Off Roading

When I went off roading in Sedona, I went for a rugged adventure. I wanted to experience something new I hadn’t done before. It was an opportunity to see things that I would be unable to see on my own. I had no idea that there would be a cancer connection.

Off roading and cancer were two things that were simply too far apart to be connected.

I didn’t think about cancer at all on my Pink Jeep Tour. Bouncing around as the jeep hit every bump and rock possible while taking in all the scenery was all I could manage. Distractions from metastatic breast cancer are rare for me. The connections between the two hit me after I returned home.

Off roading is quite a metaphor for cancer.

Both take you off the main road you found yourself on that was a smooth and comfortable ride.  Suddenly, the smooth paved road has disappeared. The navigation system doesn’t work. No signs mark the way to tell you where you are. It is unknown territory. To maneuver on this terrain takes skill. The big difference is off roading is fun and cancer is not.

Some refer to cancer as a bump in the road. This may be a fitting description for early stage cancer where treatment is successful and cancer doesn’t return. Metastatic cancer is an unpaved road made of mainly rocks that cause THOUSANDS of bumps. They appear as soon as the road changes from asphalt to dirt and rocks. One jolt is met with another, and then another, followed by countless more. They come rapidly like bullets out of a gun.

There was even a highlight of the tour that was called the staircase of no return where the jeep lurched and jerked down a slope made of rocks that resembled a staircase. Those of us with metastatic disease travel these bumps. We passed the point of no return when we were diagnosed.

The guide described the tour being like a roller coaster. A roller coaster fits my life, too. Up, down, upside down, lightning speed, and filled with twists and turns. Metastatic cancer is like a runaway rollercoaster in the mountains filled with precarious dangers like cliffs, avalanches, and a vicious wild animal or two. You can’t get off it. The topsy-turvy ride is over if you do.

He went on to share with the group how he was trained. It appeared like he was driving with no plan over the course of our 3-hour tour. However, part of his training was to make sure the tires hit exact markers to keep everyone safe. I’ve connected this to precision medicine and targeted treatments. His comments have also made me think about how my decisions matter. Like those tire tracks, I have to make sure I hit things at exactly the right angles at the right moment. And I have no control. I can’t control what my oncologist will say, or test results, or research. I’m trying to drive my own off-road vehicle without training. I’m self-taught and feel I have a certain level of expertise, but man, I wish I knew how to be a better driver on this bumpy road.

The tour was remarkable in the unparalleled beauty it revealed and what it taught me about life that has nothing to do with cancer. Maybe it does.

I was reminded what it felt like to feel free.

To celebrate life.

To continue to find meaning.

I rediscovered how important it is to know my worth. I am worth a lot. Confidence was gained every day I hiked. I began my vacation being unsure about my steps and gradually I found myself more decisive on where I placed my foot. I made very tiny leaps from one rock to another. Reminders to live in the moment and live fully are welcome.

I want to share one final thought on the agave plant. It has nothing to do with tequila. The agave has a life span of 20-25 years and it blooms only once in its life. It sprouts a tall stalk over 6 feet that resembles an asparagus stalk when it is near the end of its life. This can grow 3 to 8 inches a day when it gets ready to bloom. The blossoms are yellow and then they turn red. They bloom and the plant is said to be most beautiful at the end of its life. I find that deeply sad. The rest of our group seemed to find it oddly beautiful. I refuse to draw parallels to human life, to my life. It doesn’t make sense to me that something that has taken so long to shine only lasts a few days.

And yet I can’t help it. Since I look for meaning in things, I wonder what I am meant to know from the agave. A lot of goodness, joy, and success has come my way over the past couple of years. I’ve always been a late bloomer. Is this it?

No, I am not an agave plant. I’ve bloomed more than once.

Beauty blooms and thrives in inhospitable conditions. It can sprout up from cracks in rocks, tolerate insufferable heat, and grow without rain. I can relate. I stay alive even with cancer. I shall continue to bloom like a rare rose, a wildflower, or even a desert cactus.

The off roading adventure was beyond bumpy. It was also healing. I saw scenery I would have no other way of seeing. I discovered an uncrowded spot to watch the sunset that was easily accessible. It was healing by going and getting away from my life here. Sadly, the vortexes did not have the healing power I hoped. Maybe I’m a fool for hoping they would. Stranger things have happened. Inexplicable natural phenomenon rests solidly in that category. So many cancer things don’t make sense to me anyway.

I’ll take every bit of hope I can get on this bumpy road.

Author: Kristie Konsoer

I've been living well with metastatic breast cancer since 2012. This blog is a place where I can share thoughts and ideas on cancer, how I feel perceptions of cancer must change, and how I am finding a way to live with strength, hope, meaning, resiliency, humor, and hopefully a little wisdom.

5 thoughts on “Off Roading”

  1. What an amazing experience! The applications to MBC are endless and so very applicable. And I agree, you’ve bloomed more than once and have mode blooms ahead of you, despite the lack of control we have in this experience. And you’ve many cheerleaders and co-pilots along the way. 😉❤️

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s