A Piece of Fruit

A couple moved in next door to my mom’s house years after my dad died. They were older and wanted a ranch home to live in as they aged. Carolyn had mobility issues. Dave helped her transform a fairly barren backyard into beautiful areas of raised flower beds. Dave would occasionally snow blow part of my mom’s sidewalk. They looked out for her and were kind people. It’s great when neighbors can look out for each other. My city is known as the Good Neighbor City. Most of the time we wear it well.

The years go by as they do. Carolyn became confined to a wheelchair. Dave grew older and showed signs of decline here and there. My sister and her partner started looking out for them. Now they would help with the snow as Dave had once done for my mom. Good neighbor spirit at its best.

The ambulance showed up next door on a Saturday night a couple of weeks ago. After a bit of a wait, a stretcher with Dave wearing an oxygen mask was brought out. He was loaded up and the ambulance took off. Carolyn was brought out, helped into a car, and it followed after the ambulance.

By the next day, cars were parked on the street outside their home. Cars usually show up at a house after someone has died with family gathering together and showing support. My sister walked over to find out what happened and to offer her help. Dave had died.

He choked on a piece of orange.

I’m still gutted. One moment a person is eating an orange on an ordinary day. The next moment it’s lodged in his throat. He can’t breathe. He can’t communicate. His wife can’t get to him and be of help. She watched in terror which is equally as gutting. He had been without oxygen too long and there was no brain activity. The decision was made to let him go and remove him from life support.

How sudden, unfair, and without reason.

Why? It’s another unanswerable question I’ve asked myself. Maybe it was his time. Maybe this avoided a long illness on the way or a devastating accident. Maybe these are things we just tell ourselves.

Dave’s death got me thinking about life and death. People often wonder if a quick death is better or a long one. My father died quickly of an aortic aneurysm after a second heart surgery. All sorts of medical issues were identified during that surgery. He had more surgery and a long road ahead of him. My family hadn’t faced a lot of death in the family. We were naïve and thought he’d get better. He thought this, too. It wasn’t meant to be. We were shocked not to have a goodbye.

My mom survived a little longer than a year after her metastatic breast cancer diagnosis. She languished more and more in an assisted living facility for her final couple of months. More of her was lost each day. She didn’t have any wise comments about death or the afterlife. Talking about these things didn’t ease her. I remember she gave me quite the sideways glance when I once mentioned she’d see Dad again. Her mother (who had passed) came to her a couple of times to visit. She told me about that when I would drive across town to visit her after school and spend dinner with her. I wanted to know what she had to say but my mom couldn’t piece the conversation together. Another time she told me Grandma had left without saying goodbye and my mom was very distraught. All I had was comfort and love to give her. I would just sit and feed spoonfuls of soft food to her or watch her sleep until my sister would join me when she finished work.

Is a long goodbye or short goodbye better? Perhaps no goodbye at all?

We get what we get.

I believe we get what we are supposed to get.

If you are a regular reader, you know I have metastatic breast cancer. I am lucky to be here.

I would absolutely die if I died choking on a piece of fruit.

Forgive the dark humor.

Change is hard for me. None of us know when we’ll breathe our last. Some of us have a better idea than others what might cause our eventual demise. I’ve been able to think about what is important to me. I focus on meaning. I stage photographs a certain way so they can hopefully capture a moment or my spirit. I believe gifts should have meaning but I’m more into experiences. I have more than enough things. And oh, is time precious. Goodbyes are hard for me, too. I still want to have them.

But not now.

Living with metastatic disease involves living as fully as possible in the moment. I do a deep dive into connection with others. I relish times of calm and laughter. My values are more aligned with my words and actions. Living fully is where I place my attention and intentions. I think many feel the same.

There was a parent of a former student I taught who died two days after she was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. No prior symptoms. She thought she had the flu. There was no time to process the shock let alone time for her family to say goodbye. This happened some years before I was diagnosed. It was unimaginable then and still is now.

Another death that was sudden, unfair, and without reason.

Maybe we don’t get what we’re supposed to get. No one should get only two days. The shock is still present. I’ve seen her children as adults. They turned out to be great young women. Great young women who lost their mother far too soon.

Why have I been blessed with nine years post diagnosis when she got two days? The survivor guilt weighs on me like a boulder crushing my chest. I work to free myself from it, to talk about it, to grieve when I can since I can’t do anything about preventing the loss anyway. It is out of all our hands.

Life is short.

Life is fragile.

Rest in peace, Dave.

Cancer Olympics

The 2020 Summer Olympics finally have arrived a year late in 2021. Tokyo, Japan is the backdrop to host the best of the best in competition. The Tokyo Olympics will be the biggest ever consisting of 339 events and 41 different sports. The four new sports added this year are skateboarding, surfing, karate, and sport climbing.

My sister and I shared a mostly unused skateboard growing up. Our driveway was level but too steep for our blood. I’ve never surfed. I took karate for about a year to feel more confident living abroad. I had no idea what sport climbing entailed. It looks like rock wall climbing, where speed, bouldering, and lead are scored.

Bouldering is a fun word.

What did you do today? I bouldered. I went bouldering. Fun, right?

I posed the question to my sister about which Olympic sport she would do if she were competing. She chose shotput because all you had to do was turn around and throw a weight as far as you could. I chose to compete in a horse equestrian competition. I don’t know how to ride a horse, but it seemed like the physical work rested with the horse and any finesse and skill rested with the rider. Of course, there is much more involved with both sports. Neither of us is overly athletic. I am at best a beginner in the many active things I try.

I’ve enjoyed tennis throughout life. If I get to imagine my expertise in an Olympic sport, tennis would suit me very well. Badminton was a sport I was always good at. I have a lot of fun memories with badminton.

I segued these thoughts into pondering about cancer. If there were a Cancer Olympics, what would it entail?

We have our sprints where we want to get through something as quickly as possible. Maybe it’s a bout with nausea. Maybe it’s intense muscle, joint, or bone pain. Or scans we repeat every few months. It’s safe to say we want to push through cancery things as quickly as possible and get back to living our lives.

Hurdles are high and constant. Scheduling and rescheduling hurdles. Insurance obstacles. Pharmacy barriers in our path. Lab numbers that must be met to qualify for a race. Cancer in general has many hurdles. They are endless if you have a metastatic diagnosis.

Cancer havers run marathons to keep going. Long hauls are measured in time and difficulty. Stamina is an important part of fitness. On the last night of a recent Door County vacation, my sister told me I had stamina. It was a huge compliment. And I believe it to have been true on our trip. I knew I’d have to be prepared to be on the go all day. I conserved energy where and when I could. I ignored how badly neuropathy was aggravating my feet. I plastered on the smile and didn’t complain. I surprised myself how well I did on the trip.

