Face Fear

What I’ve learned about fear over and over again is that the anxious anticipation of something is always worse than the event itself. There have been conversations I have dreaded and events I was sure would result in my getting the short end of the stick. The events happened and life went on.

One of these events was returning to chemotherapy back in the summer of 2016. I wanted to avoid this option like I want to avoid a bad cold, negative people, and raw seafood. It was my second experience with chemo – an unwanted sequel to that of years earlier. Eribulin was the name of the chemotherapy drug to be used. It is a cell cycle specific drug that attacks something called the microtube structures within cells. These microtube structures help a cell divide and reproduce. Stopping the microtube structures from functioning results in cell death. Goodbye cancer cells. Normal cells grow back.

I was terrified of effects like I had had when I had chemo back in 2012. I threw up so much after the first infusion back then that I needed to go to the hospital for fluids. I contracted fungal pneumonia and the shingles a couple of months later that landed me in the hospital. I gained a lot of weight due to steroids to battle nausea. I was lethargic and my mind was in a fog for months after the treatments ended. I knew what going through chemo was like and it was something I really didn’t want to repeat.

But it was my best option.

The day came to receive the first dose of eribulin on July 26, 2016. No throwing up, no nausea, no lethargy, no weight gain. I lost my hair again and was without it for over three years because of this drug and the drugs that followed. That reality and my feelings associated with it were difficult to navigate again. Otherwise, I felt unbelievably good. I had energy and could focus on activities that I enjoyed.

The weirdest thing happened once I faced my fears of having chemotherapy again and started treatment. Without the fear, profound moments of immense peace, joy, and intention took hold of me. The depression I had struggled with lifted when I went off the oral chemo pills I had been taking. I wasn’t teaching at his point in time, but I didn’t feel depressed. In fact, eribulin was a new lease on life. Every day off work was a day closer to coming back. I didn’t realize at the time it was the end of my career. My feet didn’t hurt with every step. I could walk again. I could hike.

Fear is almost always worse than the event itself. The fear I held about doing more traditional treatment again was worse than the reality. The eribulin wasn’t difficult to receive or tolerate. It was pushed through a syringe over two to five minutes. I didn’t feel a debilitating loss of energy and almost no nausea. For the first couple of months, I found I actually had lots of energy and felt wonderfully healthy (aside from needing chemotherapy in the first place). Low white blood counts were an issue, but that was a common problem encountered with many cancer treatments.

There are new fears. It’s a repetitive cycle every time I start a new treatment. What side effects will I experience? Will this treatment work? Lots of “what ifs.”

I have a lot of fears of treatments not working.

Fears of not having options.

Fears of my team not caring enough.

Fears of getting worse and losing my independence.

Fears of lots of things that make me cry and those thoughts make me feel unsafe and very alone.

And then there are the fears that my lovely hairstyle will always look like I’ve electrocuted myself. It has calmed somewhat over time. That one makes me smile and brings me back to where things are okay. My curls remind me I have no control and the straight and narrow never was my path. I’m unruly like the clouds in the sky. My hair feels comforting.

I face fear every day as someone living with metastatic breast cancer. The fear of having MBC has become so commonplace that I know it’s there, but I try not to think about it and I give it the least amount of space possible if I have to think about it at all. I face it down and get on with my day. I face fear like I face the mirror in the morning. Some days it takes more work.

Every so often I sit with it. We talk. Mostly I feel. Then I’m done. Until it resurfaces.

Fear has been on my mind more than usual lately. There are more unknowns. My biggest fears revolve around cruel consequences if my treatment is affected because of COVID-19. These unknowns could severely impact my other unknowns. I’ve hunkered down as much as I can and it still might not be enough. I began this post writing that the anticipation of an event is worse than the event itself. This virus may be the one scenario where that isn’t true. I don’t know. It will continue to play out over time where one domino affects another, even if the dominoes at first seem unrelated. Facing fear does not mean to act willfully stupid. It doesn’t mean you roll the dice and take your chances. Facing fear means being informed and having a plan. Right now that plan involves choosing the most protective option in all my decisions. I will continue to face the fear in my life by making smart, well thought out decisions. I will be grateful in my belief I am staying safe. I must believe hope is more pwerful than fear. And it is.

Author: Kristie Konsoer

I am a breast cancer survivor, living well with metastatic breast cancer since 2012. This blog is a place where I can share thoughts and ideas on how I feel perceptions of cancer must change, and how I am finding a way to live with strength, hope, meaning, resiliency, humor, and hopefully a little wisdom.

2 thoughts on “Face Fear”

  1. Fear and hope will take up residence in our lives with and without our permission or our own awareness sometimes.
    You have managed so much, dear Kristie.
    I rely on St. Teresa of Avila who wrote in the 1500s, as a woman religious, and mystic:

    Let nothing disturb you,
    Let nothing frighten you,
    All things are passing,
    God, alone suffices.

    This mantra joined me when I faced surgery, treatments, and even on my solo trip to Ukraine. I’ve used it as Simply as a rhythmic mantra, every time I need it. It works.

    Like

    1. You taught me this prayer long ago. I’ve used it many times and still do. Like you said, it has a rhythmic cadence, its words are comforting, and it works. I hope others read it and use it as they need it.

      Like

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