A History of the Number 13

Superstitious people avoid the number 13.

Floors in tall buildings skip from 12 to 14. People don’t like sitting in the 13th row on airplanes. Friday the 13th is considered an unlucky day. There were 13 people at The Last Supper and many still refuse to have 13 people gathered around a table. I ruled out a home while house hunting because the number 13 appeared in the address. My dad also died on a Friday the 13th. It could have been any day, it just happened to fall on that date. It’s weird that I’m able to rationalize the date he died on but can’t with a house address. Maybe I’m a little superstitious.

Hold on 13 seconds. Let’s take a closer look at the number.

America began with 13 colonies. There were 13 stars on the first flags. Those are not bad things. The number 13 is a beautiful prime number mathematically speaking.

Countries that have a strong western influence believe 13 to be unlucky (like the U.S.). Some countries believe 13 is a lucky number. Italy is one country that considers 13 highly lucky because it’s connected to St. Anthony, the patron saint of finding things. India also considers 13 to be lucky. Whatever you do on the 13th lunar day is meant to give you positive results.

There used to be 13 months on our calendar instead of 12. Back in Pagan times, this related to the 13 moon cycles we have every year. The moon is considered to have powerful feminine energy. It corresponds to menstrual cycles that last 29 days. Women cycle the way the moon does. The number 13 represents a continual cycle of rebirth and death. There is fertility and creation. The moon’s energy is the biggest correlation I found to exalting a woman’s spiritual energy and power.

So far none of this is bad or unlucky.

So how did 13 become unlucky?

Men of yore were the problem. Booooooo men of yore.

When Christianity became popular, civilization became ruled by the patriarchy. They made some big changes affecting women. The goddess Freya (goddess of love, her name closely associated with Friday) was labeled a witch. Ridiculous. Friday the 13th became known as the day when 12 witches met with the Devil. Absolute rubbish. Add that up and you get 13.

Buckle up beacause we’re going back even further to Biblical Times all the way to ancient Israel and the Old Testament. This is a time when women had more power and were revered. Women were active in community life except in the priesthood. Women freely engaged in commerce and real estate. Impressive. Specifically, Miriam (sister of Moses) led the women of Israel in worship. Deborah was a judge and a prophetess as well as a wife and mother. Highly impressive. Abigail is mentioned because she managed a political conflict between King David and her husband. Intelligent wives were considered gifts from God. Wow and wow.

My how times changes in the New Testament. Somewhere men seized the opportunity to suppress women. Women’s lives didn’t extend beyond the family. Women were largely illiterate. Men and women were not seen together. Women did not go out in public often and needed to be accompanied by an enslaved member of the household. Jesus seemed to the exception to this rule. He shared his teachings to anyone who would listen. There are stories of Mary and Martha, Mary Magdalene, and the woman at the well. Still, this was not the norm.

If I am wrong with any of this, enlighten me, please. Biblical study is not a strength.

It is believed that some women in the Middle Ages were scribes.

Men simply did not like women having power. Some still don’t. Look at the inequalities of representation in politics, women in other leadership positions, and in pay. Then there are the labels of being assertive versus being a bitch. Many girls are denied an education in certain countries.

Friday the 13th, or an ordinary 13th in the month, is a perfect day to reflect on who you are, your purpose, and your power. Focus on the powerful feminine within and let it flow out to the universe. Let that creativity and power shine.

There is one day allotted to metastatic breast cancer during October. That sucks. It’s October 13th. How I wish all the awareness would level up and address the urgency of research for MBC. If Metastatic Breast Cancer Day has to be on the 13th, it’s more than okay with me. I acknowledge that men get breast cancer and metastatic breast cancer, but here is my message to women. We women can embrace the power the number 13 holds and do our best to change the world.

There is a chance 13 may become a favorite number of mine. Incidentally, I just began my 13th drug. Lucky 13 it is!