We do gymnastics balancing on a cancer beam as we gracefully walk, leap, and flip along. How do we do it? It looks effortless. We don’t look sick at all! We’re fine, just fine.

Other sports like weightlifting and boxing lend themselves well to cancer Olympics. Remember just because we carry something well doesn’t make it easy. Getting knocked down and always getting back up one more time is exhausting, especially when you don’t know what’s next. Stamina comes into play again.

Research is a team sport like volleyball, basketball, or relay races. I’d like research to work more in tandem with one another when possible. I feel some trials could be carried out across the country and apply to a wider section of people, hence making results and outcomes even stronger. Let’s work together as a team.

Well, I wondered what others thought about the idea of a Cancer Olympics. I asked for input on Twitter and received more answers than I had hoped for. Some cancer havers responded seriously, some added humor, some touched on similar themes and other replies stood out on their own. I’ve made attribution to individuals unless they asked for anonymity.

Question: In what “sport” do you deserve a gold medal?

Treatment and Side Effects

Janice (@JaniceTNBCmets) Gold medal in mTNBC treatment response and duration, although I can’t take credit for it, no skill involved other than enduring toxic chemotherapy & radiation burns. All credit goes to science & pure luck!

Lori (@lori_burwell) Planes, trains, and automobiles. Most transportation ridden to get clinical trial treatment for 2 yrs between my home and NYC.

Anonymous comment: IV pole dancing.

Jill (@missjillo) Waiting. Waiting for results. For tests. For surgeries. For checkups. For appointments. For everything.

Melissa (@rissiekins) Taken over 5000 pills since diagnosis!!

@_BetsyKate Most beanies, hats, scarves and wigs. (I only ever wear the beanies though!)

Sonya (@sonyagoins1) Gold medal in dancing through breast cancer treatments (chemo, double mastectomy, radiation and ongoing chemo). I’m going on a year and still making moves.

Vicky (@VickyStanton09) Gold in steroid induced insomnia over here.

@ThebigCteacher Changing my PICC line dressing with just one hand. They say practise makes perfect, I’ve had plenty of practise!

@brembles Number of failed port sticks. The day before I was released from my stem cell transplant, three different nurses tried and failed to access my port 8 TIMES. I was already incredibly squeamish about the whole process.

Alexander (@AlexanderVancel) 9 months with a partial bowel obstruction, which required a PEG tube the entire time. I couldn’t eat food, I survived on liquid IV nutrition. Yes, it hurt. A lot.

(@thesaltiestcow) Radiation induced cancer 30 years after radiotherapy for teenage bone cancer. Late effects!

Olivia (@lamLIVJames) Gold medal in chemo brain! I have an official diagnosis of Major Cognitive Impairment from multiple sources (chemo, chemical-induced menopause, anesthetic, hormone blockers, and trauma related to multiple medical errors during treatment. I’m permanently disabled (from age 46).

Noel (@AdvocateRoma) Changing careers twice to stay off disability and remain employed when neuropathy and lymphedema prevent me from continuing successfully in my original field.

Multiple Golds

Kristie (@kkbadger1) My gold medal would be earned in port surgeries. I had FIVE between February and April of 2021 to take out and replace a port. Two more if I include the original surgeries in 2012. I’ve had 12 lines of treatment.

Flori (@CANsurvive) Best Her2+ Breast Cancer-grower. 25 years and still growing new crops with no GMOs. Most body parts relocated to “breasts” (5!). Longest Infusion times for Herceptin: 6hrs 24min. Most Annoying Patient. World Class user of the word FUCK while having Brain MRI.

Silke (@Silke4senate) Recovering my stamina: knocked by lesion pressing on sciatic nerve. Recovered. Knocked by Ibrance. Recovered. Knocked by Piqray. Recovered. Knocked by Xeloda heart attack. Recovered. Knocked out by meniscus surgery. Still recovering. Knocked by bone pain. Hoping to recover.

Ilene (@ilenealizah) Longest plastered on smile, Number of words typed into a text message to explain my condition to a “Normie”, Most losses of family members since diagnosis (same might go for friends), Best economic finagling to get copays and healthcare paid for.

Liz (@lizard817) Not sure I belong on this list just 2.5 yrs MBC. Still on ibrance 125 level. Maybe the number of cancer fractures – all over, all ribs etc… The oncologist 1st PETScan read didn’t use medical terms -“all your bones are mashed, crushed” -teased him about his lack of medical terms.

Linda (@HLindaMahler) I’d be happy for an Olympic medal for “Living with MBC while also sole caregiver of my husband who has Alzheimer’s.” Almost no one asks how I’m doing because his decline is more obvious and I look “fine.”

Gerda (@LoboGerda) I win for recurrences, ya bunch of losers!!!

Big Mama (@BigMama22941275) I don’t need a medal, I’m already a champion. I have won my battles so far, with a huge one ahead. I will not lay down my sword . . . I have a battle to win, even if it’s with my own life . . . I will win.

Patty (@Pattybeatslungc) Perservance, Hope, Faith, Joy

Cancer Centers, Advocacy, Doctors, Scans, and More

@CannotReality I deserve a gold medal for being able to schedule appointments with my oncologist, hematologist, and lab all on the same day. Two of which are in different towns.

Dee (@womenofteal) A medal in reading gyn cancer research journal articles and clinical trial protocols.

@ThanksCancer I deserve a gold in cancer overthinking!

Jessica (@jessicaestes) My 9 year old can sit completely still as a needle comes at her – both her arm for labs and her chest for chemo through the port.

Amber (@tinybuddhamom) Sparring with Doctors.

Nancy (@Nancy_Deol) I would gold medal in constant cancer news reading (Feedly) and hyper vigilance. Or maybe hyper vigilance covers it all.

Chris (@gotthegistofit) Timing my breathing/holding my breath for MRI scans. I’ve got it down to split second perfection.

Diarrhea Dash and Related Races

Rafael (@rafaelmarquez) 15 yard waddle to the bathroom with zero leaks.

Donalyn (@cpddmack) Likely lots of contenders for medal in the pertuzumab dash (with chemo induced anemia – an extra special feat!) and the neratinib dash.

Hilary (@sbl365) Sphincter gold medalist right here.

@MalignantM Fastest time to the toilet.

