Pelican Lessons

Sanoviv Medical Institute is situated on the Baja Peninsula in Rosarito, Mexico. It’s built on a cliff looking out at the Pacific Ocean. Every day seems sunny. A lulling symphony of rolling and crashing waves repeats itself over and over. It’s a small hospital that specializes in functional medicine and both integrative and alternative treatments. Many guests visit for a health retreat. A smaller group of guests are patients with more serious health conditions. Research there focuses on how immunity can be supported at the cellular level in fighting disease and optimizing one’s best health. The physical, mind, and spirit are all important components of a healthy individual.

I left Wisconsin for Sanoviv almost as soon as my school year ended in 2016. My goals included strengthening my immunity, detoxing my body, and learning more successful ways to deal with stress. I was open to hearing what they recommended in terms of treating cancer. My oncologist at home was curious and doubted anything would interfere with my current protocol. I wouldn’t be missing any treatments at home by going. Neuropathy had taken a toll on my poor feet. I was also suffering from painful hand-foot syndrome. Of particular interest to me were the options for treating disease from a cellular level after disease had already happened. I signed up for a three-week cancer support program. If nothing else, I was off to Mexico in an idyllic setting and getting away from my life at home. It was even better if my health improved.

There are many moments from that trip etched away both in my memories and in a book that exists in a forever state of revision. I met people from as far away as Nigeria, Australia, and China, and as close to home as Chicago. My days were scheduled from 6 AM to about 7 PM. Some of it was not pleasant, but many parts of it were filled with beauty, purpose, and deep lessons. What I want to share briefly are my memories of the pelicans.

Pelicans flew along the coastline daily. I had never held any affection for these birds. I thought them big, ugly, and dirty looking. If a bird could be fishy, pelicans were fishy as well. My opinion transformed at Sanoviv watching these strong and graceful birds. I admired how they would pass by in single file while floating on an air current. It was like each bird was connected to another with an invisible string. They reminded me of bikers drafting behind a lead bike so as to block the wind and use less energy, an idea which bikers got from birds no less. At other times the pelicans arranged themselves in groups of four like in fighter jet formation. Wings tucked in for increased speed, yet they still managed to stay in unison with each other. These birds had an unspoken quiet beauty no matter how I saw them.

I had a very special pelican sighting on my last full day. I was sitting up in a special care area receiving IVs, looking out at the ocean in a bit of a daze, lost in thought. Far out on the hazy horizon, I saw a somewhat shapeless form. I wondered if they were pelicans, but they were too far away. Whatever it was resembled the v-shaped way a child draws birds flying in pictures. As the shapeless form drew closer, it moved off to the left and changed shaped, now reminding me more of a swarm of bees. From where I sat, I temporarily lost sight of the changing shape and figured that was the end of it.

But it was not. The shape was a small group of about four or five pelicans who were just hugging the coastline. Soon enough, they came back into view and flew by my window in a single file in one long, continuous silent flow. It was as if the pelicans were saying goodbye and purposely saluting me with their waving wings. It was a beautiful and peaceful moment that I will never forget.

Here is one of those perfect times where everything fits together magically. In the animal spirit world, pelicans symbolize regeneration and resourcefulness. I was at Sanoviv to heal and re-energize. The pelican population had dwindled in the past but presently has bounced back. Pelicans also represent resilience and determination. My spirit is filled with this same resilience and determination. My mindset is of one determined path just like the single line of the pelicans’ flight. A greater force was absolutely at work in bringing pelicans to me day after day after day. Signs are always there. I don’t believe it’s all a coincidence.

I didn’t get all the answers I wanted at Sanoviv. I arrived home feeling healthier than I had in a long time. My energy was better, my cholesterol was lower, and I felt happy. New scans were scheduled at home. These showed that returning to a more traditional form of chemotherapy was in my best interests. I would have had the same results if my scans had been scheduled before I went to Mexico. It’s interesting that one of the things I’m currently receiving today is what they suggested as my best option almost three years ago. The drug was not being used in the U.S. in exactly the same capacity as in Mexico, so I got a big fat NO from my oncologist at home. It was an FDA thing. Now it’s FDA approved.

I quickly made decisions and turned my life upside-down once more. Nothing was how I wanted it. Very little seemed the same. Life looks very different to me now. I have been resourceful, resilient, and determined, just like the pelican. Where everything isn’t perfect, I am still here. I am finding a way.

Lessons of resourcefulness, resilience, and determination are important for all of us. We all have stories where life hasn’t turned out as we planned. Many events are outside our control. We almost always think we have more control over events than we actually do. How we respond when life becomes hard is important. There is always a choice to respond positively or negatively. We all have opportunities to adapt, regroup, and come back to either try again or go in a new direction. We rest and give it another go, approaching challenges from new angles and perspectives. We all have more grit, strength, and determination than we think we do.

We are an awful lot like pelicans.

Many times we glide with grace.

Other times we need to be in fighter jet formation.

 

Consider responding:

  • When have you needed to depend on resourcefulness, resilience, and determination?

