Tracks and Visions

Winter does not have to be a cold dormant time. Winter can be a time where you see your “tracks” more easily in the sense you can see where you have been. You can also have a vision for where you’re heading.

Cross-country skiing lets me see what is both physically behind and ahead of me. It has been more challenging to do the last couple of years more due to climate change than anything health oriented. There hasn’t been enough snow. If there was enough snow, then the Wisconsin temperatures were too frigid to endure outdoor recreational winter fun. My schedule factors into plans as well. A lot has to align for me to make skiing happen. Finally, one of those aligned days happened. Even though the snow wasn’t perfect, there was what I hoped would be just enough to make it possible. Who knew when another opportunity would come along? I gathered my gear and made the short drive to the arboretum and ventured out.

My intentions on this day were to enjoy being outside getting fresh air and see how I did on skis. I went slower than a turtle and never got the gliding motion going that I love feeling on skis. Had a turtle come along, it would have easily beaten me. I managed to stay upright the entire time and that thrilled me, especially since there were wobbly moments where I momentarily lost my balance and quickly caught myself. I noticed these times were when I looked up or turned my head to the side to see something. Well, I decided not to make those movements and just stay super focused on my careful and deliberate movements forward.

It was as I reversed the route and was heading back to my starting point that I realized I had a wonderful opportunity to work on balance in action. Very slowly, I began to work on turning my head from left to right while continuing to ski forward. Then I would intentionally move my head up to look at the treetops and back down so my eyes were straight ahead. I did it over and over again and built up my confidence while I worked on making my balance better.

Being out there also made me think a lot about life balance. My body needs to move and my spirit needs to have moments in nature in order for me to feel well. I am in a very fortunate position where I don’t need to work around a work schedule. I have created new work and purpose for myself. I am now in control of where and how I want to direct that meaningful work. My life is more balanced than it used to be.

Last week I got out skiing again. I am still astonishingly slow and was passed by an older gentleman. Somehow he passed me twice. Slow and steady worked well for me. I stayed out for over an hour which was twice as long as I planned due to a decision I made to go a little farther which turned out to be much farther. I had plenty of time to think about how my tracks showed me where I’ve been and the vision I have for where I want to go.

A few of my thoughts included:

Looking back to see where I’ve been has its merits. I see my accomplishments. I can linger over happy memories. I also see if anyone is trying to pass me for a third time! However, the direction I want to go is forward so I need to focus on the path ahead of me and notice where it branches out.

I realized I looked down at my feet an awful lot to ensure I wasn’t hitting an icy patch. It seemed like I needed my gaze downward to keep my bearings. I can be just as safe looking up and looking forward, if not safer. There’s more to see. There is trust involved. I plan to continue looking forward.

One of the reasons I like cross-country skiing is because I don’t have to go down hills. I enjoyed downhill skiing in younger days. Not sure how that would work for me now. Cross-country skiing can still have hilly segments. I purposely choose flat routes. There inevitably are stretches where the trail slopes downward ever so slightly so that you take a break and coast. I usually fight these sections and actively attempt to slow myself down so that I don’t lose my balance and fall. It’s more work to fight these changes than to coast. This time I gave myself over to coasting. Less work felt good. I was safe and had nothing to fear. I plan to work smarter, not harder. Coasting may enable me to pick up speed and give me more energy.

Changing my route allows me to explore a new path. I thought I knew how I was changing my route but I miscalculated the distance. Life is exactly like this. There are miscalculations. None of us really knows how long we’ll stay on our current path before it changes. I love seeing paths turn ahead of me. It adds a little mystery to my walk, hike, or whatever. The path is revealed slowly as I move along.

I am about to mark my eighth year living with metastatic breast cancer. I can reflect on these years by comparing them to time on a ski trail. There have been paths where I’ve been wobbly. I’ve been sprawled out flat on my back hoping someone would happen by to help me up when I couldn’t get myself situated to do it on my own. I figured it out eventually. I’ve never liked relying on someone else to fix things for me that I should be able to manage on my own. Some paths have been straight, flat, and easy to navigate. It was easier to coast in younger days. There have been twists and turns I didn’t see coming. I didn’t know where I was going but it was clear I’d be on a specific route longer than I had planned and I had to keep moving forward. Sometimes I could backtrack and retrace my route. Sometimes I hoped I was closer to finishing and turning back would make things longer and harder. I can’t go back and retrace my steps with cancer. My hope is that the bit around the next turn I can’t see is a beautiful part of the trail that works well for me.

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A favorite trail in a favorite place

Ralph Waldo Emerson said it best – “What lies behind you and what lies in front of you, pales in comparison to what lies inside of you.”

My past and future, those tracks and visions, are influenced by my inner voice. What I see is dictated by how I interpret what I see and experience. My tracks, vision, and inner voice are all tied together into one intricately woven path leading forward. Onward!