Family Gold and Other Relationships

Kelly (@stage4kelly) Gold medal in eye rolling at all the people who tell me I’ll beat cancer. Gold medal in making cancer muggles uncomfortable with my chirpy “not dead yet!” answer to “how are you” (with sad eye head tilt).

@FollowHeidi Parenting toddlers and working full time while going through chemo. Also; pregnant at the same time.

Addie (@AddieDvorak) Watch and Wait gold medalist son over here.

Amy (@AmyDemilt) Gold in making everyone else feel better. Saying “I’m fine” and that makes them feel good. Gold for family that doesn’t talk about anything important, especially illness.

Tabby (@tabbypotter) Winner of pretending it’s all ok when most my family on both sides pretends it doesn’t exist.

Chris (@ChrisinMass) My brother’s profanity . . . he would be for sure a gold medalist.

Faking It

Michael (@bodagetta) Pretending I’m ok when I’m really not.

@LBSamuelsson I might be the “I’m fine” gold medalist.

Tracey (@GrinterTracey) Uncurling my fist, instead of putting it in someone’s face, when they say “but you look really well.”

Elizabeth (@ElizCLT) Managing strangers’ feelings.

There is so much involved in Cancer Olympics. Kristina (@kristinabaum) commented she kind of wished there was a Survivor Olympics. She lists on her profile she is a distance runner and a triathlete. Best wishes to Kristina in her competitions. I get the feeling she could kick ass in any competition she enters. I wish I had that athleticism. (This is a good time to picture me trying to clear a hurdle.) I can’t speak for Kristina, but my feeling was she wanted the opportunity to prove that a person can come back stronger or just as strong as before diagnosis and completed treatment.

I get it.

But there are too many survivors, too many who have died, and too many who are living with metastatic cancer. We ALL deserve gold if we have heard those chilling words, “You have cancer.” We could fill Ft. Knox. Fund a cure. Not have a Cancer Olympics.

Terri (@6state) had a similar comment about affirming what her body could achieve after cancer. Rowing is her sport where she’d medal as she did it in college. She wrote she now rows at the gym to maintain her health after 6 surgeries, chemo, and radiation. I love that she acknowledged how I often feel when I exercise or have to prove to myself I can do something. She wrote rowing “gives me affirmation after that assault, my body didn’t betray me.” Terri does not have metastatic disease. I unfortunately do. In the metastatic world, my body betrays me a lot, and yet I’m lucky I still have it.

Robin McGee (@TCOrobin) has written an award winning book titled The Cancer Olympics. I may have to check it out. The cover features a photo of those continuous hurdles. Tony Collier (@ethansgrumps) blogs about living with prostate cancer. He replied his gold medal would be in perseverance. Thanks to both Robin and Tony for sharing their related work.

Endurance and stamina come through in all the responses. Somehow, we keep getting through unimaginable things where all our training is in the moment with new situations. I am grateful to everyone who shared their thoughts and part of their cancer experience. I am touched by your honesty and still laugh at those touches of humor.

Thank you.

We are all gold medal winners.

Anchor Moments

Anchors offer security, safety, and control. They keep a boat from floating aimlessly and becoming lost. It’s like a bookmark is to books. Or glue holding a craft together. All these hold something in place.

An anchor chart supports learning in the classroom. It is meant to serve as a reference and move students towards success. In my teaching practice, I had some reading and writing anchor charts that would come out for specific units, whereas others might live in classroom year-round as a permanent anchor. I have been retired for five years now. I no longer have any of my large size anchor charts that I made. Here are some of a friend and former colleague. You can check out more of her work at The Interactive Teacher.

I’ve thought about anchors lately as I continue to go through treatment for metastatic breast cancer. No, I have not made one for cancer. I’m tempted. It would lend itself well to words, visuals, webs, and charts, but I don’t know what point it would serve. I see all of it in my mind; I don’t need an anchor chart.

This is a chart on conversation starters I used. It’s from the Lucy Calkins’ Reading Units of Study.

I could see an anchor chart on conversation stoppers. Here are some examples:

• I’m not going to _________. (discuss that with you, go out for dinner, jeopardize my health)

• Thank you for asking. I don’t feel like talking about it.

• That’s none of your business. Let’s talk about something else.

• I need to ___________ right now. (rest, sit down, catch my breath, nap, hydrate, eat, be alone)

• No. (Covers a wide range of responses.)

• Blank stare. (Also covers a wide range of responses.)

Perhaps a chart of potential treatments or trials I haven’t had yet and pertinent details could be useful. Very useful. The illusion of organization amongst my chaotic cancer life would be welcome. But I don’t want to stare at it 24/7.

Anchor moments were birthed from what I know about anchor charts. These anchor moments would serve as a reference to move me back to hope when I’m feeling depressed, disappointed, or frustrated about how I’m feeling or bad news. A person doesn’t need to have cancer or an illness to benefit from anchor moments. We all have favorite times we remember when we felt happy. In a nutshell, anchor moments equal favorite moments.

Here are a few of my anchor moments:

• Christmas morning as a child with my family

• Rare times when it was just Gram and me

• Bedtime songs that Dad would sing nightly

• Snuggling with my childhood dog

• Standing atop Arthur’s Seat the first time I climbed it and overlooking Edinburgh

• Memories from reading and writing workshop

• Walking in my favorite part of the arboretum no matter the season

• Waking up slowly in that time between sleep and awake feeling well rested

• Laying my head on my pillow at night and counting the day’s blessings

• Lots of Door County vacations with Mom

• Sitting in a lavender field

• Favorite photos of flowers like pink zinnia, champagne rose

• Feeling accomplished running a 5K and reaching my fundraising goal

• Sledding on a beautiful winter day as a 50 year old

• Sedona moments looking up at the red rocks or enjoying Oak Creek

• Making my sister laugh

• Special times with friends

• Enjoying ice cream or a super good chocolate chip cookie

• Time pondering life’s important questions like: What is the best dessert?

My anchor moments take me away, if only briefly. I need to live in the present. There are plenty horrid memories that creep into my now. I can allow myself to bring up happier times. Favorite times remind me of what helps me feel good. They connect me to somewhere safe, happy, and hopeful. Some moments are anchored to my time before cancer. Some are when I have cancer. Cancer is my reality, so I need to identify favorite moments that exist now, too.

Our memories are based on our experiences. I want to have as many fulfilling experiences as I can. These experiences don’t have to be monumental. Sometimes the smaller events carry a bigger meaning than huge ones. My list above goes on and on. I can bring up the anchor moment I need to fit wherever I find myself struggling.

