Morphing

I’m a little wren

Nesting in the pine

And singing to be heard

Loudly and sure

Because I have a song to share.

I’m a white rose

Opening in the garden

With petals etched in pink

At the edges

Because my time is now.

I’m a cloud

Floating across the sky

And ever changing

Shape and form

Because that’s what clouds do.

I’m a book

Scrawling with thousands of words

Filled with originality

One you can’t put down

Because it is unexpected.

I’m invisible

Yearning to be seen

Screaming to be heard

Ignored by so many

Because I am incurable.

I’m a candle

Lighting the dark

And giving hope

Wherever it’s needed

Because candles illuminate life.

I’m a butterfly

Fluttering in the breeze

Lighting on flower

After flower

Because I make the world beautiful.

I’m a song

Humming my melody

With a driving rhythm

And I listen to the spaces between the notes

Because they are important to the song.

I’m the sky

Seeing everything below

No matter how I look

Sun or rain, day or night

Because I am always there.

I’m a bee

Working to keep the

Entire world from collapse

With little thanks or understanding

Because I sometimes sting.

I’m a unicorn

Staying as safe as I can

And as real as can be

While I travel with others like me

Because unicorns do exist.

I am a human

With cancer

Wishing to morph

Into someone without cancer

Because I want to be healthy again.

These are the things I am

As I morph from one to another

But I also feel like a puddle of tears

Or a bundle of nerves

Firing uncontrollably

As demon cancer cells

Multiply inside a body trying to stay alive. 

How am I feeling?

I feel misunderstood

And sometimes voiceless

Silenced by a need to conceal

And wear a disguise of a smile.

Look into my eyes.

My eyes don’t lie.

Eyes are windows

Into our souls.

My soul either is a light

Or it is an empty hole of longing.

I want us all to be lights.

What do you see?

Off Roading

When I went off roading in Sedona, I went for a rugged adventure. I wanted to experience something new I hadn’t done before. It was an opportunity to see things that I would be unable to see on my own. I had no idea that there would be a cancer connection.

Off roading and cancer were two things that were simply too far apart to be connected.

I didn’t think about cancer at all on my Pink Jeep Tour. Bouncing around as the jeep hit every bump and rock possible while taking in all the scenery was all I could manage. Distractions from metastatic breast cancer are rare for me. The connections between the two hit me after I returned home.

Off roading is quite a metaphor for cancer.

Both take you off the main road you found yourself on that was a smooth and comfortable ride.  Suddenly, the smooth paved road has disappeared. The navigation system doesn’t work. No signs mark the way to tell you where you are. It is unknown territory. To maneuver on this terrain takes skill. The big difference is off roading is fun and cancer is not.

Some refer to cancer as a bump in the road. This may be a fitting description for early stage cancer where treatment is successful and cancer doesn’t return. Metastatic cancer is an unpaved road made of mainly rocks that cause THOUSANDS of bumps. They appear as soon as the road changes from asphalt to dirt and rocks. One jolt is met with another, and then another, followed by countless more. They come rapidly like bullets out of a gun.

There was even a highlight of the tour that was called the staircase of no return where the jeep lurched and jerked down a slope made of rocks that resembled a staircase. Those of us with metastatic disease travel these bumps. We passed the point of no return when we were diagnosed.

The guide described the tour being like a roller coaster. A roller coaster fits my life, too. Up, down, upside down, lightning speed, and filled with twists and turns. Metastatic cancer is like a runaway rollercoaster in the mountains filled with precarious dangers like cliffs, avalanches, and a vicious wild animal or two. You can’t get off it. The topsy-turvy ride is over if you do.

He went on to share with the group how he was trained. It appeared like he was driving with no plan over the course of our 3-hour tour. However, part of his training was to make sure the tires hit exact markers to keep everyone safe. I’ve connected this to precision medicine and targeted treatments. His comments have also made me think about how my decisions matter. Like those tire tracks, I have to make sure I hit things at exactly the right angles at the right moment. And I have no control. I can’t control what my oncologist will say, or test results, or research. I’m trying to drive my own off-road vehicle without training. I’m self-taught and feel I have a certain level of expertise, but man, I wish I knew how to be a better driver on this bumpy road.

The tour was remarkable in the unparalleled beauty it revealed and what it taught me about life that has nothing to do with cancer. Maybe it does.

I was reminded what it felt like to feel free.

To celebrate life.

To continue to find meaning.

I rediscovered how important it is to know my worth. I am worth a lot. Confidence was gained every day I hiked. I began my vacation being unsure about my steps and gradually I found myself more decisive on where I placed my foot. I made very tiny leaps from one rock to another. Reminders to live in the moment and live fully are welcome.

I want to share one final thought on the agave plant. It has nothing to do with tequila. The agave has a life span of 20-25 years and it blooms only once in its life. It sprouts a tall stalk over 6 feet that resembles an asparagus stalk when it is near the end of its life. This can grow 3 to 8 inches a day when it gets ready to bloom. The blossoms are yellow and then they turn red. They bloom and the plant is said to be most beautiful at the end of its life. I find that deeply sad. The rest of our group seemed to find it oddly beautiful. I refuse to draw parallels to human life, to my life. It doesn’t make sense to me that something that has taken so long to shine only lasts a few days.

And yet I can’t help it. Since I look for meaning in things, I wonder what I am meant to know from the agave. A lot of goodness, joy, and success has come my way over the past couple of years. I’ve always been a late bloomer. Is this it?