Exercise is the New Sugar

Sixty is the new forty. Eighty is the new sixty. Cocktails infused with mushrooms are said to be all the rage. Small weekend trips may replace bigger vacations. I’ve heard iTunes is out. Everywhere I turn, I seem to hear about a new trend or way of thinking.

Here is one of my own: Exercise is the new sugar.

This may not be new knowledge for many, but it is for me. I have said before that I have sweet teeth instead of just one sweet tooth. I will always love sugar. I am trying to love it less these days. I would love it if I could crave exercise like I crave desserts. It works for a while and then my love affair with sugar returns. All I can do is to keep trying. This week I felt more successful in eliminating some of the refined sugar in my world.

Every day is an opportunity for a fresh start.

Exercise feeds us better than sugar for many reasons.

Exercise and Cognitive Benefits

Exercise can give you the same effects that sugar does in terms of a quick energy boost, only with exercise the effects are long-lasting and healthy. For example, exercise improves cognitive functioning. A person’s focus is sharper due to boosted energy caused by higher endorphin levels. Exercise also improves memory. Sugar does the opposite by increasing glucose levels that slow cognitive functioning. Have you ever noticed that your brain works better after exercise and the opposite is true with too much sugar?

Exercise and Endorphin Levels

There’s more about to say about those endorphin levels. Exercise increases endorphin levels. I’ve heard that your body craves exercise and movement. When your body moves a lot, it releases chemicals like endorphins, dopamine, and serotonin as a reward for your efforts. The result is you feel fantastic and have loads of energy. Sugar makes you feel good for a few moments but has addictive qualities that keep you craving it without any positive rewards. It’s a vicious cycle of falling levels of blood sugar that you need to literally keep feeding more sugar because your body feels lousy if it doesn’t get its sugar fix. In the long run (or even just a solid walk), exercise will make a person feel happier.

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A good solid walk can boost endorphin levels.

Exercise Combats Depression and Anxiety

Reduced depression and anxiety is another benefit of regular exercise. Both high-intensity aerobic exercise and low-intensity exercise like yoga have been found to reduce depression and anxiety.

Sugar also affects mood, but much differently than exercise. It has been correlated to higher levels of tension, depression, and anxiety. Personally, it’s so much easier to reach for cookies when I’m upset or sad than to go for a walk or work out. The cookie is instant gratification. I feel comforted for a few minutes. Working out takes longer for feeling better to kick in, but I feel like I’ve accomplished something good for myself when I’m done and feel more positive.

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Yoga can reduce depression and anxiety.

Exercise Lowers Disease Risk

Exercise decreases the risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and certain types of cancers. It increases your chances of living longer. Of course it does! Sugar is associated with higher risks of health problems and diseases. There are many studies proving or denying sugar’s role in cancer formation or sugar fueling cancer. One seemingly reputable study seems to disprove another that seems as equally reputable. I’m not going to change anyone’s mind on what you already believe. I will, however, provide links to two sources where I often find research I tend to trust. Check out these articles at WebMD and the Mayo Clinic on sugar and cancer.

Is there a link? My opinion is a firm maybe. For me, I believe I’d be healthier if I consumed less sugar.

So Many Benefits

Exercise does a body good. It increases energy levels. Exercise is good for muscle and bones. Weight lifting is especially good for muscles and bones. It’s a must do as people age and lose muscle mass. As early as age 30, a person can lose 5% of muscle mass every ten years. Muscle atrophy happens fast for cancer patients because of decreased levels or lack of physical activity. It takes time to rebuild lost muscle mass.

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Focus more on proper form than how much the weight weighs. Proper form helps you stay safe and healthy.

Exercise can help with weight loss. Maintaining a healthy body weight is important at any age. Unfortunately, metabolism slows as a person ages, and regular exercise helps in those efforts to keep movement and activity a priority. Someone with cancer doesn’t need to do much to gain or lose weight. I’ve both put on weight and lost weight while maintaining the same exercise routine throughout many different cancer treatments. It’s been very frustrating to gain weight when I continued to work out, but I had the peace of mind that I was doing what I could to stay strong whatever number stared up at me from the bathroom scale. Exercise will change the way your body looks on the outside and the inside. Illness is harder to take hold in a healthy inner environment.

Sugar is good for making fat, fat, fat. Your liver makes and stores glucose depending on your body needs. Excess sugars that don’t get converted become fat. Too much refined sugar and high fructose corn syrup can attribute to liver disease. High fructose corn syrup is an unnatural sweetener made from cornstarch and found as the main ingredient in many sweet treats and foods. Foods high in sugar attribute to weight gain. That’s nothing new. I find that if I take the time the read the ingredient label listed on some of the sweets I crave before eating them that I get disgusted and can walk away. It’s a good hack.

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All image credits today are from pexels.com.

Here is where I am: If sixty truly is the new forty, my chronological age suggests I should feel like I’m thirty. Newsflash – I don’t. I feel much older than I actually am due to what my body has endured. Cocktails with mushrooms are out for me because I cut out alcohol years before diagnosis. Alcohol ages a person. I also was just getting the hang of iTunes. I hope I can figure out whatever is next. I like the idea of weekend trips. I’m all in for those.