This past weekend I spent time up north in a beautiful area called Door County. It’s located on Wisconsin’s penninsula where Green Bay and Lake Michigan surround it. Most of the towns along the water have marinas filled with speedboats, simple fishing boats, sailboats, and some small yacht vessels. Being on the water is big up there. Looking at the boats anchored on the water reminded me a lot about life. We dock when we need to come ashore. We drop anchor when we want to stop and savor the moment. We sail on when we are ready.

Sailboats anchored off the town Fish Creek.

I’d love to hear what you consider anchor moments.

Off Roading

When I went off roading in Sedona, I went for a rugged adventure. I wanted to experience something new I hadn’t done before. It was an opportunity to see things that I would be unable to see on my own. I had no idea that there would be a cancer connection.

Off roading and cancer were two things that were simply too far apart to be connected.

I didn’t think about cancer at all on my Pink Jeep Tour. Bouncing around as the jeep hit every bump and rock possible while taking in all the scenery was all I could manage. Distractions from metastatic breast cancer are rare for me. The connections between the two hit me after I returned home.

Off roading is quite a metaphor for cancer.

Both take you off the main road you found yourself on that was a smooth and comfortable ride.  Suddenly, the smooth paved road has disappeared. The navigation system doesn’t work. No signs mark the way to tell you where you are. It is unknown territory. To maneuver on this terrain takes skill. The big difference is off roading is fun and cancer is not.

Some refer to cancer as a bump in the road. This may be a fitting description for early stage cancer where treatment is successful and cancer doesn’t return. Metastatic cancer is an unpaved road made of mainly rocks that cause THOUSANDS of bumps. They appear as soon as the road changes from asphalt to dirt and rocks. One jolt is met with another, and then another, followed by countless more. They come rapidly like bullets out of a gun.

There was even a highlight of the tour that was called the staircase of no return where the jeep lurched and jerked down a slope made of rocks that resembled a staircase. Those of us with metastatic disease travel these bumps. We passed the point of no return when we were diagnosed.

The guide described the tour being like a roller coaster. A roller coaster fits my life, too. Up, down, upside down, lightning speed, and filled with twists and turns. Metastatic cancer is like a runaway rollercoaster in the mountains filled with precarious dangers like cliffs, avalanches, and a vicious wild animal or two. You can’t get off it. The topsy-turvy ride is over if you do.

He went on to share with the group how he was trained. It appeared like he was driving with no plan over the course of our 3-hour tour. However, part of his training was to make sure the tires hit exact markers to keep everyone safe. I’ve connected this to precision medicine and targeted treatments. His comments have also made me think about how my decisions matter. Like those tire tracks, I have to make sure I hit things at exactly the right angles at the right moment. And I have no control. I can’t control what my oncologist will say, or test results, or research. I’m trying to drive my own off-road vehicle without training. I’m self-taught and feel I have a certain level of expertise, but man, I wish I knew how to be a better driver on this bumpy road.

The tour was remarkable in the unparalleled beauty it revealed and what it taught me about life that has nothing to do with cancer. Maybe it does.

I was reminded what it felt like to feel free.

To celebrate life.

To continue to find meaning.

I rediscovered how important it is to know my worth. I am worth a lot. Confidence was gained every day I hiked. I began my vacation being unsure about my steps and gradually I found myself more decisive on where I placed my foot. I made very tiny leaps from one rock to another. Reminders to live in the moment and live fully are welcome.

I want to share one final thought on the agave plant. It has nothing to do with tequila. The agave has a life span of 20-25 years and it blooms only once in its life. It sprouts a tall stalk over 6 feet that resembles an asparagus stalk when it is near the end of its life. This can grow 3 to 8 inches a day when it gets ready to bloom. The blossoms are yellow and then they turn red. They bloom and the plant is said to be most beautiful at the end of its life. I find that deeply sad. The rest of our group seemed to find it oddly beautiful. I refuse to draw parallels to human life, to my life. It doesn’t make sense to me that something that has taken so long to shine only lasts a few days.

And yet I can’t help it. Since I look for meaning in things, I wonder what I am meant to know from the agave. A lot of goodness, joy, and success has come my way over the past couple of years. I’ve always been a late bloomer. Is this it?

No, I am not an agave plant. I’ve bloomed more than once.

Beauty blooms and thrives in inhospitable conditions. It can sprout up from cracks in rocks, tolerate insufferable heat, and grow without rain. I can relate. I stay alive even with cancer. I shall continue to bloom like a rare rose, a wildflower, or even a desert cactus.

The off roading adventure was beyond bumpy. It was also healing. I saw scenery I would have no other way of seeing. I discovered an uncrowded spot to watch the sunset that was easily accessible. It was healing by going and getting away from my life here. Sadly, the vortexes did not have the healing power I hoped. Maybe I’m a fool for hoping they would. Stranger things have happened. Inexplicable natural phenomenon rests solidly in that category. So many cancer things don’t make sense to me anyway.

I’ll take every bit of hope I can get on this bumpy road.

B Positive

B Positive is a CBS sit-com about a therapist who needs a kidney donor and is looking for a match. He can’t find one within his family to match his B-positive blood type. A woman he once knew offers him one of hers and is a match. The series gives a glimpse into the life of someone waiting for a transplant while still portraying someone living a normal and crazy life. The show brings visibility to hard things through humor.

Could a similar comedy work with metastatic breast cancer as the sometimes background/sometimes foreground subject matter? I’ve learned things about transplants that I didn’t know before I started watching B Positive. It’s been an educational tool like I imagine a breast cancer “comedy” being. Comedy isn’t the right word because there’s nothing funny about any cancer. I don’t know what the right words would be.

A serious comedy?

I know I’ve had my moments where I’ve come home from an oncology appointment with some doubt that it was me in the exam room. Once I asked an oncologist to look harder at one of my nipples. Honestly, who does that? A closer look was taken. All was fine. Another time I had an enlightening conversation about discomfort “down there,” my vagina, and vaginal dryness. I assured him I didn’t want him to check it out. He thought for a moment and shot back about how estrogen deprived I was. Suddenly, it all made perfect sense. We moved back to discussing the upper half of my body. I daresay these visits are comedy gold packed with meaningful content.

Uncomfortable humor is always hilarious to people not experiencing it.

What other meaningful content could be balanced with comedy? Here are a few ideas:

• Diagnosis

• Hope

• Fear

•  Pinkwashing

• October (We Are Aware) Awareness Month

• Identity

• Comments

• Clinical Trials

• Research

• Chemotherapy

• Hair

• Side Effects

• Battling, Fighting, Losing the Battle/Fight

• Scanxiety

• Life

• Success

• Family and Friend Issues

• Loss

• Day-to-Day Life

• Working and Treatment

• Relationships

• Positivity

• Early and Late Stage Perspectives

• Kale

Death of course would need to be addressed. I don’t think death is funny so I’m not including it in the list to balance with comedy.

