Merchandising Cancer

I am pretty sure I’ll offend people today.

I offend myself. I have reservations if I should even post what I’ve written. It looks like I have despite my doubts.

I know my thoughts surrounding merchandising cancer have an angry tone. I am not sorry for it and won’t apologize. I get to feel angry that people make money off a disease that kills. I get to feel angry that people buy t-shirts and mugs rather than donate directly to research. I get to feel angry that I put myself through agony in an effort to change even one person’s attitude about breast cancer merchandise.

Offensive Section

Are you someone who feels okay with pink ribbon shirts? Somehow these are big business whereas merchandising other demographics would be abominations.

Think about these scenarios:

Alcoholism and drug addiction merchandise. Those who conquer these demons work hard every single day. It just isn’t necessary to wear their sobriety on their sleeve. Chips are awarded as small recognition for major achievements. The first chip is earned after 24 hours. It’s not a market for profit. April is designated as Alcohol Awareness Month but it doesn’t garner the same kind of attention that cold beer at sporting events attracts.

Where are the COVID shirts? It’s current and global. Or would those be in poor taste?

Yes, they would be in horrible taste. Sadly, there probably will be some that eventually surface. Maybe they already have. The 200,000+ who have died won’t be given a second thought. The global death toll has topped over a million.

Where are the shirts featuring funeral homes, coffins, or grave markers? We all will use these in some form or another at some point. Why not celebrate it with cute shirts? People wouldn’t have to worry about what to wear to funerals. This captive audience isn’t being targeted.

Because it’s wrong, offensive, sick, and unthinkable.

Pinkwashing

Pinkwashing is when a company uses breast cancer to promote itself and its products or services. Often there is no support of breast cancer charities at all.

None of what I suggested should be merchandised. Somehow though, it’s allowable to profit off cancer.

You may see pink. I see death. I see the coffins and the funerals. I see visits to cemeteries. I don’t understand why someone needs a shirt to celebrate every day in October. I have read such stories from people who own a pink shirt to wear each day in the name of awareness.

A t-shirt typically is priced around $25. It totals $775 if you have a different one for each day in October. Ask for a donation to cancer research and it sounds like a bizarre idea to some because nothing tangible is gained from donating.

Facebook Comments

I see too many ads on Facebook that have around 2 thousand comments. Merchandising cancer is a business, pure and simple.

 If two thousand people put $25 each toward metastatic breast cancer research, it would total $50,000.

The following are actual comments from Facebook with names removed. They all push my buttons in some form. My takeaway is there are an awful lot of people who easily fall prey to a pretty pink product and pink messaging and all the pinkwashing that Pinktober brings.

Sending prayers to all my tired 6 years ago but I won …hang in there lady’s you can beat it to

(We all make an occasional typo, but lack of punctuation and correct grammar makes this hard to decipher. This is how the comment was written word for word.)

Be strong you! You can order this shirt here:

Omg love this….. it’s so true!!9 years and counting.

Love this shirt! I need this!!!!!

I need this for October which is breast cancer awareness month

My daughter is fighting right now she has her last chemo treatment on the 17th this is what she would say. I just pray we can say it’s gone and she can ring that bell… god bless you all ❤️❤️

OMG I NEED THIS SHIRT!!!!

So cute!

Beautiful

Fight!Fight!Fight!!!!

ABSOLUTELY love this, I’m a 35plus year Survivor, I’m getting this 

I am in that fight myself, but I have God on my side.

Quite a few just type words like blessings, prayers, hugs, or use several prayer and heart emojis.

There are a couple emojis I have in mind that I am tempted to use. Yes, those.

I’ve ranted on a few of these sites out of frustration and anger. I don’t think it does much. Direct replies to others’ comments are my new strategy. By focusing on individuals, I hope to make a difference one by one. Information presented without my angry tone may be more effective. I don’t mind if anyone reading wants to join me and use my comments.

Here are a few of my attempts:

I can understand if wearing a shirt helps you feel strong right now. None of the proceeds from these shirts go to breast cancer research. I feel strong when I advocate and donate for more research.

Have you considered donating to breast cancer research? Thank you if you already have.

Nothing from sales goes towards research. Nothing! If two thousand people put $25 each toward metastatic breast cancer research that would total $50,000. Is wearing a “cute” shirt that “you have to have” really the way you want to go? There’s nothing cute about cancer. Having this shirt does nothing for research. Many thanks if you’ve donated to research. Always check where your contributions go and how they are used.