Exercise needs to be my new sugar.

Someone please remind me I believe this the next time I start to go a little crazy and feed my sugar cravings.

Three Rules to Get Biking Again

One sunny day in early April, I decided it was time to pump up the tires on my bike and take it out for a test run. Truth be told, it was just as much of a test run for me, too.

Every year I wonder how I’m going to fare with many of my sportier endeavors. Will I still be able to hike? Can I bike? Am I slower? How far can I go? What kind of energy level will I have? Will I be able to maintain it? Lots of questions bombard my mind, and I can’t answer any of them until I get out there and see what happens. I visualize doing all my physical goals effortlessly and flawlessly. Visualizing success is a healthy practice. It can frustrate me when I don’t visualize the small steps to reach my goal, but I’m getting better, slowly.

Last summer biking was tougher for me. Little changes in incline bothered me and I fatigued too quickly from the extra exertion. If I rode too far, the final stretch was interrupted with lots of rest stops. It always happened in the second half of the ride. I ended rides thoroughly exhausted feeling like an old crump. The strength and cardio work I had done in other activities didn’t transfer over to biking. Last summer was hard.

Each year it feels like I’m starting over.

I held one rule heading into this spring’s inaugural ride: Easy Does It.

I biked close to home and biked around the neighborhood. Any hills were neither steep nor long. I was ready for home after only fifteen minutes. My goal was thirty minutes, so I kept pedaling, thinking of flat routes that wouldn’t challenge me. I kept talking to myself, repeating my rule to take it easy. There was no need to push. I’ve had a tendency to push myself hard. Pushing too hard is what caused some of the hardness and disappointments last summer in the biking and hiking departments. On the other hand, sometimes I’ve had to push hard to be heard, to assert myself at school, or to travel places. No one else was going to do the work for me, nor should they.

Here on my bike, I didn’t have to go fast. Easy does it. Take my time. Remember to breathe. Coasting offered welcomed breaks to reset and normalize my breathing.

A couple other rules took shape on my test ride.

Rule #2: Enjoy It.

On that particular day, I was just out to get my bearings. I needed to do some self-assessment. I enjoy a good pace if I can handle it, but I bike more for recreation. I am not interested in doing a Tour de France. If the ride became too hard and I wasn’t having any fun, I was less likely to do it again. I do hobbies I enjoy, not those I despise.

There are plenty of parts of my life (medical parts) that I do not enjoy. I am very intentional about my choices with the rest of it. Having fun is part of my well-being.

I love biking on Wisconsin’s bike trails. There are some beautiful routes that pass alongside farms, woods, and prairies. My favorite provides a perfect mixture of sun and shade.

Rule #3: Practice Makes Perfect.

The more I practice, the better I get. It was a small sign of encouragement that stayed up as a permanent poster in my classroom for years. I will build on each small success and every ride. Greatness takes time. Professional athletes train for years to make hard work look effortless and flawless. I forget this often when so many of my attempts are filled with concerted effort and countless flaws. Failing is tough. Failing teaches us how to be better and stronger. Failing is valued practice, and practice makes perfect.

Here’s the thing – I don’t need perfection. For my purposes, I’ll define perfect as being fit enough to do the long bike rides I want with confidence and strength. It means I will enjoy the ride and relish in greatness when I get it. Repetition and practice bring me what I need for happiness, not perfection.

Maybe the saying about practice needs to shift from making something perfect to bringing happiness.

These three rules got me biking again. They will work for me when I go out on my next several rides. I hope they can help anyone who is ready to embark on a new physical activity. Maybe it doesn’t even need to be anything physical. Any new activity would work. Easy does it. Slow down and don’t go too fast or push too hard. You’ll get where you’re going. Things have a way of working out. It’s okay to take your time and get something right.

Life is meant to be enjoyed. I don’t believe we are here to be unhappy or to suffer. I want to take every opportunity for happiness that comes my way. I will seek out happiness. Some parts of life come easily. Hopefully, many things are easy. There undoubtedly will be a few flops ranging from tiny to colossal, but mine have taught me needed lessons. I keep practicing. Life is a mixture of enjoyment and practice.

I finished my ride and reached my thirty-minute goal. My body felt more than ready to be done. I worked hard, but I could still walk, talk, and otherwise function normally. All good signs I didn’t overdo. I have learned (through failure) that it’s good to stop physical activity before it stops me. My energy level was so good I even tackled a couple of tasks outdoors before heading inside.

My test run was very successful. My bike worked fine and so did I. Going on that ride made me feel empowered. There was a strong sense of accomplishment that left me feeling refreshed and energized. I had control of something in my life. I had forgotten how good I (eventually) feel after a bike ride. My heart felt stronger and each breath was fuller and deeper. I felt more confident to handle other challenges.

I still need to figure out how to handle some fatigue issues. My anxiety button gets pushed too quickly when pedaling becomes hard. Then anxiety pushes my panic button. Hopefully, my “Easy Does It” reminder will kick in at these times and keep panic far away.