I don’t know how any of this would work.

I don’t know if it could work.

Viewers could get a glimpse into MBC. Would it be hard? Yes. Would it be done correctly? I have no idea. It bothers me enough now when commercials for medication intended for thrivers are shown and no one is wearing a bandana or having any difficulty at all. Other characters on TV or in books don’t meet my expectations either. They either die such a painful death that another character is affected more, or they are portrayed as achieving goals that are pretty unreasonable.

What would this amazing show be called? Comments about breasts that are off the cuff or meant to be cute, funny, or sexy are instead incredibly offensive. Breasts and boobs should be removed from the title. Nor should the title be scary. It is a comedy even if it contains serious subject matter. One of my friends calls herself Meta Martha. A title like this would be short, sweet, and to the point. I’m already using it as a working title. Or perhaps just Mets. It could be mistaken as a sports show and pull in more male viewers.

B Positive is a title that carries two meanings. There is the reference to the main character Drew’s blood type of B+ that he needs to match for a successful kidney transplant. The other meaning is to be positive with whatever life throws at you. I’m on board with positivity (usually). Positivity is a feel good energy. Positive people attract like-minded individuals with similar energy. I feel better when I am positive. I am often described as positive. All good.

And yet, it takes more than “being positive” to “beat” metastatic breast cancer. Someone I hadn’t seen in years told me of someone she knew who had Stage IV cancer and now didn’t have it anymore. She was treated at Carbone as I am and had chosen western medicine to treat the cancer. Skeptical, I asked for her to share a bit more about this woman’s story. Positivity was the instant answer. Positivity cured her. It certainly could have helped, however, it isn’t measurable. It is better than negativity. I figured there was more to this story but didn’t ask. I changed the subject. Later, this friend also shared her daughter (whom I taught) cried when she heard I got sick years ago. She asked about my support network and offered help with meals, driving, or whatever. Both were unexpected comments that touched me. Empathy and kindness may need to replace the be positive slogan.

Hospitals promote programs and research while treating cancer. Reputable foundations and charities don’t get the exposure they deserve. News stories are often missing important information. Celebrity deaths bring temporary attention. Celebrity survivors don’t help much. They beat it after all. All of these combined haven’t brought information and a sense of urgency to people who aren’t affected personally. If you haven’t been personally affected, the cause isn’t as urgent.

TV shows have nationwide exposure and massive audiences.

Metastatic breast cancer needs that kind of exposure.

Maybe I need to write a pilot.

Martha, what do you think?

Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire

I was an honest person until diagnosed with cancer. It was my private business. Business that would become public when I needed to take off time from teaching. People would know when they’d see me going about life wearing a wrap on my head when bald. I chose to keep my Stage IV de novo diagnosis quiet for years as it was my choice. Only a few close friends knew, and my mother and sister, along with to whomever they may have blabbed. Why? I wanted to work and be assessed like everyone else. I didn’t want to appear limited. I didn’t need others taking up the slack for me. I certainly didn’t need pity, whispers, or in-my-face questions. One dear friend suggested I would have had even more support and seen more truly good people in my life if I shared from the start. She is probably right.

I chose to lie.

I’ve had lots of practice over the years. I lie easily and I’m a good liar. I’ve done it when I don’t want to talk about cancer and myself. Chances are I’ve lied to you at some point. If you’re nosey and intrusive, I’m not sorry. If you’re my friend, I am sorry. The truth is painful for me and I need to decide what I want to share about myself and when.

I can honestly tell you I will do it again.

I’ve held some medication back when hospitalized a few years ago because I knew they (nurses because of hospital rules) were going to take it away from me. I needed it. In the end, I didn’t take it and understood why it was important not to, but I did lie and even schemed to keep some of it. Truth be told, I believe they lied to me about being able to have access to it when I needed it. If it was to be denied, then I would be denied.

I haven’t been forthcoming (I lied) about the severity of side effects to my oncologists. This isn’t that uncommon. If a drug is working, having the dose reduced or switching to something else isn’t an option that I feel I can risk. I’ve learned where the line is of tolerable pain and too much pain and try not to use language that indicates the latter. Now, this isn’t particularly helpful because side effects need to be documented so patients are believed when they report them.

I am trying to reform.

This next tidbit has been a secret only a few have known until now. There were restrictions where patients were allowed to be when I spent time in the hospital a few months ago. Cancer patients had to stay in the cancer area, which was made even smaller due to the wing where patients were most compromised due to transfusions. To get my 30 minutes of walking in per day involved a lot of repetitive back and forth that rather annoyed me and made me feel stupid. I (somewhat) jokingly texted with a friend that I was thinking of hopping on the elevator I located and giving myself a wider territory. A conversational orderly told me the elevators could take me anywhere in the hospital when I asked. I thanked him. Perhaps I’d even escape, yet this was the coldest weekend in Wisconsin all winter. I wouldn’t get far. I opted against it because it really wasn’t in my best interest to put myself in unsterile areas.

Technically, these elevators were just outside where I was allowed to be.

However, the B6 stairwell was well within the oncology section of the hospital. I had walked by it probably a hundred times when it occurred to me this would be a perfect place to walk. I probably wouldn’t see anyone. It wasn’t a main stairwell. I could climb stairs up and down without holding onto the rail. At this point, I had been unhooked from the IV machine for a couple of hours each day and I was free. I’d keep my mask on because I wasn’t throwing all caution to the wind. So, I walked along the hospital corridor like I was minding my own business. I checked ahead of me and behind to make sure there were no personnel or any patients around.

Into the stairwell I darted.

It was wonderful. Up and down I went to my heart’s content. When I felt satisfied that I had done some good repetitive climbing, I instinctively stood inside the stairwell listening for noises like footsteps or voices. My behavior alarmed me only slightly with the realization I had some makings of a criminal inside me.

I’d do it again.

In fact, I did the next day.

Was this lying or cheating? I would argue I stayed within my area. By entering into the stairwell that was in my area, I was merely extending my designated space.

I also have some makings of a lawyer. I’d credit my years as a teacher where many a student impressed me and taught me how to break rules later in life. It was pretty easy get confessions and disprove their stories. They always left clues. I’m careful I cover my tracks.