No, I am not an agave plant. I’ve bloomed more than once.

Beauty blooms and thrives in inhospitable conditions. It can sprout up from cracks in rocks, tolerate insufferable heat, and grow without rain. I can relate. I stay alive even with cancer. I shall continue to bloom like a rare rose, a wildflower, or even a desert cactus.

The off roading adventure was beyond bumpy. It was also healing. I saw scenery I would have no other way of seeing. I discovered an uncrowded spot to watch the sunset that was easily accessible. It was healing by going and getting away from my life here. Sadly, the vortexes did not have the healing power I hoped. Maybe I’m a fool for hoping they would. Stranger things have happened. Inexplicable natural phenomenon rests solidly in that category. So many cancer things don’t make sense to me anyway.

I’ll take every bit of hope I can get on this bumpy road.

Why Winter Is Beautiful

Winter is beautiful with lots of snow to paint the surroundings in postcard scenes. Enthusiasts hit the outdoors with passion. Others enjoy the scenic views from inside. It’s how it should be in Wisconsin. Snowbirds fly south. Of course, many live in warmer climates all year by choice. Winter takes on a greener and warmer meaning in those places.

Memories of snow days as a child were rare miracles. A free day playing at home. The appreciation of a snow day was not lost on me as a teacher. They always came along at the right time. Virtual learning throughout the pandemic has made the snow day obsolete. As a retired educator, every day is extended summer for me or a snow day depending on the time of year.

I love Thich Nhat Hanh’s wisdom for many reasons. His thoughts on snow fit perfectly with a Wisconsin winter. I’ve come back to one of his quotes several times this winter.

If you choose not to find joy in the snow, you will have less joy in your life but still the same amount of snow.

Thich Nhat Hanh

I hope to provide some pictorial joy of the snow for you today.

A fresh snowfall looks so pristine. Diamond glints catch in the sunshine and the snow sparkles invitingly. You don’t want anything to disrupt these views. All is still and quiet everywhere you look. It always feels a little magical when I get to be one of the first to experience a landscape after a snowfall.

Cross country skiing and walking is my favorite way to enjoy winter scenery. Walking provides more flexibility and exploration. There is beauty around every bend. I also don’t worry about my balance or falling when walking. Walking means I can do hills! I have become a year round outdoor walker.

The historic Hyde’s Mill was a new discovery for me this winter. It’s a stone dam with a wooden water wheel dating back to 1850. It felt frozen in time and yet the gurgling sound of water rushing helped me appreciate the present moment. This was earlier in winter. I haven’t been back but I’m confident the water has frozen solid by now. I look forward to making trips in other seasons for comparisons and to travel back in time once more.

Contrasting views during and after a big snowfall have been fun to see this winter. Both have their own beauty. It was enjoyable to watch the snow coming down from the warmth of my home. The next morning was stunning where the sun slowly melted the snow off of tree branches.

Cardinal company is a treat all year. The red stands out on a white background.

There is so much to take in on winter walks, more than just snow. These views hold memories for me and tell stories. While passing the bench, I wondered when I last held snow in my bare hands. I couldn’t remember, so off came my gloves and I scooped up a handful. It was cold and packable, really good snow. It felt refreshing and took me back to childhood very briefly.

The last time I went sledding was a few decades ago. The pandemic has brought adults out in droves over winter to partake again in this childhood activity. Everyone seems a little more stir crazy than usual this year. Sledding is such a fun way to experience the thrill of the hill and flight on snow. There is laughter and screaming. It’s a momentary escape and opportunity to release and let go of unhelpful feelings. While sledding, I felt like a kid again who could do anything. I felt fully alive. I even made a snow angel that only partly turned out. New traditions can start at any age. We are only as old as we feel.

This was a truly beautiful day and now a treasured memory.

I hope if you have snow where you are, you have found a way to enjoy it.

What I Did Last Summer

Spring was lost.

Summer was lost.

Uneventful days passed.

Life inched by like a snail going nowhere.

COVID has consumed six months now.

Six months gone.

Mostly alone.

Gone forever.

And yet I look at the good.

I can’t help it.

Good is always around.

Also forever.

One place I found it was in flowers.

Repetitive days of solitude

And safeness

Drew me to nature.

My camera my paintbrush.

Flowers my canvas.

So many patterns and colors

From 6 inches away.

Wonder

Beauty

Life

Joy

Summer was not lost after all.

A world covered in flowers is not only beautiful but a reassuring constant.

These thoughts formed as I thought about what I did over summer. There were a couple momentous events that I celebrated because birthdays and related plans still happen in pandemics. Most days were quiet. There was a lot of sameness and not much to shout about. I viewed medical appointments as chances to socialize a bit. My trips to the grocery store twice a month held high excitement.

My photos visually reflect what I did last summer whether I puttered about my back yard, paused to take a photo while walking in the neighborhood, or found myself in a favorite nature setting.

Patterns and colors in flowers captivated me this summer.
Everything about this makes me feel happy. The bright vibrant color. The layered petals. The petals slowly unfurling and still emerging from the center. It is a world in itself.
Floating flower art feels very zen.
Blues and purples are a soothing combination.
These colors remind me of a sunset. I marveled at several of these and found all were slightly different, just like every sunset.
This succulent reminded me of glazed pottery. I’m pretty sure it follows a Fibonacci sequence.
Bee balm attracts so much life. Watching its visitors has brought many happy moments to my summer.
Every flower has a story. I am one flower sharing mine.