Time has passed and now it’s June. I can bike from home to do a couple short bike trails. My next step is to put the rack on my car so I can do rides that gradually lengthen. As long as they remain relatively flat my enjoyment level will stay high. I plan to enjoy many beautiful rides that make me feel fit and healthy throughout the long summer.

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Here I am taking a break on my favorite trail in 2017.

Consider responding:

  • How do you apply Easy Does It?
  • What are some guiding rules for your life?

 

What’s at Your Core?

Everyone has core themes – themes that make you who you are. Identifying what these are as an individual is a huge part in understanding your identity. Core themes become part of a healing plan because when you know who you are, you know your strengths. Leaning into your strengths can lead to faster healing.

We should always align what we do with our core beliefs. It’s part of being well and being happy. We all need to live our truths and core values.

I hadn’t thought much about my themes other than I was a teacher, a friend, a daughter, and that kindness was really important to me until I was diagnosed in 2012. With a lot more time on my hands to ponder my purpose, I could really expand on themes for my life. Then I could see how well these matched with my core beliefs. If there was a natural flow, then I knew that I was headed in the right direction. If something felt forced or there was resistance, something was out of line and either didn’t belong or needed a bigger adjustment.

Here are my core themes that I am reaffirming and reminding myself of as I live with cancer:

I am important.

My needs are important and need to be put first. I don’t come last. Yes, helping others is part of my purpose, but I need to make myself a priority. It feels really good when I snuggle in a blanket and sit by the fire with a book. I enjoy putting something else aside so I can go for a nature walk. Taking a break to drink a cool glass of refreshing green juice tastes heavenly. I have rediscovered the joys of reading and writing. I have gifts to share through teaching, writing, and journaling. My work is valuable.

I also need to choose activities and people who are calming, supportive, and fun. I am too important to put myself in harmful, negative, and stressful environments. There is no need to apologize or explain. No drama for me. I lived as a compromiser for too long to avoid arguments. Honestly, I thought it was easier that way. The problem was that the compromises, or all out giving in, was not calming, supportive to me, or enjoyable. It isn’t selfish to put yourself first. It’s self-care.

My life still has great purpose. When I taught, I made a difference day-by-day, child-by-child. Now, I approach new endeavors with that same driven ambition I had with teaching, but also with more balance since my schedule is highly flexible. What I have to say is important to share.

I am strong.

Another core theme is that I am strong and immensely powerful. No, I am not overly physically strong, but I’m getting stronger. I could never climb the rope in gym class or do a decent pull-up. Those are claims to fame that still elude me. But I have enough inner strength to match a hundred rope climbs and thousands of pull-ups. That’s right, thousands. I had the power to get a classroom singing to original lyrics and choreographed movements about respect for an assembly, AND I was able to get them to think it was cool because it was cool. I have the power to advocate for my best health and make it the best it can be.

I will exercise and eat well to feel better and give my body what I need to be healthy. Health doesn’t happen with just one or the other. Eventually, poor eating choices catch up with a person even if he or she is fit. Great eating choices don’t do a lot if someone never moves or exercises. There also is an emotional payout to exercising and eating well. I get my thirty-minute minimum every day.

I’ve had to dig my heels in a lot more over the past seven years, particularly in terms of what I will accept in terms of how I’m treated. As examples, I was not happy with past phone conversations and what I considered bullying from a long-term disability company that did everything in its power but help me. I spoke up, but it’s a long story and a subject for another post. I’ve also called the patient relations department a few times where I receive treatment over the repeated delays and long waits patients have in receiving treatments because of financial decisions rather than decisions focused on patient care. Here again, it’s a subject for another post. The take away is I’ve become strong enough to speak up for myself when my needs aren’t being met or someone has been rude.

I connect with nature.

I need nature. I love healing green spaces with lots of trees. I absorb the energy. Two summers ago on a short vacation, I observed this first hand. I had traveled with my sister to Door County on Wisconsin’s peninsula. I usually am ready sooner than she is in the morning. I would get a little droopy and sluggish waiting for her before we started our day. My energy level completely changed by simply driving through one of the state parks as a detour connecting one town to the next. The woods provided a combination of nature, peace, energy, healing, and spirit for me all in one. My mood shifted for the better.

I experience the same feeling wash over me whenever I drive into the UW- Arboretum. My mind unwinds as I meander along the paths. It’s the green, all the trees, and being in a place where any humans I meet are there for the same thing as me.

Peace and kindness are recurring themes.

I am all about peace and kindness. In 2013, I finally started a peace journal, made up of Bible passages, ideas from other religions on peace, poetry lines, famous quotes, songs, and anything about peace that resonated with me. When I quiet the house and everything around me, everything narrows down to particular words and thoughts. Then everything opens up big time. It’s pure meditation and oxytocin in action. My spirit soars and I feel like I leave or that I’m lost in the moment. Maybe I’m actually more present than ever. I believe a lot of people pray for peace, which is more important now than ever in today’s world. I read a distinction someone made not too long ago that if people prayed, meditated, or just thought (whatever you want to call it) to feel peace rather than for peace, it would be possible to achieve lasting peace between people in the world. We need to feel it within first and push it outward.

