Trust Suckers and Trust Blowers

A person can be either a Trust Sucker or a Trust Blower.

A Trust Sucker functions exactly how you would expect. Trust is sucked right out of you over time. Maybe it’s through belittling, embarrassment, manipulation, non-shared values as to what is public vs. private information, or repeated poor judgment. It feels like air is being pumped out of your lungs and you are left gasping for breath. The sucker sucks because of what he or she needs, not because of what you are doing or not doing. My theory is trust suckers feel very alone and are unhappy with the success, independence, closeness, or whatever it is that someone else has that they do not.

Trust Blowers are the polar opposites of the suckers. Just as you feel emotionally spent after being with a sucker but may not realize exactly why, you feel differently after being in the company of a blower. Blowers send supportive, positive, and uplifting energy your way. Inhaling is easy. They truly want what is best for you. There is an overwhelming feeling of safety with blowers. They are easy to trust because you know a confidence will stay confidential.

I need to dwell with the blowers as someone living with metastatic breast cancer. It’s about not spending essential energy on people or situations that don’t serve my best health. It’s about taking care of myself and not trying to fix someone else. It’s about feeling loved and trusting myself. I don’t have the energy to waste on someone I can’t trust.

I am extremely cautious about whom I trust in my personal life. As I age, I’ve gotten better at reading people and being able to discern whether to trust a person or not. In general, I use the following as guidelines to help make decisions:

  1. Does the person share private information about others when it isn’t their place to share? Someone who talks a lot about others is likely blabbing about me.
  2. Does the person remember what I’ve shared or take an interest in my life? Or are this person’s actions usually self-serving? Why does it matter? Self-serving people will not care when they break a trust because they lack compassion and empathy. They will not think they did anything wrong and that you are the one making too big of deal of things.
  3. Is the person a giver or a taker? Givers have others’ interests at heart. Takers take and move on to the next opportunity.

Cancer has messed with my ability to trust. Before I was diagnosed, I trusted I would remain healthy and be able to work until a normal retirement age. I trusted annual mammograms and results from ultrasounds. When I went on leave, I trusted that the long-term disability company that my school district contracted with was looking out for my best interest. I now feel the goal of this company was to get me on social security disability income so they wouldn’t have to pay as much. I’ve trusted scan results and later received information that contradicted those facts. Facts aren’t up to interpretation.

There are days where I don’t even trust myself.

I’ve struggled trusting medical information. Sometimes I want to scream at the medical world just as I often did with education. There have been times where I’ve felt like a problem or a difficult patient, rather than a fellow human being. I only have minimum access to information posted regarding test results and I feel like information is being hidden from me when I ask for more. It’s my body and I have right to know. I didn’t lie in a scanner for two hours because it was fun. I do better with more information but it is a balance as too much overwhelms me. Then there have been times where I have felt I was not liked. It’s hard to entrust your care to someone when you feel that someone doesn’t care.

One recent instant surrounds a recent cancer medication I took. I had been told it was important to take it consistently in the morning at around the same time for best results. This is true for most medication. However, this apparently didn’t hold true on treatment days because it was more important to make sure labs were all good. It would be okay to take said drug in the afternoon on those days. I had to keep a patient diary to provide data for a study I was involved with on when I took it, what dose, and its side effects. I took the diary seriously. Months later I was told that no one cared when I took the med by the nurse who collected the data. Even while I stared at this person in disbelief, I told myself I would take it in the mornings even on treatment days if no one cared.

I cared.

I still have diaries that haven’t been collected because I am not on that drug any longer and I no longer have contact with this nurse. How important could this data be? What was entered in its place? Was anything entered? I also still have a one to two month supply of this drug that I was supposed to return when I moved off the study. I haven’t been asked to do so since this nurse hasn’t come knocking for it.

Guess who doesn’t care now?

I’m not going out of my way to return any of it. Chalk it up to medical protocols and schedules in the life of COVID. There are more important things our health professionals need to deal with other than my patient diary and unused pills. Yet, I can’t help but question developments in my patient experience when scenarios like this unfold over time. Details deemed important one day were discarded the next. The inconsistency still surprises me.

Trust matters in a patient doctor relationship. I try hard to trust my oncologist, other doctors, and nurses. I do most of the time. I am not the same patient I was at the start of my metastatic cancer diagnosis. I will speak up. I will ask questions. I will disagree. I will persist and ask again if a question goes unanswered. This may not be a matter of distrust as much as needing information so I understand.

I am part of the team.

I expect to walk together.

I won’t follow blindly.

Trust is built over time and is a strong foundation for solid relationships. I will always look for the blowers rather than the suckers in my life whether it’s personally or medically. Whenever there is uncertainty, and there is plenty of uncertainty, I want people I trust with me so we can walk together.

Author: Kristie Konsoer

I am a breast cancer survivor, living well with metastatic breast cancer since 2012. This blog is a place where I can share thoughts and ideas on how I feel perceptions of cancer must change, and how I am finding a way to live with strength, hope, meaning, resiliency, humor, and hopefully a little wisdom.

5 thoughts on “Trust Suckers and Trust Blowers”

  1. Yes yes yes! Such a great post and so very very very true. I also don’t feel like I’m treated like a person in the healthcare system. I’m also a person who is conscientious about instructions and am flabbergasted when it’s not meaningful to my team. I also protest loudly and frequently about the lack of info. It’s exhausting and it unduly burdens us, the people who need the treatment. Thank you for this post!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. There will always be suckers and blowers. Perhaps we need to know them both so we can appreciate their distinctions and our responses to them?
    When I was going through radiation treatment, I wondered why when I had successive treatments scheduled they could tack on a treatment at the end of my cycle in order to be closed on Labor Day? I was perplexed. They could cancel but I couldn’t. The double standard exists.
    Surround yourself with blowers and stay the course of self discovery and self advocacy. You already do so well. May Spirit continue to blow its gentle wisdom over you to nourish you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are fewer suckers in my life these days. I do surround myself with as many blowers as possible. Love how Spirit gently blows. Felt the soothing breeze in the arboretum this morning.

      Like

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