Balance and Tightropes

A hush falls over the crowd. Lights are dimmed and all eyes in the big top are fixed upward. Suspenseful music keeps everyone in a trance where they don’t dare look away. A man dressed in a white leotard and a billowing white blouse inches across a wire. He holds a long pole stretching out at each side to help establish some sense of equilibrium. Finally, he makes it to the other side. The man bows dramatically to the applauding audience below, but he isn’t finished. He attaches a small round disc to a pole that rises up over his head. An equally bedazzled woman climbs onto his shoulders and positions herself on the circle where she exhibits grace (as well as a lot of trust to her partner) while performing carefully orchestrated yoga poses while the man makes his way back to where he started. The two execute a carefully choreographed dance in a beautiful example of synchronicity, faith, and above all else . . . balance.

Tight rope walkers balance beautifully and skillfully. Their world is high above on a thin steel wire. They make their work look effortless. From below, their balancing act is often stressful to watch.

Our tightrope walkers take their time because it matters to be careful and pay attention to detail. It takes training to do it right. It also takes training for us to walk our metaphorical tightropes successfully. Finding balance in day to day life can be as challenging as on the hire wire.

Finding balance is all about figuring out what you value and then aligning your activities and time spent on those values.

I am clear on what I value and have successfully matched those values to chosen activities. It’s tougher to manage my time so I stay balanced and am not overwhelmed.

Finding balance while living with cancer challenges me almost daily. It seems these days treatment and health appointments are scheduled almost weekly. I spend time on some aspect of fundraising for more metastatic breast cancer research almost every day. Focusing on it can consume a lot of my time. It is exciting, worthwhile, and entirely my choice. It also stresses me out.

How do I fix it? I won’t stop my fundraising efforts. I am getting good results even though it is taking a lot of time. Hard work and effort yield positive results. The solution could involve less blogging, but I don’t want this to be the case. Oncology medical stuff gets a lot of my time. Both blogging and fundraising are taking the majority of the time I have left. I’m not balanced. FYI – if there is a week where I do not post, I am more than fine. It means I just needed a break. Something has to give. It isn’t going to be me.

Spending more time in nature is going to be a conscious effort on my part.

Reading is going to be scheduled, which makes me feel a little too structured, but I need to do it in order to create more balance.

Working out will continue to be a priority.

I am going to schedule downtime and just BE.

Doing some sort of meditative practice again will help. Even if it’s only five minutes a day, the benefits will affect everything else.

Accepting help will also be good. I can think of two examples where I recently did this and I was okay not controlling everything.

One powerful word that I’ve found to give me more personal balance is the word NO. Leave work at work. Respectfully decline an invitation if you have no other plans than not having any other plans. It’s perfectly acceptable to say no without having to explain or justify your reasons. Not explaining is freeing. It goes something like this: “No, I can’t make it. Thank you.” It’s polite and firm. It’s worth asking why anyone really needs more information if you have already said no.

“Balance is not better time management, but rather better boundary management. Balance means making choices and enjoying those choices.” ~ Betsy Jacobson

Holding boundaries I have set with others will absolutely help me achieve more personal balance. Boundaries define what I will accept from others. They reflect how I show love to myself. When I apply the idea of boundary management to myself,  I still believe there is time management involved. How I choose to spend my time and energy is important.

Balance is a mixture of boundaries, priorities, choices, and time. How much of my day is reasonable to dedicate to writing and fundraising? My plans are to exercise in the morning, do whatever my work is that day in the afternoon, read at night. Yes, I’ll need to be flexible, but one day isn’t going to be consumed by anything – unless it’s a medical day. Those are still pretty consuming.

Squirrels know how to balance really well. Those darn creatures scamper across telephone poles with speed and ease. What makes this so? Does the squirrel lead a balanced life? I’ve always thought it must be rather monotonous. All they do is dig and bury things, chase one another, and run on wires. They dash out into roads and dart out of traffic just in time. They try to get into my squirrel proof bird feeder to no avail. Is this the squirrel version of work, play, and risk-taking? Maybe they have it all figured out.

I don’t think squirrels know more than I do. My brain is considerably bigger. I think the telephone wire is much like the sidewalk. It’s all proportional. I don’t fall off the sidewalk just as the squirrel doesn’t fall from the wire. But I still feel like I lose my balance from time to time.

We all lose our balance. It’s inevitable, and when it happens, it’s important to reset to your own vibration and needs and not to someone else’s. A person living well with cancer will be balanced differently from someone else. I know I keep searching for an answer on how this best works for me. It changes a lot.

The goal of finding balance is not to be a tight rope walker walking without a net and balancing someone on your shoulders while juggling bowling balls. The goal of finding balance should be to be mindful of what you are choosing to do with your time and feeling a lightness with those choices. I want to stay in that space where balance and lightness meet. Some call it peace. Some call it happiness. Some call it breathing. It all circles back to loving self-care so you don’t have to feel like you’re walking on a tightrope. Leave that balancing act to the professionals.