I am a teacher and a learner.

A core theme as a teacher and learner has been central to my life. I loved elementary school. I did well. Reading and immersing myself in a world of story couldn’t be beat. From as long as I can remember, I always loved learning and sharing what I learned. Whether a student or teacher, school was a place where I felt safe, successful, and supported. It’s what I wanted to give my students. Teaching always just fit who I was. I can’t explain it any other way. Sometimes I entertain thoughts of returning to school for courses in writing, history, archaeology, and literature just for fun. For now, I enjoy exploring what interests me on my own.

It is no coincidence that in work with my fitness coach I am focused on a lot of work to strengthen my physical core. I know what is at the center of my personal core. I have rock-solid personal core themes and know who I am. In this sense, I am very well aligned.

Happiness involves living in accordance with your core themes. What you identify at your core should be those things that bring you happiness, enjoyment, and peace. Associated words for these feelings may be energetic, hopeful, valued, proud, loving, joyful, and thankful. You may reconsider your actions if you associate feelings of guilt, boredom, frustration, anxiety, helplessness, discouragement, and anger with them. It seems obvious, yet many people stick with actions or beliefs that go against their core out of habit and because making a change is hard work. Make little changes. In a few months time, a small shift has happened where you feel more like you.

We all deserve to be our best.

Consider responding:

  • What’s at your core?
  • Where/when do you feel most like YOU?

Exercise and Nutrition

A quote from the 2014 documentary Fed Up concisely sums up how diet and exercise must be thought of as partners in health: “You can’t diet your way out of a sedentary lifestyle. You can’t exercise your way out of a bad diet.”

It seems likely that someone who watches what they eat probably also has an active lifestyle. Eating right and moving around just helps you feel better and fuels your fun. Raw or steamed broccoli is better than a bag of chemical chips. Taking a walk around the pond is better than sitting on my duff watching TV or even, ahem, blogging.

Exercise

I am not athletic. Attempts at running were always short-lived and caused me minor injury in the past. But I love to walk outdoors. Going to the UW-Arboretum or Pheasant Branch Conservancy takes care of my heart, lets me decompress, and promotes creativity. Once I build up a little endurance, I also enjoy biking. Gardening, yard work, mowing the lawn, shoveling snow, and anything functional in the line of caring for my home all count and provide that undeniable feeling of self-satisfaction.

Moving needs to become second nature. My Fitbit has helped me monitor how much I move (or don’t move) on a daily basis. Before that, I wrote down how many miles I walked in a journal. It’s important to find a way to be accountable. A while back I read that making goals wasn’t enough, but a person needed to take goals a step further and make plans. Wanting to walk more is all very nice. Scheduling to walk in the arboretum helps turn the very nice into a reality. Saying I’m going to bike more means nothing if I don’t make sure my bike is ready to go and I make the effort to do it.

Hiking is one of my favorite activities. Hiking gets me out in nature with fresh air, blue sky, and lots of trees. Getting lost in my thoughts and really giving myself time to think away from other distractions always provides me with new insight. There is something amazing that happens in my brain when I pair physical and mental work together. My brain works better and thoughts are clearer. Physically, hiking has a long list of health benefits including improved cardio and muscular fitness, lowering risks of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and triglycerides, and also lowering risks of cancers like colon and breast cancer. It’s a great aerobic workout. Hiking also can provide better sleep quality, reduce depression, and lower your risk of an early death. Being active in general tends to lower the risk of death. Honestly. How not surprising. Psychologically, hiking can provide feelings of relaxation and well-being. Sunshine, fresh air, trees, and feelings of accomplishment all feed into better mental health.

Exercise is important for everyone, but keeping it as part of a daily routine is one of my priorities as someone trying to live well with cancer. There definitely are times I would rather sit through a dental cleaning or a foreign film without subtitles than exercise. When I’m already feeling fatigued as a side effect from treatment, it seems crazy to purposely choose to do something that will make me feel more tired. Strangely though, this is not the case. Exercise combats fatigue. I feel tired after exercising, but it’s a different kind of tired than fatigue. I have more energy after I recover from however I’ve chosen to exercise. The energy sticks around a while. Regular exercise has also been connected to increasing survival rates for women with breast cancer. I want to stay alive, hence I exercise every day.

What about when fatigue isn’t the problem? What if it’s physical pain that’s preventing movement? I experienced this the other weekend with aggravated inflammation and muscle soreness from an injection that caused deep hurt with every step. I fought through most of that day trying to find a way to keep fun plans I had that night to go to a concert. I missed my daily workout because I couldn’t exercise through the pain. I could barely walk. I don’t think exercising when you hurt is a safe idea. Pain is a solid stop sign. The up side to my story is I was prescribed some strong medication to help make my evening of fun possible. I still hurt but there were moments I forgot. The down side is the meds made me puke profusely by the next evening. It took days before I moved well again. I’m not pushing activity and I’m definitely not taking any more of those pills. My body will let me know what I can do.

