Holly Hobby and Tennis Balls

‘Tis the season for gift giving.

I grew up in a family that was a bit over the top with the number of presents that my parents gave to their children. Discovering the floor covered with gifts under the tree on Christmas morning was such joy. There were toys as a child, then lots of clothes as a teen, and then more grownup gifts in adulthood.

My Holly Hobby doll was a favorite Christmas present. Santa brought her all the way from the North Pole one year. She played outside with me and still has a smudge on her right hand from some adventure. She even came on a couple of family vacations. We survived traveling cross country together long before the days of seat belt legislation. I remember riding in the front seat sitting on my mom’s lap while holding Holly Hobby on mine. That car had no central air conditioning. Sometimes my mom held both her daughters and our dolls at the same time despite a perfectly good back seat. Holly Hobby is still with me and lives on one of the beds in a guest room with the Bucky Badger I got another year from Santa. I know it would be nice if someone played with them again, but I decided long ago they both were staying with me. I’ve always been too sentimental.

Jewelry made excellent gifts as I grew older. Pearls and gemstones are treasured gifts that are more meaningful to me today than when I got them. I think I need to wear these more often to dress up my yoga pants and more relaxed attire.

Gifts of lesser monetary value carry meaning, too. My dad was especially vocal about how he liked tennis balls that I received one year as one of my birthday gifts. It has become a running joke with a friend of mine years later. I liked the tennis balls, too.

Christmas will be different this year because of the pandemic. Gifts will likely be exchanged and opened by myself at home with some type of video connection. A cold garage idea was floated but I am not excited about that option. Home by the hearth works for me.

Holidays can be hard.

It was simpler when Holly Hobby or tennis balls was all it took to make me smile. I could give my dad an Old Spice soap on a rope and my mom a knick-knack decoration and all was well in our worlds.

There truly is very little I need in terms of material goods. I am fortunate to be able to buy what I need. It ensures I get what I want without waiting. Amazon Prime hasn’t helped. Giving myself gifts and treats are an important part of my self-care. Can I share a secret? Having just shared I don’t feel I’m too materialistic, I’m going to wrap my gifts to myself this year and put them under my tree.

To me, from me.

An unprecedented year calls for some new moves of my own.

Experiences and time together are more valuable gifts to me. I still want to get to Sedona. I’d like to eat inside restaurants. I would love to have friends gather in my home. I would just like to see friends in person. Anywhere. The biggest factor is what my life looks like after there’s a vaccine for COVID-19. I’d rather hang out with my friends than have some big extravaganza event that is stressful. Some may enjoy extravaganzas. Not my cup of tea. I’d enjoy that cup of tea in a relaxed setting much more.

I have the gifts of family, friends, and a beautiful home where I feel safe. I receive top notch health care. I am kind and have a good sense of humor. These are all priceless gifts. Call it the holiday spirit, but my life is good. Cancer is not good, but my life is good.

What makes good gifts for someone with cancer?

A permanent cancer zapper would be perfect.

Good gifts should match a person’s interests. It doesn’t hurt to ask if something is needed or what might be appreciated. Please skip the pink crap, cancer ornaments, or things that take up a lot of space. Food may be welcome, but some of us have dietary restrictions we are trying to follow or may not tolerate spicy foods. I remember a couple home cooked meals I received as part of meal trains when going through initial chemo in 2012 that were exactly what I needed. Gift cards for takeout or delivery are thoughtful. Books are great if you know what kind of writing or favorite authors someone likes to read.

Experiences are the type of gifts that mean a lot to me. Tickets to a show. Listening to a concert. An afternoon history lecture. A gift certificate for a massage. Hiking someplace I’ve never been. All of these aren’t possible during a pandemic. Hiking is possible but I am hesitant to venture somewhere less traveled on my own where I could get lost. I’ve gotten lost twice before on hikes. I’m not looking for a stressful adventure. Some familiarity is welcome during crazy times.

One former colleague I have known for years does something incredible for gifts. She and the adults in her family don’t exchange presents but pitch in together and make a substantial donation to a charity they agree upon. Last year it was my fundraiser for metastatic breast cancer research. It blew me away but is a gift idea that has stuck with me.

If this idea appeals to you, here are a few possibilities that do research or support cancer research:

More For Stage IV

One Woman Many Lakes

Mary Gooze is a friend of mine. She is the one amazing woman behind One Woman Many Lakes and creator of the More For Stage IV Fund. Both links above will lead you to the same site to donate. Incidentally, Mary is planning to raise $70,000 for the Stage IV fund for her 70th birthday in June of 2021. She has a separate fundraising page set up to track those donations you can find here.

As always, thoroughly research how money you donate is used and how much is allocated for research. For full disclosure, I am partial to research happening at Carbone Cancer Center if you couldn’t tell from the multiple times I’ve shared their link.  I know there are many reputable research facilities making worthy strides in research. Here are a few others that I have heard good things about outside of Wisconsin. I always look for pull down tabs for metastatic breast cancer research or a way to direct a donation for research to a specific cancer type such as childhood, lung, colon, prostate, etc.

Metavivor

Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Mayo Clinic

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

A donation to research is a great gift any time of year.

Holly Hobby, tennis balls, and even jewelry aren’t bad either.

Happy gift giving to you as you go about making the world a bit brighter this season.

Author: Kristie Konsoer

I've been living well with metastatic breast cancer since 2012. This blog is a place where I can share thoughts and ideas on cancer, how I feel perceptions of cancer must change, and how I am finding a way to live with strength, hope, meaning, resiliency, humor, and hopefully a little wisdom.

5 thoughts on “Holly Hobby and Tennis Balls”

  1. When I read “soap on a rope” my eyes felt a little memory form in them as we used to give our Dad soaps that our Mom would buy for us from an Avon catalog back in the 70s. Thank you as always for sharing your story with us all as it is a real gift.

    Like

    1. Good memories for sure. Soaps on a rope were stored far down in my memories until they popped up here. I did a quick search after reading your comment and they are still made if you need to add more sensory to those memories. 💕

      Liked by 1 person

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