A more recent trend has been for people to comment on their breast cancer status and their diagnosis. There is no mention of their interest or thoughts on the advertised shirt. The comment is entirely focused on their personal experience. These folks are looking for a support group. I fail to see the connection to an ad campaign where their experience has not been solicited. These comments usually get a comment from the company as a reply with a link to order the shirt. That is really inappropriate. It’s especially low when someone has commented someone died from cancer and it’s clear they are in pain.

Businesses profit off cancer. They don’t care.

A charity or fundraiser makes money to benefit cancer care or research. They do care.

Is there a place for pink?

Are all shirts and other pink merchandise inherently bad? No. I will admit there are a few I like that convey hope. I still won’t order one based on principle and my goal to support research. I understand there are people who buy them in the name of advocacy and believe they are promoting awareness by wearing them. Maybe they have. I have yet to read a valuable comment that connects wearing the shirt to advocacy plans.

I am not against awareness. Walks and runs are important. They give hope and a sense of agency. They raise money. Fundraiser dinners and events do the same thing. Awareness must be tied to action that directly supports the cause and purpose at hand.

I am also not against pink. There are several women I know who have used it for the right reasons and recognize the metastatic community is part of their work. I am grateful for them.

If t-shirts were the answer, I would have been handed one upon diagnosis and sent on my merry way. Pinkwashing makes me blue. Mostly red with anger. Merchandise isn’t lifesaving. Merchandise lines the pockets of the business executives. Merchandise follows demand. I dream of the day when there is no demand because there are cures for all cancers.

Research can save lives.

Not pink.

Instead

Today’s theme is based around the word instead. I cannot fathom why some wrong ideology continues to persist around breast cancer and breast cancer awareness instead of shifting to concepts and vocabulary that is more truthful.

Exercise and nutrition do not prevent cancer any more than they can cure cancer.

Instead . . . exercise and nutrition reduce risk and can improve anyone’s health. This is true for reducing the risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and any number of diseases, but it is not a guarantee.

Don’t tell me I look good, or even worse don’t say that I’m pale, look tired, or must not be feeling well. I realize my summer pale shade will fade to my usual pale, but pale is how I look. I’ve been pale my entire life.

Instead . . . tell me it’s good to see me. It’s very welcoming and removes all assessments of how I look or how I’m feeling. It’s that simple.

Promoting mammograms and early detection as saving lives is not accurate. 30% of early stage breast cancers go on to become metastatic. Mammograms and early detection are not cures. There is no cause and effect relationship between early detection and assured survival. Identifying breast cancer at an early stage is certainly preferable as to when it’s already stage IV. There is enormous value in finding it early. A person has a shot at a normal life. Mammograms are neither prevention nor a cure. They do not catch all breast cancers and they do not catch all the ones that they do at an early stage. Mammograms do not reduce risk. Mammograms are good, yet imperfect, diagnostic tools.

Instead . . . people must be informed so they know the chances of recurrence.

  • 30% of cases will have a recurrence. Forgive the repetition.

One reason metastatic breast cancer, or metastatic cancer of any type, is difficult for people to learn about is it’s scary and no one wants to think it could be them. People who have finished formal treatment want to be done. They use the words cancer free and cured freely. There is no way of knowing how I’d feel if I had been diagnosed at an early stage because it wasn’t my reality, but I think I would have been mortified if someone kept shoving the statistics and signs of MBC in front of my face when I was doing my best to be done with it. And shoving is what I imagine it would feel like. Maybe it’s a similar feeling to how I feel when the barrage of pink comes my way almost every blasted day in October. I want it to go away and leave me alone. If I want something pink, I will buy pink flowers or drink Pepto-Bismol.

Instead . . . we all need to be more compassionate and respectful. I include myself in this statement because I can have a tough time understanding how some friends and family just don’t get it.

This idea of otherness rather than togetherness is one reason why there are separate support groups for earlier stage survivors and those with stage IV. Out of sight, out of mind. Different conversations. True, yet some of those conversations are worth having together. If not together, there must be a way to provide information about warning signs. Those with earlier stage cancer do not want to think about cancer returning or it turning metastatic. They want to believe they are cured. There is no such thing. There is remission. There is hope that it is in a person’s past. Hope is not to be underestimated. For many, it will be in the past. It won’t be for that 30%. That’s roughly 1 out of 3 survivors.