How much exercise does a person need daily? The current guidelines from the Department of Health and Human Services recommend that healthy adults get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic exercise (activity that produces a sweat). That’s a mere twenty-two minutes a day when broken down daily. Strength training is suggested at least two times a week. Click here for a short article provided by Mayo Clinic on these recommendations.

Nutrition

After getting through six months of initial chemotherapy in 2012, I needed to make changes in my diet. It’s still hard because of my love affair with sugar. Ideally, I should probably also be a vegetarian, but I love cheeseburgers too much. I try to keep these in check and enjoy them when I eat them. For me, a healthy diet consists of less meat, less processed foods, no alcohol, less sugar, more plant-based proteins, and more fish. More of a plant-based diet in general is a healthy winner. I order a steak about once a year on vacation, but even that is waning because of how I feel after eating it. I eat a lot of fish. My breakfast used to be a fairly tasty blend of five fruits and vegetables in my Nutri-bullet. What I thought was extremely healthy was also providing far too many natural sugars and unknowingly raising my A1C. Now I’ve switched to breakfasts that usually consist of eggs, half an avocado, and one fruit. The avocado cuts the natural sugar from the fruit.

One area in nutrition I’ve been more successful in is eliminating dairy. I miss milk. I love milk. However, it contains casein, a protein that promotes cancer growth in any stage. I know some who have read widely on this and disagree on whether that is true or not. My current feeling is I really don’t have much wiggle room to disagree. It is potentially more beneficial to me to avoid milk than to drink it. There is no dietary reason to consume milk produced by another animal. Calcium can come from plant-based proteins such as quinoa, brown rice, oatmeal, white beans, kale, and collard greens. With all that said, I still will enjoy ice cream now and again, maybe a little more than I should. I like string cheese. I slip every so often and have cereal with milk. It tastes awesome, but it can’t become regular diet. I grew up and live in Wisconsin, also known as The Dairy State. Clearly, there is room for improvement in cutting out more foods made with milk. Did I mention I really love ice cream?

I have also added an Omega low-speed, masticating juicer to extract all the vitamins, enzymes, and minerals in their purest and rawest form to provide the highest juice yield. Kale, spinach, celery, cucumber, and green apples make the most gorgeous green juice I’ve ever seen, and it’s also very refreshing. The color green is both a healing and energizing color. Green juice is a great way to send oxygen and needed nutrition to unhealthy cells. Unhealthy cells don’t like oxygen. Too bad, I’m very fond of oxygen. I get to choose, not the other way around.

Both exercise and nutrition need to work in tandem together to get the best results. I am a firm believer that everyone can do something. One person’s exercise or nutritional needs are different from what someone else needs. For example, most people are supposed to get what vitamins and minerals they need from eating a healthy diet and not need these in supplement form. I take a lot of supplements because treatments make it harder for my body to absorb some things. I also still feel a bit down when I look at people hitting the pavement or trails on their bike who look like they are practically flying. I have to work hard to achieve even a slow speed. It takes time for me to build any true endurance. I do the best I can.

Click here to read the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines provided by Mayo Clinic. I don’t agree with all the recommendations, but it does force me to justify my choices. As I mentioned in an earlier post, sometimes I feel like there is so much conflicting information on what healthy nutrition means that it’s hard not to drive myself nuts. I look for overlapping ideas from multiple sources.

I try to make the right choices for me in how I move and what I put into my body. I can’t just do one or the other to be healthy. I can’t compare my needs to anyone else’s either. Everyone has individual preferences, routines, and needs. I do learn a lot from others who share what they know when I ask for their wisdom.

My hope is that we all find a way to eat well and move well.

Consider responding:

  • What are some of your favorite healthy foods?
  • How do you enjoy moving?

Trust Your Gut

There is wisdom in the old adage to trust your gut. It tells us when something is off – be it a person, situation, or our bodies. It has been quipped as our second brain and more and more people believe the gut plays a role in our emotional health. I think it’s wise to listen to your gut. I dealt with IBS symptoms for years prior to a cancer diagnosis. Forgive me if I share too much. True, there were trigger foods and emotional triggers that caused issues. I saw many specialists that only ruled things out and never could explain why my stomach and digestion were such a mess. Other than a colonoscopy to rule out colon cancer, no one ever thought cancer was truly at the root. And it may not have been, but my gut was certainly working hard to tell me something was wrong. I made minor changes to my diet, but wound up just trying to control symptoms since I never got a real explanation.

Interestingly, after the diagnosis, the IBS symptoms all but disappeared. Sure, my diet is much different now, but I find it a very interesting correlation. Trust your gut. Perhaps it’s bringing your attention to something physical or emotional. Listen.

I am not a dietician, a nutritionist, or a health coach. I just want to share a few things I’ve learned over the past few years. Please follow-up with research of your own and consulting health professionals before making changes to your diet.

Eating a plant-based diet is one of the easiest ways to naturally change your gut environment. Many fruits, vegetables, and whole grains contain prebiotics that keep the large intestine happy. Plants that are higher in fiber content help the gut. It has something to do with the fructans found in fiber rich foods. Fructans are a type of prebiotic. The higher the fructan level, the happier your gut biome. Fresh, whole foods are the recipe for a healthy gut biome. If you choose fresh fruits, veggies, legumes, beans (pinto, kidney, white), and whole grains, you’ll have it covered. Artichokes, raspberries, and asparagus are also good sources.