Yes, cancer has turned me into a liar. As I mentioned, I’ve done it for self-preservation. The lies are part of the invisible wall I sometimes need around me to keep myself emotionally safe. I also learned other things over time. I’ve discovered that no one really cares what I do. No one is watching that closely. I could get away with an awful lot if I had a devious nature.

The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me.

Ayn Rand

I operate from this quote often because I’m sick of things being ripped from me because of cancer. If I have a plan and can present myself well, permission is secondary. I can think of one example where I was told I couldn’t pursue a fundraiser I had planned. Not accepting this as the final answer, I tweaked the plan and reworded a few things so it could move forward.

Ayn Rand’s quote has given me courage to move like I know what I’m doing even when I don’t. (Living with cancer presents this opportunity often.) My college roommate came up for a visit a few years ago and we wanted to visit our former dorm. It was closed for summer and being used to host those staying for conferences. Why couldn’t we appear to be someone who belonged? We needed to walk in like we belonged there and knew where we were heading, while avoiding eye contact with anyone at the front desk. Doors and elevators were locked but we were able to talk our way in by pleading our case to an empathetic custodian.

And again, when it comes right down to it, no one cares what I do. I don’t draw attention. If I’m under the radar and get my way, I still get my way. If a lie has saved me from tears or a conversation I don’t want to have, so be it. To my credit, I haven’t told any huge whoppers.

I’m not under oath to tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

I’m not even on trial.

And that’s the truth.

So help me God.

More Vortex Lessons

The Airport Vortex is where the energy affected me the strongest on my recent trip to Sedona.

Everything started off as planned. I was thrilled that the hike sloped downward and the steps weren’t too difficult. I felt waves of gratitude that I wouldn’t have to climb up them. This was a loop route. Long, but a loop.

One of the rules established from day one of hiking was that breaks were good. We took breaks often to recover and press on. One of these breaks was at a spot overlooking Sedona and the rocks as far as the eye could see. I noticed it looked like people sat above us on a rock formation to our right. I wondered if that could be the vortex and strolled over to read some signage before the climb. I didn’t see anything about the vortex.

Whoosh!

I was hit by sudden dizziness. Out of the blue. It only lasted for a moment, yet it shook my confidence. Was this the energy effect again? Why did I seem to experience these unsettling feelings rather than the euphoric tingling and wellness others had described? Hmmph. Seemed typical for me. I sat down at the overlook and nonchalantly got out my Gatorade.

Karil was ready to move on. We’ve been friends since 4th grade. I was not quite recovered and had to tell her I felt momentarily dizzy. I wondered if it was energetic. We chatted a bit with other hikers and learned the summit to the vortex was where we thought it might be. I was sure I could make it.

Off we went.

It was a short, steep climb. Ropes were secured to the sides to define a safe route. They came in handy to hold as you climbed. The last twenty feet or so consisted of one of those one way fairly narrow ascents. I announced I was lying down when I got to the top.

And so I did.

There I stayed. Opening my heart to the energy. Recharging my soul.

I recited my affirmations and prayed. My heart rate lowered 25-30 points. It felt good. No big whoosh of energy. I felt perfectly healthy on the summit. Fully alive.

Alas, all good things must come to an end. We decided we were ready to head back to the car which meant we had to climb up those rock steps I earlier had been so erroneously grateful to not have to climb up. Two breaks were taken quickly. Because of me. On the second one, I desperately looked for someplace to sit. I felt nauseous. I was on the edge of spontaneously sobbing. Energy worked viciously through me. Out with the bad, in with the good.

Backtrack to earlier in the week. Karil had shared a decision she may make where she was worried how she might be affected by someone’s reaction.

Backtrack farther. My fitness coach has often asked me a simple question when things get too hard for me. She asks, “So what?” So what if I can’t run like I want? So what if I can’t lift as much as I have before? So what if I’m not exactly where I want to be? The question all comes down to the narrative I tell myself (I’ve failed. I’m not good enough. I’m a wimp.) versus what it really means (I’m dealing with effects from cancer treatments. It isn’t a defining event. I can do many other things.).

I gave Karil a “So what?” scenario for her situation earlier in the week. It stayed on her mind.

She chose this moment to throw the question back to me.

So what if I couldn’t make it back to the car?

I could go back down to the bottom of the trail where there were a couple of prized parking spots off the road. She’d finish the climb and pick me up on her way down the road.

Ugh. I wanted to make it up the trail. It’s what I planned to do. Goals are to be met. Nothing else is acceptable. I’m a wimp if I can’t do it. That’s the narrative that ran through my mind. What did it really mean? Nothing. Completing the path up was not mandatory. I had another choice.

I told her I would take her offer.

Down I went. In minutes I was sitting in the shade depleting all my fluids I brought with me. Hydrating was a major priority on this vacation. I couldn’t get enough to drink for the rest of the day.

Part of me still wanted to make it back to the car. As close to losing it as I was, I recognized this was a teaching opportunity where I could lead by example. The teacher in me continues to live. It was also an excellent opportunity for me to practice what I preach.

Obviously, I need to be more careful what I preach.

Some people apparently listen.

For about two hours after this, my left eye burned, and my left nostril couldn’t stop dripping. My left side just felt watery. I took two recovery naps that afternoon. And I kept hydrating. Then all was well again. It was a strange reaction that I can’t attribute to anything. Oddly, it was my right side that felt a pulling a few days earlier on the Boynton Canyon hike.

Lessons from the Airport Vortex affirmed the following:

  1. I’m not in as good as shape as I wanted, but I still showed up. I will always do my best to show up.
  2. Although I didn’t take a poll at the vortex, the chances are pretty darn good I was the only one climbing that day with active cancer. That isn’t a small feat. It takes determination, a strong stubborn disposition, and stupidity. Forget that last thing. I’m proud of what I accomplish.
  3. The narrative I tell myself and what is really true is a work in progress for me.
  4. Energy doesn’t have to be understood to have an effect.
  5. I am infinitesimally small compared to the vast grandeur around me, but I am connected to that grandeur. We all are.

Epic vacations don’t come along often. The location, the scenery, and the hiking made this vacation unlike any other I’ve taken. It may sound like it was a lot of physical exertion. I would call it an active vacation. Nature is where I feel happy. It was in the 90s most afternoons. We hiked early in the morning. It still got warm, but Arizona’s dry heat feels cooler than Wisconsin’s humidity. Experiencing all of this with metastatic breast cancer makes it all the more special for me. Life is good.