Instead . . . people need to be educated so they know what warning signs to look for.

Signs of metastatic breast cancer to other areas may show up as the following symptoms:

  • Brain – Frequent headaches / Vomiting / Dizziness / Impaired intellectual functioning / Mood swings / Balance issues / Fatigue
  • Bone – Bone pain commonly felt in back, arms, ribs, or thighs with no obvious cause.
  • Lymph nodes – Swelling in chest, armpits, or neck areas.
  • Lung – Sharp pains when breathing in / Fatigue
  • Liver – Pain near ribs on right side / Bloating / Weight loss / Changes in appetite / Fatigue

Patients often feel like they need to agree unwaveringly to everything their doctor suggests. They fear they will be labeled as difficult, have less time spent on them, or that they will receive subpar care if they disagree with management. I hope not.

Instead . . . patients must ask questions and be their own best advocates.

Here are some possible statements and questions:

  • I don’t understand. This information contradicts something else I’ve been told. Here is what I’ve heard/read. Can you explain it to me again?
  • What are the risks of this treatment? What are the side effects?
  • Why is this recommended for me? Is there something else to try?
  • Are there clinical trials here or through another clinic/center/hospital?
  • I need (fill in the blank – a hopeful approach, a second opinion, more information, less information, stronger meds, different meds, different communication, etc).
  • I am experiencing (fatigue, neuropathy, lack of appetite, depression, etc.). What can I do to address it?
  • That isn’t what I said/asked. Let me try again.

When someone dies from breast cancer, sometimes the phrase “from breast cancer complications” is used. It seems to be one of many hot button phrases this fall.

Is metastatic disease a complication?

Reporting death as a result of breast cancer complications needs to stop. Many illnesses that can be fatal can be brought on due to low white blood counts because of a weakened immune system from treatments. This includes the flu and pneumonia. Organs like the kidneys, liver, and lungs fail or shut down. Organ failure is not a complication. Metastatic cancer is the only kind of cancer people die from. My opinion is they don’t die from it so much as they are killed by it.

Instead . . . say killed. Metastatic cancer kills.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month gets under my skin more each year. I don’t think I’d mind awareness so much if it had the right drivers.

Pink products do not cure cancer. They do not appropriately fund (or fund at all) research. They do precious little to raise awareness. Awareness should not be tied to pink merchandise with no other messaging than a color. Do I want a glittery pink dog on a t-shirt? I do not. Is a pink mug with some clever slogan going to make my treatment more effective? It is not. What does all this pink do?

People buy these products in the name of awareness and they are unaware that very little goes to research, and that an even smaller slice goes to research for metastatic breast cancer. Do your research and know how your donation to any charity or foundation where you contribute is being used.

Instead . . . when you see pink merchandise, respectfully inquire about where the money is going and how it’s used. Then educate about other alternatives that support research.

Pink isn’t even applicable to me. It’s as if I’m excluded from the very awareness month that should recognize me.

And there it is.

I don’t truly belong because I don’t have breast cancer.

I have metastatic breast cancer.

Many in the MBC community feel royally miffed (including myself) that there isn’t more of a focus on metastatic breast cancer during October, and I think I’ve figured out that perhaps the intention was never to focus on us. We get a day out of the month. This year it was Oct. 13th.

Thanks?

The colors for metastatic breast cancer are green, teal, and pink. Green represents the triumph of spring over winter, life over death, and symbolizes renewal, hope, and immortality. Teal symbolizes healing and spirituality. The pink ribbon represents that cancer originated in the breast. I don’t want a ribbon, or a bracelet, or a t-shirt.

Instead . . . I want the money spent on those items to go toward research for more treatment options for metastatic breast cancer. After a quick internet search, I discovered I could buy a pack of 50 pink breast cancer pins ranging between $40 to $50. How many of those pins are out there? You do the math.

Now, consider the mugs, bracelets, t-shirts, and other pink nonsense.

Next, consider what might be possible if the money spent on all those products were directed to stage IV research.

Stage IV needs more.

Rather than buying pink products, you can donate to my Nifty 50 Fundraiser. 100% goes to metastatic breast cancer research at UW Carbone (also known as the More for Stage IV Fund).

Do that instead.