life takes. We all have our stuff. We get to choose how we walk with that stuff. We each need to be intentional with the choices we make.

My choices have taught me how to live more fully and to focus on what I feel is important. The person I truly am is a person who is still a learner, discovering new truths about myself, and doing my best each day to be healthy and live with joy. I also have perfected making dark chocolate brownies straight from Betty Crocker. If brownies somehow define what I am, I cannot argue.

So be it.

Please comment: What choices have you made that really make a difference in your life?