The “I” in Patient

We all know there is no I in TEAM.

But there is an I in PATIENT.

I am an integral part of my care team.

I am the reason for my team.

I am the team member who is affected by decisions.

I care the most about those decisions.

I understand my health well.

I know how I feel.

I track my side effects.

I notice minute changes in my body and how I feel.

I take charge of my health.

I don’t accept no easily.

I believe in science and in myself.

I should not be discounted.

I won’t stay in my lane.

I participate in my care (which is my lane by the way).

I advocate for my needs.

I ask questions.

I don’t just have cancer.

I have feelings.

I use my voice.

I get tired from having to push so darn hard to be seen and heard. My biggest annoyance lately has been feeling like my voice doesn’t matter because I am the patient. There have been a couple of recent instances where I’ve literally had to say something along the lines that I could be consulted and believed. I had helpful and needed information. It’s hard for me not to let anger filter through some responses. Information I bring to a conversation isn’t validated until it can be cross-checked with my oncologist or my record. Some information isn’t entirely correct in my record. It needed to be written a certain way as it was the lesser of two evils. I understand facts are not up to interpretation, but not all of them are black and white. Facts have circumstances. Specifically, facts can change in terms of what I was given in initial scans versus what I need currently.

It took me about 5 phone calls over 3 days to get my last set of scans scheduled. I’ll try to be concise. I had heard nothing after a week. I found that unacceptable and began going through the proper channels so I could get them on the calendar. A recent conference call with a scheduIer in imaging and scheduler from my oncologist’s office upset me. I began to lose it after about twenty minutes of the run around and some misinformation in the initial orders (a case of botched facts). I’ve paraphrased two especially bothersome exchanges.

Imaging Scheduler: It says here you need a premed.

Me: No, I usually don’t take anything.

Imaging Scheduler: If the oncologist believes you need medication for the scan, they will order it.

Me: I don’t need anything because I don’t get the additional contrast dye. You might want to ask me as I’m the patient being kicked around. I know what I need. I won’t consent to take something that I don’t need.

The conversation kept deteriorating. I was close to tears and knew I was getting stuck with the short end of the stick. We all knew I needed accommodations and yet I felt I was being blamed because slots were full. I had been trying for days to make progress with getting these tests scheduled.

Oncology Scheduler: We can proceed with your next treatment only if you can get your scans before your oncology and treatment visit. Otherwise your treatment will need to be pushed to the next week.

Me: Well, that’s a real shitty deal for me, pardon my language. My treatment is a pretty big deal. I need it on time. I’m being treated like I’m not even human. Now, I can come in on two separate days so I can fit these requirements because several people have dropped the ball in getting the scans to happen.

My frustrations were understood.

Right.

We scheduled scans at inconvenient times on two separate days because I had little choice and needed to set definite dates and times. I would do what I had to do. Always do. Always will. The imaging scheduler was going to keep working and see if she could get them on the same date. I wasn’t going to hold my breath. I would place a call to the patient relations department and let them know that known scans needed to be scheduled as soon as possible after an oncology visit so the patient isn’t left burdened for no valid reason. They could do better. I also wanted to suggest beginning the scheduling process sooner for myself if I needed accommodations. You can bet I’ll be bringing this up sooner than is needed so the process is easier for me next time.

My phone rang the next morning. It was the imaging scheduler who had found a way to get my appointments to work with the accommodations I needed, at my preferred location, and on a date that didn’t interfere with my treatment. I scarcely believed it! I felt much better about the fit I pitched a day earlier. I thanked her repeatedly and let her know how much it meant to me to have her work so diligently on my behalf. She made my day and I told her I hoped she would treat herself to something enjoyable, whatever that might be.

Sometimes I feel very Jekyll and Hyde. I am really quite delightful when my buttons aren’t being pushed. I would rather work toward solutions amenably. Life is smoother for everyone that way. However, I can unleash my fury quickly when I’ve had enough. I had had enough. I feel like I’m like my own attack dog when this happens. I am all I have.

Then there are the times I feel like I’m not an agreeable patient. I wouldn’t describe myself as noncompliant, maybe some medical professionals would. Too bad. I ask questions and advocate for what I need. Cancer has taught me a lot.

I am a patient.

Listen to me.

Include me.

Value me.

Author: Kristie Konsoer

I am a breast cancer survivor, living well with metastatic breast cancer since 2012. This blog is a place where I can share thoughts and ideas on how I feel perceptions of cancer must change, and how I am finding a way to live with strength, hope, meaning, resiliency, humor, and hopefully a little wisdom.

6 thoughts on “The “I” in Patient”

  1. Dang, Kristie ! You and Elaine (from Seinfeld episode) are ‘difficult’ patients! What do you mean asking for more cooperation?!? Let’s get into your medical file and cut any Elaine comments out! Ask for what you need! Ask loudly if they don’t hear! Ask again! Advocacy is tiring but you persisted! Dang, again!

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    1. Thank you, Linda. The others involved were there to help. It gets complicated from time to time when all of the boxes that need to be checked to follow policy and protect me actually wind up being incredibly unhelpful.

      Like

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