Legumes typically are low in fat, have no cholesterol, and contain insoluble and soluble fiber. They are high in potassium, iron, magnesium, and folate. General foods in the legume family are lentils, chickpeas, beans, soybeans, and peanuts. Your gut likes legumes. I personally steer clear of soybeans and therefore any soy products due to associations with estrogen production, but I leave it to individuals to research and make their own decisions regarding soy, beans, and any of the suggestions I may make. What’s right for me may not be right for you. It’s always possible I have misread a fact even though I’ve made every effort to double and triple check.

Beans confuse me. Mark Hyman is the author of Food – What the Heck Should I Eat. He believes beans have benefits, mainly as resistant starches. He says the fiber, minerals, proteins, and other nutrients found in beans can be gotten from other food sources. He also writes that beans are to be avoided if you have cancer. I’m left confused here. There are always conflicting statistics, studies, and recommendations about foods. As stated above, beans can help contribute to a healthy gut. There are times I feel that I’m doomed whatever I eat. I still don’t know what the heck I should eat. Then I slip and have a delicious bowl of ice cream.

Broccoli probably wins the prize for the most beneficial food ever grown. I can’t stand it, but I’ve eaten it diligently. Now, I’m on a bit of a broccoli break. It’s easy enough and you can’t beat all its benefits. It’s just one of the mighty cruciferous vegetables that decrease the risk of several types of cancers (breast, colon, melanoma, pancreatic, and liver) and improves bone health. Cauliflower, kale, turnips, and Brussels sprouts are other cruciferous winners.

I have a lot to learn about whole grains. For those in the gluten-free camp, grains aren’t for you. The great thing about whole grains is they are packed with fiber and carbs. When these make their way to the large intestine, they are broken down there and promote the growth of beneficial bacteria.

Plants rich in polyphenols are also helpful to the gut biome because they decrease inflammation in your gut. Polyphenols actually aren’t absorbed efficiently on their way to the colon, which in this case is a good thing, because it means there are more to be digested by bacteria in your gut. Good sources of polyphenols include blueberries, grape skins, broccoli, and onions. Almonds also are a good source, as well as cocoa and dark chocolate. Finally, no guilt for all the dark chocolate I eat! Red wine and green tea are liquid sources for polyphenols.

There are lots of diets out there claiming to achieve wellness for your body – low carb, no dairy, no gluten, no sugar, no meat, vegan, high protein, high fat, etc. The list goes on and on. Some have merit. I am waiting for the high chocolate diet since dark chocolate has already been established as a very good thing.

Bottom line: Eating a diverse diet that is mostly plants, limited in processed meats, and low in sugar is one that will keep your gut happy and that keeps YOU healthy.

I worked with a naturopath in the fall of 2016. It turns out my gut ecology wasn’t helping my body absorb nutrients even though I had made many diet changes and added supplements to my daily intake. This was less than thrilling news to hear that I’d been getting little if any positive effect from years of faithfully ingesting numerous pharmaceutical grade supplements, not to mention the financial investment involved with that commitment. Apparently, chemotherapy and some medications can drain your body of certain nutrients. The solution was better gut ecology, attained through a plant protein based drink that was dark yellow, thick, and awful tasting. I called it sludge. Strangely enough, I came to count on it as a support. It gave me needed nutrition and repaired my gut. I continue to drink it from time to time since my gut will likely be in need of extra support for a long time.

Gut ecology and health is a burgeoning field of science. No matter what the ailment, it seems improving your gut biome is a place to start recovering better health. Thousands of species of microorganisms make the gut home sweet home. These microbes help maximize nutrient absorption and support digestion. They even can contribute to a better immune system. Both these functions are vital to a stronger, healthier me, so if I need to drink sludge every day, I’ll do it happily, because a body that is functioning creates an environment where cancer cells are not welcome. Healthy bacteria in your gut actually form disease fighting armies. Foods like bananas, broccoli, blueberries, beans, and fermented plant-based foods are natural ways to create this bacteria. I give my gut a boost however I can and also take probiotics.

Michael Pollan is an author and food connoisseur who has taught me a lot about healthier eating. He has three simple rules: Eat Food. Not too much. Mostly plants. For further reading, I recommend In Defense of Food (or any book by him).

Trust keeps coming up over and over again as an underlying thread in many posts. It affects how you relate to yourself, to others, and how you function in the world. Trust affects what you eat and how much you eat. Establishing healthy boundaries has a lot to do with trust. I believe there is a direct cause and effect link between happiness, health, and trust. Examining each of these is a huge topic. For now, I’ll keep it simple with a basic guideline to listen to what your gut has to say. Trust yourself. Trust your gut.

Lucky Leprechauns and Health

Many years ago, a middle-aged Irish woman started off a bus tour of Killarney and the surrounding area with these words, “When God made time, He made plenty of it.”