Messages From Dad

I miss both of my parents every day. My dad died 25 years ago; my mom has been gone 8 years. Twenty-five years is a long time. I was able to make 17 more years of memories with my mom. Memories with my dad haven’t faded so much as they are farther back. More effort is required to revisit them.

I have hit the age where more people in my age group have lost a parent. We share our hurt. I also know people who have both parents still living and they don’t see or talk to them very often. I don’t wish them ill will. I’m thrilled they are still alive. It’s wonderful these friends and acquaintances don’t know the searing pain of losing a parent. They don’t live with grief that runs deep and long. But still, I feel it’s unfair that I’ve lost both. My parents were older. They developed health problems. They died. We all know life isn’t fair.

A while back, I was wishing for something from my dad. My mom pops up often in dreams and waking memories. I don’t get a lot of that from my dad. Time passed factors into it. I put it out there that I wanted to hear from him. In dreams, or signs, or messages, or something. Anything. I miss him a great deal. I don’t think it’s said enough how much adults still need parental love.

One of my routines before crawling into bed is to read for a few minutes. I settled one night into an oak rocker in my bedroom that I picked up at an estate sale. It’s solidly made and has a simple patterned upholstered seat and back. Soft lighting provided by a Tiffany like lamp with shades of blues and greens lit the corner of my bedroom. I rocked gently and read.

At one point, I turned my head to the left toward the table where the lamp sat.

And there he was.

.

.

.

Not as a ghost, hallucination, or in any human form. I saw his handwriting poking out from a small stack of treasures that has sat there between five to ten years.

It had been there every night. His handwriting jumped out this night when I needed a sign.

It was a 3 x 5 notecard that had completely browned over time. My father served in WWII. This could have fit in his wallet but I’m not sure it did because it wasn’t bent. If not in his wallet, it was likely in a desk drawer or the top drawer in the chest where a lot of papers and some jewelry were kept. I’m not sure where I discovered it. I felt it was important and I took it. Clearly, I also forgot about it, but here it was to remind me when I needed it. It was one of those moments mixed with smiles and a slow but steady flow of tears. He had copied a quote from Winston Churchill about wartime living on the notecard.

I pulled the notecard out with my thumb and index finger like one would in a magic trick where you picked any card from cards splayed in front of you like a fan. I read it slowly as if it were a riddle, for that was what it felt to me. The word defiance hit me stronger than the others. I don’t want to dwell in the battle imagery that many who live with cancer use and just as many find cringeworthy. But hey, there it was staring at me in the face. These words were about war, not cancer. Exceptions must be made. If anyone has applied them to cancer, it’s me.

Allow me to say I don’t feel I am in defeat. I feel beat up. I feel constantly up against some stupid cancer or noncancer thing. I feel like I can’t get through to the very people working to keep me alive. I feel exhausted and that I never can catch a break. I feel defiant though and unwilling to give an inch more to cancer.

As far as the other words are concerned, I’m always searching for resolution. Mainly, I search at my oncology appointments through time with my oncologist and all the tests and treatments I do. But I look for answers in so many places. I read articles. I follow leads on the internet. I make note of studies others are in that may be of some benefit to me. There are group chats. I talk to and message friends. Virtual conferences are attended such as the SABCS (San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium) and LBBC (Living Beyond Breast Cancer). Occasionally, I’ll listen to a podcast. To be honest, it all overwhelms me. My days can’t be only about metastatic breast cancer.

Magnanimity and good will are always good guiding words. Generosity and compassion should never be overlooked. We need both in our world now more than ever.

I set the card back on the side table and shuffled through what else was in the small stack. There was a prayer book with a daily reflection I’d given my mom one year for her birthday. I found some of my dad’s business cards and his resumé. There is a grief journal I started after my mom died. The journal deserves a separate post of its own.

I also found the last birthday card I gave my dad along with more of those smiles and loving tears.

The middle section jumped out to me where it read he knew in his heart that I’d find a way. I realize I chose the card, but it was chosen based on who he was. I always knew my dad’s belief in me was present and constant whether whatever I did was big or small. I’m sure it’s why I chose this particular card. He knew I’d do well on tests. He thought it was great I played tennis. He supported all my band activities. He happily shuttled me back and forth from college to home on weekends. My dad knew I’d find a way. As evidenced on this card, even as a young adult the idea of finding a way was developing, perhaps just a seed of the oak tree pictured on the card. I would have to find my way a lot sooner without him.

A few weeks later he came to me again, this time in a dream. I was at my grandma’s farmhouse in the kitchen, milling around where the cookie jar was kept. Ah, that cookie jar. My grandma, mom, and dad were all in the dining room. Dad called for me to come into the living room. As I got closer to the adjoining doorway, everything went bright white and I couldn’t see. I knew my dad was going to hug me. I kept inching forward into the blinding light. Eventually, I shuffled into him and we hugged. I felt warm all over and felt a tight squeeze of his arms around me. I couldn’t see anything. Then I was jolted awake. I always wake up too soon. I am convinced it was a real hug from him. Make of that what you will.

I got my sign, my message, my something. I received several. Thanks, Dad.

You are there for me.

Always.

Hiking and Healing in Sedona

Sedona is a place of wonder and striking beauty. I took my first vacation in almost two years there at the beginning of summer. My intentions were to hike and experience the vortex healing that has made the area famous.

The Sedona vortexes are described as swirling centers of energy where the earth seems more alive with energy. Juniper trees grow with twisting trunks as a result of said energy. These vortexes are believed by many to support healing and cleanse negative energies from the body. People go there for mediation, self-reflection, and of course – healing.

Some just enjoy the hikes. There reportedly are around 135 different hikes one can take. I did four; two will be shared here.

Hike #1: Boynton Canyon

I walk and hike at home but found myself thinking my first “easy” Sedona hike as pretty darn hard. Most of it was manageable until the path began to climb upward toward the red rocks of Boynton Canyon. The step-ups were high, comparable to two or three steps on a staircase. The rocks themselves were uneven. My eyes were constantly scanning for an easier path. I used my hands on the rocks to help steady myself as I climbed. I sat on my butt a few times to boost myself up. My balance was alarming. I swayed when standing still. My knees were wobblier than a broken wheel on a bicycle. As I hiked, I oddly felt a strong pull to my right. A quick way down was to my right. Could this be the vortex? Elevation? Just poor balance on my part?

I called my hike done when I made my usual grunts of groans of exasperation. These are one of my signs that I need to stop doing what I’m doing. My friend finished climbing to where we decided we’d stop to meditate. I perched upon a giant rock and drank some water. I quickly switched to my Gatorade for something stronger. It usually perks me up and it did its job. After a brief rest, I too finished the climb.