If you don’t hear her accent, you’re reading it wrong. Go back and reread it with a lilt that would make a leprechaun jealous. Her words still echo true twenty plus years later.

Too many of us rush around trying to get more and more done, believing that quantity is better than quality. If we could SLOW DOWN a little, we would find there is more than enough time for what truly matters – things like love, joy, learning, and truly working to make the world a better place. At the end of the day, these are the important things. If you feel like you never have enough time, you are trying to do too much. Taking care of yourself and your health may take a back seat. Important things are likely being neglected or pushed off until later. Later never comes. No one can keep doing everything all the time. We need sleep, peace, and joy.

There is plenty of time.

Make changes.

We all have the same number of minutes in a day. If working out is a priority, time opens up for it. If more time is needed to read to or play with your children, you will find it. If you sit watching hours of television or mindlessly checking various social media accounts, well, there goes your time. We all have the same amount. We all use it differently.

I could make more time to clean my home, but I don’t and I don’t care. Not a priority.

I hope I never become allergic to dust.

Slow down.

I believe it’s healthy to slow down. Slowing down lowers stress and increases happiness. How do you do that if you want to slow down a little or a lot? I’ve asked myself these questions:

What is it that I really want to make time for?
Where do I feel like I waste time every day?
How can I make my life easier?
What happens if “x” just doesn’t get done for a day or two?

My answers revealed my priorities. Too much time is wasted on various screens throughout the day. Making a list keeps me more focused. I used to find lists too controlling, but that leads me to the answer to my last question. If something doesn’t get crossed off the list or completed, I really don’t care.

Leprechauns have always struck me as happy, healthy, and lucky. I don’t know how they spend their time, other than mischief-making and making tiny boots. They know a secret the rest of us are trying to learn. The Irish woman giving the Killarney bus tour knew the secret.

Why are leprechauns so happy?

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I think it’s a combination of the whiskey, jigging, and being around so much healing green. I love all three of these, however, these days I’m limited to jigging and loving green things. No worries, I can still channel my “inner whiskey” when I need it. Don’t ask me what I mean by that because I’m not sure. I just do it. Leprechauns also are so small that joy and happiness (and maybe a little mischief) just oozes out because it has no other choice. We all need to have that leprechaun spark ignited within us.

How can we be just as lucky as leprechauns?

Some people are just thought to be luckier than others. I am really lucky at getting awesome parking spaces. But there are things to do to improve your chances. Believing you are lucky increases your chances of getting what you want. It changes your perspective. You become more receptive to opportunities around you. That has the potential to change health opportunities and outcomes. I think the same is true with time. When a person thinks there is no time – there isn’t. When a person thinks there is enough time to do something – somehow time opens up so such and such magically gets done.

I have heard that lucky people are clear on their goals and voice them. A leprechaun is very clear on his goal to hold on to his gold. No fancy or flowery language. I figure a leprechaun has two main goals:

Keep its gold.

Be a leprechaun.

How can I find my gold?

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What is my gold? My health. I need to feed it good food, fuel it with fun exercise, and surround myself with people who love me. I need to make time for what keeps me happy and healthy.

Lucky people also are proactive. They put themselves in settings where what they seek is present. They go to fundraisers to meet doctors and researchers. They go to writing conferences and send query letters to agents and publishers. They audition for plays, sing on “The Voice,” and run for public office. Lucky people talk about their interests and visions. Asking questions is a sign of being proactive because you get answers and make progress. Here I am a little stumped as to how a leprechaun making little shoes and boots all day relates to their goal of protecting their gold. Share a theory if you have one.

My grandma’s ancestors came from Ireland. She always had a twinkle in her eye and personified some of the mischief leprechauns are said to have. Grandma lived until she was 98 years old. I think she knew whatever the Irish woman from the bus tour knew.

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My grandma had more than a twinkle in her eye. She sparkled all over.

The truth of the matter is a leprechaun doesn’t need a pot of gold. He’s never using it. It seems a sign of greed for those who want to steal it. If I ever meet one, I wouldn’t ask for it because I’d be tricked out of it anyway. I wouldn’t even ask for shoes. Instead I’d ask for a bit of healing magic. They are said to be magical and covered from head to toe in green. Green is healing. Healing is golden to me.

So, what have I learned about leprechauning?

  • Green is a wonderful color.
  • Doing a jig is non-stop fun.
  • A leprechaun has plenty of time.
  • We all have plenty of time.
  • A leprechaun is lucky because it believes it’s lucky.
  • It knows what it wants and it is clear on its goals.
  • A leprechaun is proactive.
  • It doesn’t even need its pot of gold.
  • Its gold is found within and that really is what we all are after.
  • We all can be leprechauns.

It seems fitting to end with a traditional Irish blessing:

May the road rise up to meet you.

May the wind be always at your back.

May the sun shine warm upon your face.

May the rains fall soft upon your fields.

And, until we meet again,

May God hold you in

The palm of His hand.

I can’t believe I have to say this, but if you didn’t say the Irish blessing with an Irish accent, you’re still doing it wrong. Go back and do it properly.

And may you make your own luck.

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