I found another rock for a good rest. I looked out over the canyon and then to my right where the rocks tried to touch the sky. After a bit, I closed my eyes. Focused on my breath. Waited for something. Guidance. A sense of that universal energy. Nothing happened. I chose to focus on words that struck me as significant in that moment – balance and healing. Over and over, my mind slowly repeated these words. Something happened. My heart felt a slow warmth taking over inside. I felt a smile spread across my face and just basked in the feeling. Connection to something bigger than myself is an extraordinary feeling.

The return route was easier even though I still lowered myself down a few of those big steps on my butt.

Hike #2: Oak Creek

Oak Creek was the next day’s hike. It is mainly flat (yay) and shaded (double yay). The creek burbles along the base of Cathedral Rock. Cathedral rock has a portion that is described as a near vertical climb. We agreed we didn’t need this experience. The vortex was supposedly strongest at the end of the trail.

The sound of the creek refreshed me. Never would I have guessed Arizona could remind me of home. I felt like I was walking in parts of Pheasant Branch. The water was deeper here and flowed faster. After a good walk, we each settled into our own areas to meditate. It was deeply peaceful, but I didn’t experience any sense of a strong energy.

This trail required we retrace our steps to get back to our starting point. Halfway back, I began to experience a sharp pain on my right side where my liver is located. Hello cancer. Or hello energy? Somewhere I had read that you might feel discomfort of old injuries as healing worked. The pain vanished in a couple of minutes.

Then there was the snake. A beautiful nonvenomous snake stretched its full length (4 feet or so) as it crossed in front of us. If I see snakes back home in Pheasant Branch, they are small little things that you could easily step on before seeing them. Not this snake. I could have wrapped it around my waist and tied it like a belt. I was cautiously mesmerized by this friend. I learned snakes are symbols of transformation and healing. There’s a snake curled around a rod often seen in medical settings. It is associated with Asklepios, known as the ancient mythical god of medicine.

Was it a coincidence that I felt pain on this hike?

Was it a coincidence that shortly thereafter I saw a snake?

Was it healing?

I don’t believe in coincidences.

Time will tell. Time won’t tell if healing is attributed to the energy of the vortexes, my current cancer drug, or both.

Do I feel healed?

Yes. I felt GOOD in Sedona! Remarkably and unbelievably well. Many factors contribute to healing. I feel healed. And I’m going to hold tightly to that feeling.

Always.

To Be An Untamed Cheetah

Glennon Doyle thinks about life differently from the mainstream population. I think I understand one or two basic ideas about life. Then I read her book Untamed, and she turned them upside down. 

Recent books I’ve read have been a topic of posts lately. This book reminded me that being untamed, even a little untamed, is the way we are supposed to be all along. The chapters are often short segments of storytelling where she makes her point through metaphor. Her style speaks to me as I often use narrative and metaphors to craft my writing. She gently encourages and inspires as she writes, sharing her story and thoughts with readers. There is a lot that resonated with me in Untamed.

One of those ideas is how we become adults and take our chosen place in society. It’s a chosen place we’ve dreamed of, worked hard for, and understand what our role is to be. Glennon draws a parallel between this life and a cheetah at a zoo who has been trained and tamed to mimic a dog rather than act like the cheetah it is.

She defines being tamed as meaning you have made yourself fit. We have been conditioned by the people and life around us. We have learned how we are supposed to act and feel rather than be act like our cheetah selves.

I took my place as a teacher and understood that I was seen as a teacher outside of the classroom as well as in it. Not being wild and crazy, I fit the persona well. Nurturing, well-liked, respected, and all the other positive qualities you would want to assign to a teacher. Underneath all that, there was also an expectation that you would not openly challenge authority too much. It contradicted teaching children to question and think critically. I didn’t challenge anything too much until I was diagnosed with metastatic cancer. It became clearer over time that I didn’t need to (and couldn’t) make myself fit. I do believe age and growing older also causes changes in our confidence and how we see life. I was able to behave more like a cheetah.

Women behave more like cheetahs as we age. Society wants to call us cougars. That label portrays women only one way. No, not sorry – we’re cheetahs. Get out of the way.

Women especially have been tamed to fulfill certain norms that are outdated and antiquated. We take care of others first. We may not reach high enough. We accept put downs from one another. About a month ago I listened quietly as women commented on young women who would never marry or have children because of metastatic cancer. Well, I’m no spring chicken, but there I was with no hubby and no children. The comment wasn’t meant to be hurtful or even apply to me, but that tamed part of me silently took it in rather than roaring. I’m tamed.

She goes even farther with a personal story to emphasize how unhealthy it is deny yourself permission to live how you want. Glennon described the time when she had neurological Lyme disease and was sick for two years. She couldn’t function and spent the majority of those two years in bed or swallowing pills. She felt better when she visited a friend living in Florida and it was then she understood she needed to stay there. Not only did she need to stay there, she wanted to stay there because she always had loved the beach.

We shouldn’t need a brush with death to learn how to live.

We always should honor our true selves.

In many ways, living with metastatic breast cancer has given me that permission to live more truthfully. I won’t say it’s allowed me to live as I want because I don’t want to live with all the suffering and uncertainty that accompanies cancer. I wake when I’m rested most mornings rather than rolling out in the dark to an alarm that sounds way too early. I don’t put in extra hours at a job I love just to feel like I’m barely keeping up. I don’t put myself last. Instead, I have time for me. I can take chances to do things that before cancer I would never have dared. When it comes down to it – no one cares and no one stops me.

We all need to live how we want.

Glennon Doyle wants us to shake things up a bit. Maybe a lot. She writes a lot about learning to be brave and become true to yourself. Our purpose is to live authentically and fully.

Here are a few ways I’ve seen myself becoming untamed:

• I’m an active and vocal participant in my medical care.

• I say NO more often.

• I have control over my own show and I like it. I can get a lot done when I can envision a goal and fully pursue it.

• I ask a lot more questions.

• I express my opinions more often.

I haven’t been to a zoo in a few years. The closest zoo to me doesn’t have a cheetah exhibit. Of course, all the animals are confined. They are there so humans can see wild animals. None of them behave as they should. They are tamed in the Glennon Doyle sense of the word.

Cheetahs are symbols of patience and intensity. As a spirit animal, they remind us to prioritize and set goals. I want to let my inner cheetah run wild. I want to move stealthily and quietly to get what I want.

Ah, to be a cheetah is to live more untamed. I will be more unleashed, uncaged, and even more wonderful than I already am.